Winter Salt and Rust Proofing

Hi,
I just brought my 126k 84 300SD from a local mechanic who told me that my car will rot faster than it will mechanically break. Does anyone have any experience with driving in winter slush and body decay speed
of these older Benzes?
I would like to rust-proof the car as much as I possibly can. At this point, I'm aware of only 2 ways to help it rust slower - frequent examination for chips and dings & touchup AND keeping it waxed.
I figured I'd get an early start on spraying mufflers with Rustoleum before they start dumping salt on roads in October.
Thanks.
Mia J.
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if you like the car don't drive t in the salt peroid!
the case, minus a few cans!
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Easily said. But if one has only the one car?
DAS
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It's a 1984. Depending on where it's been, it might be too late already to worry about this.
If the car is rust free now, then the best bet is to keep it off the roads where salt is used. Or if you hate that idea, thoroughly washing the undercarriage after the winter season will help a bit.
These cars have quite a bit of metal in them and aren't exactly flimsy... STILL ROAD SALT WILL EAT YOUR CAR.
Marty
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Gotcha. I was thinking maybe there's wheelwell spray, or underbody paint, etc. to help protect it.
Mia
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I agree with Joseph. It's probably too late to do anything along the lines you are thinking that will significantly impact the car's life or be cost effective. One additional thing to make sure of, and that is that no water accumulates inside the car from any leaks. I'm in the process of fixing a couple of leaks in my 80 300SD. Water can get into the car from A/C drain leaks, windshield leaks, etc. A little usually isn't going to kill it. However, if it gets down into the floorboard area, it can just sit there and you may not even be aware of it. The carpet is so thick in these cars, it can hide it. You should also check inside the trunk after a good rain occasionally too.
I recently pulled some parts off a salvage 300SD and noticed both the driver and passenger floorboard areas were totally rusted through. I was left wondering if that happened from the outside in, or the inside out. My guess is it happened from the inside and may have been what killed the car.
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there is a rubber bung in the rear wheel wells which come lose in time. Inevitably, the water can enters there into the 'tunnel' that carries the wiring and vacum hoses. My past experience.
cheers
ps I do have a leak in the rear that leaves water in the trunk on either side in the 'wheel wells'..... can't find the source. any idea??
cheers, guenter

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Guenter,
On my 420 SEL, the floor of the trunk gets wet, and the reason appears to be that the rubber gasketing around the rim is loose and folded over. I was advised that I do not have to replace the gasket but, instead, remove it and clean it, clean the surface underneath of dirt and rust, and glue it back in with Old Yeller. Old Yeller is the name used by old mechanics around here for 3M's venerable and famous (yellow) contact cement. Comes in a tube.
Good luck.
Jim

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snipped-for-privacy@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca (Guenter Scholz) wrote:

Have you checked the rubber on the rear windscreen?
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CHECK the deal around the trunk lid AND the TAIL LIGHT COVERS
the case, minus a few cans!
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Thanks for the tip. Good point, i looked this morning and see some grey stuff (mildew?) on each corner of the rear window at the bottom.... could be signs of moisture.... I'll try to squeeze some silicon rubber into the seal.
cheers, guenter

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On Wed, 11 May 2005 13:35:01 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca (Guenter Scholz) wrote:

Silicon rubber may not be your best way to protect metal. The standard product accelerates corrosion. I once talk to a engineer from GE that told me that a better product for the application was being designed.
Sorry but I cant help any further but I know from experience that I found rust under the silicon. May be if the surface is painted and the silicon doesn't touch the bare metal, it will work.
Vlad

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    I followed up on this quite a bit a number of years ago. MB's advice is not to get drilled/oiled there is enough wax etc in the door panels already and the oil is likely to gum up possible motors etc. MB uses extensive rustproofing already (possibly not on yours yet, but not sure) and they thought the best is to wash it weekly in a car wash with undercarriage spray.
On th other hand, my 89' 300E is pristine showroom condition because of doing just that - and not driving it in winters - but of course then you might become paranoid to have an accident since the car is only worth maybe US $8K or thereabouts..... in short, drive it and enjoy it.
cheers, guenter
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On W126... common rust spot are in the wheelwell area... particularly the rear wheelwell... on the corner where it meets the trunk side pocket.. sands and salt get trapped there and rust there... mine did on both side... repaired it with fiberglass bondo... works great. Along with rubber undercoating.
Rubber undercoating in wheel well area is excellent idea, but only when you thoroughly wash it... nook and cranny.
In front wheel well, it is located on the front corner where bumper is...both side too.
Otherwise, no... I don't see any other problem of rusting as I do drive in winter... wash whenever I can to keep salt off my car... I have been driving my car for full 13 years before I sold it... I repaired all rust spots before I handed it off to next owner... I really want to see that car last.
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what i use for undercoating cars etc is a mixture of used engine oil and wax(toilet seal) i mix 2 toilet seals with about 1/2 gallon of oil and heat it to melt the wax into the oil then spray the car all underneath it and in all the doors through holes i droll in the doors etc.I do about 30 or so cars etc a year and it seems to last at least 2 years on the car and i live in possibly the worst place in the world for rust and road salt etc Nova Scotia Canada.Pul plastic under the car before spraying it and you will get none on the ground at all,any spills on the groung it quickly congeals and you just pic it up and dispose of it
Mia wrote:

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