sheared screw

While tightening (gently) the third screw on a new distributor cap, the screw (brand new and obviously defective) sheared and broke off at the surface of the hole on the body mount. For the moment the car operates with
two screws holding the distrib but I know this can't be good.
Anyone with a similar experience find a successful way to remove the butt of the screw threads from this fairly confined space? I appreciate your ideas.
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One may remove the whole distributor housing fairly easily so as to be able to remove the old, broken screw. On older Hondas, it's typically just three large bolts that hold the housing on. The whole housing rotates to set the timing, so remember to mark the housing beforehand. That's a bit tricky the first time, but once you free the housing, it will be obvious.

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Remove distributor to expose the broken bolt.
With a sharp punch or (small sharp chisel) and a hammer, gently drive the remnant counterclockwise. It should come out easily. The punch should be placed as close as possible to the edge of the remains of the bolt.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
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John Smith wrote:

Does any length of the bolt stick out from the back side of the hole? If so, then you might be able to turn it with some needle nose vise grips. Another option would to remove the distributor and drill it out with a left handed drill bit. Be sure to use a small punch to make a center mark on the remains of the bolt so that your drill bit will be centered. Using a left handed drill bit will loosen, if not completely remove, the broken off screw. However, a regular right handed drill bit will simply tighten the screw and make it more difficult to remove. If you decide to drill it out, then you should protect the rest of the distributor with a rag or by some other means to prevent metal flakes from interfering with the magnetic pick-ups in the distributor. If there's enough screw for a small punch to grab as Tegger suggested, then that might be the best way since it will reduce the possibilities of metal flakes getting lost inside the distributor. Note, that it would probably be best to use a timing light to reset the timing after after you put the distributor back.
Eric
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