Chrysler Reliability?..

Yes, BUT I say in Dan's defense that he has given you all a lot of good advice over the years. None of us are always right :)
Bill


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stop.
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nobody
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Daniel J. Stern wrote:

Unfortunately, with the problem being intermittent, proper diagnosis has thus far been elusive.
Matt
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Bill wrote:

Seems OK at first and worse when the engine is warm and worst when the OAT is above 85.
Unfortunately, it isn't a failure mode that has thus far set a code. And it is intermitten which makes troubleshooting a challenge.
Matt
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EGR isn't allowed to operate until the engine has been running for a few minutes (each year's specs are different). The EGR valve is feed with engine vacuum. When the solenoid is turned off (not energized) no vacuum gets thru to the EGR valve. Once the solenoid is energized vacuum is still blocked by the fact that there is no exhaust backpressure. When there is no exhaust backpressure to the EGR valve, the vacuum let thru by the solenoid is vented to the atmosphere. As backpressure increases due to throttle opening (simple explanation), more vacuum is routed to the EGR valve to open the valve. The most EGR flow occurs at part to mid throttle. With no throttle, there is no backpressure = no EGR flow. At high throttle openings there is very little vacuum supply so very little EGR flow. The backpressure vale and the solenoid are the black plastic piece at the EGR valve. The backpressure valve is spring loaded (by an internal spring) to the vacuum bleed position. Typically the spring (inside) rusts out and can stick in any position between full bleed and full EGR. So when it goes bad, it can show itself as just a rough idle, intermittent rough idle, stall at every stop or intermittent stall at a stop. Sooooo, someone (that knows what they are looking at) needs to verify correct operation of the EGR valve or you can spend the money and just have someone (or yourself) replace it (especially if the vehicle has high mileage). They should be replaced at between 100K and 125K miles anyway. (no that isn't in the maintenance schedule and that's a whole nother argument for another place and time).
Bill

when
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Matt Whiting wrote:

Ours acted up when warm - at idle or while driving - and when hot outside. The hotter it was, the worse it acted. When cool, no problem. Your problem sounds more and more like what we went through.
RP
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On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 19:23:28 -0400, Matt Whiting

Engine vacuum operates the EGR. So, coasting in, with no load, engine has higher vacuum. Also, in gear the engine is under load. Sticking EGR reduces the power output of the engine - it MAY run with no load, yet still stall under load (in gear). My '88 had just that stalling problem - so did my '95 pontiac. Replacing the EGR solved the problem on both. (actually, the EGR valve on one, and a vacuum control gizmo of some sort on the other)
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Matt Whiting wrote:

Ours did the 12 55 continually when giving all the problems. Former dealer couldn't/wouldn't do anything so the other dealer took over. I should also point out that the new dealer found a part that the former dealer rplaced with a new part that they broke while installing. Rather than replace the part they just let it go.
RP
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Been buying Chrysler products since 1987.
Had the head gasket problem also at about 60K on a 1997 Neon Sport (DHOC engine)....which is a known common problem...replaced under 70K extended warranty.
Had AC problems on a 1987 Grand Caravan V6 (1st year for the Grand and the V6)...repaired twice under extended warranty...then gave up again after it was out of warranty at 82K (didn't fix it after that). Started burning a little oil by the time we sold it...but the people we sold it to drove it for several more years and said it was one of their more reliable vehicles they'd ever owned.
Other problems...not many?
1989 Dakota 4x4...Timing chain went at 130K (which is unusual) Went through pittman arms for some reason too. No other problems. 1997 Grand Caravan 3.3...Sticking lifters at 30K...replaced under warranty (I attributed this one to my 4 mile winter commutes and not changing the oil often enough to prevent sludge) 2003 Stratus...Cabin blower fan at 2K...replaced under warranty loose/leaking tranny coolant couplings...dealer tightened. 2004 Sebring...None so far
Other Family Members
Mother in Law...1989 Dodge Aries...still driving it don't know the service details, but she isn't complaining that the car is a problem Son 1996 Dakota V8. Water pump at 85K. Bought it used so don't know what happened to it before 50K Daughter 2000 Neon. Clutch cable problem...nothing else. She has about 80K on it at the moment
Neighbors
1996 Caravan - 190K miles..abuses it as his weekend hauler for home improvement projects. Often comes down the street sitting awfully low from weight. He recently bought a SAAB 9.5 wagon and was going to trade the Caravan... but changed his mind and decided it was too good of a vehicle to get rid of just yet.
So, all-in-all, reliability seems to be quite good if you ask me! I've not seen any of the electrical or transmission problems you have. I think 1995 was the 1st year for the neon...I wouldn't buy a 1st or 2nd year model run from ANY manufacturer...they statistically have the greatest number of problems. I'd stay away from the new 300 for a couple of years...let them work the kinks out The Pacifica? I'd wait one more year before buying that one too.
| Hey all, | Back in 1995, my wife and I bought a Neon - the first Chrysler product | in my family in 2 generations (primarily we were a GM family). | A fun, cheap car that was a PITA until we got rid of it. Electric | problems (radio would cut out; cruise stopped working), blew a head | gasket, and by the end the transmission was slipping when it rained... | There are more, but that gives you an idea. | Unfortunately, almost every person I know who's had a | Chrysler/dodge/jeep product has a similar story. I had a cherokee, and | it had fuel pump/tranny problems. By Bro.-in-law's durango? | Computer,ABS,Distributor,Electric problems. The Trucks - the same | story. | | I LOVE what Chrysler is doing now - the Pacifica especially. The 300 | is gorgeous in person....But I'm just afraid of the quality. | | What do ya'll think? Has it improved substantially? After our | Neon/Cherokee experience, we've had a Mazda (one of my fav. cars | ever), our Honda, and I bought a used (cheap) Focus...So I'm not | totally turned off from American:)! | Jon
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"James C. Reeves" wrote:

The paradox is that about the time they have the kinks worked out is about the time they start de-contenting! 8^)
Bill Putney (to reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with "x")
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I was looking at the Pacifica and saw some of the last 300M's on the lot. The assembly quality was pretty bad. Especially trim around the front and back windshields. I don't think they has lost any features though in the last year and gained hinged side mirrors in 2000 compared to my 99.

I'd
kinks out

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Jon Patrick wrote:

We had a '98 Neon and it was a good little car. Never had any trouble with it. We now have two Chrysler minivans ('00 and '02) and both have been relatively trouble free. We did have an issue of a leaking intake manifold gasket and a faulty EGR valve, but both were fixed under warranty years ago.
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On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 02:20:02 +0200 (CEST), Nomen Nescio

Hudson did exactly what you describe in their "Super Six" engines of 1929 to 1954. They had a water manifold bolted to the side of the block below the intake maniford. Inside the manifold was a diverter plate with appropriate holes, squirting water at the various cylinders. However, they didn't use stainless steel for the diverter plate. Eventually, they'd rust out and the engine would overheat, simply requiring a new diverter plate.
BTW, their cylinder bocks weren't simply made of cast iron. The blocks were cast of "chromalloy". A chrome/cast iron alloy.
Also, their piston rings were pinned so they wouldn't rotate. The theory was that they'd seat better and without the possibility of the end gaps lining up.
Believe it or not, these engines were sort of "splash lubricated" with a low pressure oil pump charging an oil gallery that ran longitunally along the bock. The oil dropped thru tubes into smalll pans mounted just above the bottom of the main oil pan. In each oil drip pan was a small device that looked like a "jack-in-the-pulpit" that deflected oil up to the the crankshaft, the rod and the wristpin.
Thus their headgaskets did have a minimal number of holes in it.
I had a 1937 Hudson Terraplane - only sold it about 5 years ago. At 87,000 miles I dropped the oil pan, and plastigauged the main bearings (there were only three main bearings for the 6 cylinder engine but they were MASSIVE bearings). The center (thrust) main was worn to about 5 thousands clearance so I simply pulled out shims to adjust it to a clearance of 1 thousandth. Considering the type of lubrication and the lack of any oil filter, I considered the wear rate to be pretty low. It looked like I could pull shims out of that bearing's shim pack at least two or three more times.
I once pulled a Jeep Wrangler out of a snow drift with that '37 Hudson - it weighed over two tons. It also out accelerated my friend's 1985 Mazda GLC and the other econobuckets of the day. The Hudson engine had a three inch bore and a FIVE inch stroke, giving it high torque at relatively low speeds. I could leave it in third gear down to 15 miles an hour and then smoothly accelerate to top speed (around 95MPH). It was also kind of neat to drive around in a car that had a Zeppelin as a hood ornament. Hudson sold a lot of them for use as police cars in the 1930's.
There is some tie in to Chrysler here. Hudson and Nash merged in 1954 to create American Motors, bought by Chrysler around 1988.
Ah, those good old days.... :-)
Doug
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Ah, memories. I had a '37 Hudson Terraplane business-man's coupe - actually a 2 door coach with no back seat, but a lot of room for sample cases. Hydraulic valve lifters used to clatter pretty good when first started, and that open frame bell housing (helped cool the wet disk clutch - cork facings in "hudsonite" fluid) let the sound of the starter out for everyone within a mile to hear - and due to the ratio between the starter and flywheel it was a "hunting gear set" meaning the same pair of teeth never meshed 2 rotations of the crank in a row.

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Jon Patrick) wrote in message

From 1989 to 1996 I drove a '88 Dodge Daytona Shelby Z. Fast car, passed everything but a repair shop. Broke down a lot. Was leary of another Mopar product but in 2001 I bought a '98 Cirrus. It has been the best car I've ever owned and extremely reliable.
Gene DiGennaro Baltimore, Md.
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Own a 99 300M. 42k miles. Purchased 11/98. Bought an extended warranty on it but so far haven't used it once. Power windows were a problem first year though and covered under regular warranty. Goodyear tires had to be replaced by Goodyear. When new ones started vibrating I switched to Michelin. So did Chyrsler in later years.

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