why do mercedes diesel last forever?

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I was doing 105 mph KH

32mpg!!!
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OK, then you got GREAT mileage :-).
Rose
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LOL

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because they really do?!?
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I have an '84 300D TD that I bought at an auction with a bad transmission (couldn't test drive it!) w/190,000 miles. So I put a tranny in it and it lasted to 260,000 miles before it lost compression and got hard to start in cold weather. I pulled the engine and did a basic ring and valve job and fixed all the minor problems I could find. Now it starts up instantly, run good with lots of power, and quit smoking-- either at start up or with heavy accelleration. I'm glad I went to all the trouble to fix the car instead of buying another one with new problems, and my wife is very pleased-- she likes the car and feels safe in it when she uses it to commute to work.
--Geoff CA
Say not the Struggle nought Availeth wrote:

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dies gedichtet:

First of all: People like to repeat what they have heard elsewhere.
Indeed the 240D engine ist very sturdy. OTOH it delivers only 30 HP per litre, this is half the output which you can get from a modern diesel engine and only a third from what you usually get from a high performance petrol engine. Modern Diesel engines with CDI fuel injection do have engine problems and require expensive repairs. My boss has a Citroen with a 2.5 litre turbodiesel engine with 130 hp. The car is 250.000 km old (155.000 miles), and now he needed a new cylinder head for 3k dollars.
As modern Diesel engines deliver the same (or more) power as their petrol colleagues, their longeviety (spelling?) will go down to a similar level. OTOH: 25 years ago, a car in Germany with 100.000 km on the clock generally was at the end of its life. Today everybody expects at least twice of that.
Frank
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25 years ago, a properly maintained Mercedes diesel with 100k-km on it wasn't even broken in yet!
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wrote:

How are the current ciesels holding up to the legend of the older ones? Are they going to make 300k-500k easy or are they wearing out more quickly? MB will have diesels back in the US next year or year after, yes?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (sdp1s) wrote in

I know very little about the current models. Its been awhile since they sold them here.
By the way things look, we may never see them here again.
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And diesel sales are rising rapidly, with diesels outselling petrol-engined cars in several European countries already.
In the UK in the upper-middle to top class diesel overtook petrol in September, and that's WITHOUT the price advantage diesel enjoys in other European countries.
The overall advantage of diesel isn't that great with smaller cars/engines anyway, according to that article.
DAS --
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NB: To reply directly replace "nospam" with "schmetterling"
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On Mon, 3 Nov 2003 11:21:04 -0000, "Dori Schmetterling"

Gasoline in Europe is running equal to about $4.25 per gallon US. Is their diesel fuel much cheaper or is the longevity of diesels the reason for their popularity over there?
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Main reasons for popularity varies.
In some countries fuel price is a factor; for a fleet operator this could be significant, though weighed against that have to be extra diesel car costs (in the way of extra taxes on the cars and/or higher price over petrol/gasoline 'equivalent'.).
In other places, e.g. Britain, where diesel fuel is similar to petrol, the perceived longevity may be more important, as well as the better fuel economy (mpg, not fuel price). Of course that means you really have to do high mileage to make the diesel car pay. Modern petrol cars live longer than before and the more complex modern diesel engines may not last as long as before.
Another factor, which may or may not be relevant is the mid-range pulling power of diesel engines. In real life (as opposed to traffic-light races) the ability to accelerate quickly from, say, 40 or 50 mph when overtaking on a non-motorway-type road, is important, and diesels do that quite well.
DAS --
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NB: To reply directly replace "nospam" with "schmetterling"
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84 300 SD 345,000 miles original motor and tranny. Was rear ended by a Honda (totaled) Honda that is. Now if I rear ended a Honda???????? High mileage and safety. Only MB
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I am no longer impressed by 200000 miles cars. Far from being an exclusive M-B attribute. Even a 13K$ Honda (gas) will pass 250000 miles. I wonder if there is a link like this for M-B?
http://hondabeat.com/highmiles.php

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On Mon, 3 Nov 2003 16:19:26 -0500, "Saintor"

Within that 250,000 miles how many CV joints and timing belts would that Honda go through compared to differentials and timing chains in the Benz?

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wrote:

exclusive
wonder
CV Joints changes are not a major issue and are rare on 1996 newer models. You certainly know that Mercedes have issues as well, right?
As for timing belts, well let's says that their changes at each 100000 miles hurt the savings from low gas consumption, but there is still some money left :o) Anyway recent nippon engines have a chain 1.8L (Corolla) / 2.4L (Camry) / 2.0L (RSX/Civic) / 2.4L (Accord). Also, it is a good thing to change the chain every 150000-200000 miles.
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wrote:

exclusive
wonder
CV Joints changes are not a major issue and are rare on 1996 newer models. You certainly know that Mercedes have issues as well, right?
As for timing belts, well let's says that their changes at each 100000 miles hurt the savings from low gas consumption, but there is still some money left :o) Anyway recent nippon engines have a chain 1.8L (Corolla) / 2.4L (Camry) / 2.0L (RSX/Civic) / 2.4L (Accord). Also, it is a good thing to change the chain every 150000-200000 miles.
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What a bunch of crap re: Hondas.
M-B Diesels (and just about any other diesel) last a long time because they're engineered better, with better construction materials. They make power & torque differently than gasoline motors.
I've got a 16 year old Chevy pickup truck with 264K miles on it. I've got two MB diesels. '85 300SD w/254K and a '86 300SDL w/202K.
I've owned Hondas and they're great cars.
They all last just fine with the required maintenance and necessary repairs.
The M-B's, in my opinion maintain their consistency and their classic good looks much better than the Hondas. The leather interiors and lack of plastics in their construction keeps them in far superior condition than the Hondas with their cloth interiors that fade & crack at 3-5 years and plastics that warp. Note: Put a MB Diesel engine in a brand new Honda & ten years later the engine will be the only thing still in great shape. The materials Honda makes their less expensive cars with do not last.
Now, if Honda decided to make a diesel engine, I've got no doubt that they would be extraordinary motors. Mechanically, I can not find fault with anything they've built.
With the M-B's, you have an older car that will probably look good, drive good, feel good, and more importantly, make the owner feel good because it is a M-B. The 13K Honda is just that, the same Honda that millions other are driving. One of the masses. Besides, the cottage industry supporting the older M-B's out there is alot more fun to play in that working on old Hondas.
FWIW, of the 3 vehicles that I have, I'll get in my Chevy truck and drive cross country & back with more confidence than all the others.
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This would imply the fact that every single car maker maes more engineering efforts and take better material for the diesel engines than for the gas engines. I seriously doubt that. I also doubt that a new 220 CDI engine will outrun an old 240D engine in terms of longevity.
Frank
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Because of a few features: The engine is lubricated with oil and the engine runs on diesel oil (home heating oil) so the engine is constantly lubricated inside. It doesn't require as much fuel as a gas engine because the diesel is a compression engine not a spark plug ignited engine. The engine is a straight line, upright and requires fewer internal parts for it to work. Mercedes USA told me that I should expect my 6 cylinder turbo diesel to go at least 400,000 miles before I need to have the head rebuilt or replaced. P.

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