All 2005 Accords Pull to Right

According to the Honda salesman during and after a test drive of an Accord LX because Accords are front wheel drive they all pull slightly yo the right. Seems a ilttle strange. Has anyone incurred the same line or
problem?
-LMA
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He was probably referring to torque steer, which can be noticeable on starting up fast from a stop sometimes, but shouldn't be an ongoing situation. On a 4 cyl with an automatic you shouldn't be able to notice it.
On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 23:54:26 GMT, "Lawrence Adler"

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Burnt@ut wrote:

torque steer depends on relative wind-up, which is usually a function of driveshaft length. the 05 accord's have driveshafts /very/ close in length, so any torque steer will be minimal. automatic or not is irrelevant - it's the amount of torque transmitted, hence its name. and no, this dealer was blowing smoke. the vehicle should track straight. it was probably damaged on a test drive or in shipping.

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Lawrence Adler wrote:

BS. My '03 tracks straight and it is the same design.
John
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Lawrence Adler wrote:

for proof.
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2005 CRVs have a very well-known pull to the right problem. Just google "crv pull right" and you'll see. I'm not aware that the problem affects the Accords. Also, when at a car lot, I would never believe a word that comes out of a car salesman's mouth.

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M.Paul wrote:

It could also be that the car simply needs a wheel alignment. It's not unusual for a new car to need one upon arriving at the dealer.
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My '05 LX is fine. Don't buy from this salesman/dealer. If this particular Accord is doing this, you could also try another Accord or try a different dealer. Drive on a FLAT stretch of road.
-Dave
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I Dont know what year Accord you test drove, but my 93 accor pulls a little to the right sometimes, and when i accellerate hard in a right turn it pulls also... I think my problem is somewhat of an alignment problem but it is caused by being frontwheel drive, a rearwheel drive car that is off alignment just a little wont pull to the side like a fwd car will, the the salesman was not exactly lying to you, he just wasn't telling you the whole truth :)
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I know you drove a 2005 accord, but my 93 accord pulls a little to the right sometimes, and when i accellerate hard in a right turn it pulls also... I think my problem is somewhat of an alignment problem but it is caused by being frontwheel drive, a rearwheel drive car that is off alignment just a little wont pull to the side like a fwd car will, the the salesman was not exactly lying to you, he just wasn't telling you the whole truth :) Either way, a car shouldnt do what you are describing... there is a problem with that specific car, not the series
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Lawrence Adler wrote:

Give this guy the hook.
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Typically Honda defines a "pull" as a full lane change in less than 6 seconds at 60 mph on a flat road. A drift would be a full lane change, same conditions, in 6 seconds or longer. A car that "drifts" one full lane at 60 mph in 6 seconds or longer is within accepted industry standards, thus is normal.
Here is the procedure your Honda dealer might use to verify your complaint:
1. Check if your customer has original equipment wheels and tires and that the ride height hasnt been modified. If the wheels, tires, and ride height are OK, go to step 2. If the wheels or tires arent original equipment or the ride height was modified, stop here. Aftermarket wheels or tires or a ride height thats been modified pose challenges that this article doesnt cover. Resolve these issues with your customer before going further. 2. Set the tire pressures to the recommended cold inflation values listed on the doorjamb sticker. 3. Find a straight stretch of 4-lane road where you can safely (and legally) go 60 mph for several minutes. Ideally, you want a road thats perfectly flat, but most roads have a crown thats anywhere from 1.5 to 1.75 so they can drain. Flat Road - While driving at 60 mph, use a stopwatch to time how long it takes to drift one full lane from center to center. Record the time. Repeat this, driving in the opposite direction to cancel the effects of wind, then average the two times you recorded. Crowned Road - While driving at 60 mph, check if the vehicle climbs the crown. Do this for both a left- and right-crowned road. A drift to the right on a right-crowned road and a drift to the left on a left-crowned road are considered normal.
Lawrence Adler wrote:

-- Tp,
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No Lawsuit Ever Fixed A Moron...
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