Yukon Widow Hinge Adhesive

2001 Yukon, liftgate with lift window.
Window hinges appear to be secured to window with adhesive. One of my hinges has broke free from the window. No damage to window or hinge.
I have attempted to reattach with a two part epoxy from Hi-Lo (held two days) as well as JB Weld (two days as well).
The dealer does not sell this adhesive and suggests replacing the window ($627).
Does anyone know of a suitable product for this application?
I have a call in to 3M Auto group as well.
Thanks!
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Maybe a dentist? They have some pretty radical adhesives.

hinges
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Most auto parts stores sell adhesive for re-attaching rearview mirrors. Just a couple of bucks. The trick is proper surface prep (read directions carefully).
Regards, Al.
On Wed, 23 Jul 2003 01:34:05 GMT, "Steve Ortmann"

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Steve Ortmann wrote:

Epoxy is for rough and/or porous surfaces. Glass is neither. You should have used a cyanoacrylate with thermal hardening characteristics like rear view mirror glue (as Al H. said). Unfortunately, there is no good way to remove the epoxy residue. The only solvent for epoxy is alcohol (iso, methyl, ethyl, etc.). It will soften and remove epoxy that has not been heat hardened.
If you get the epoxy off and decide to use a cyano, make sure you heat the surfaces after applying the cyano and clamping the unit. Continue heating for about 12 hours. A small light bulb in a reflector works well.
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...and speaking of cyanoacrylate, aka superglue, (also used for advanced latent print finding in crime labs).... Superglue and cellophane make a VERY good band aid on cuts that might otherwise need stitches.
GW
Paul wrote: Epoxy is for rough and/or porous surfaces. Glass is neither. You should have used a cyanoacrylate with thermal hardening characteristics like rear view mirror glue (as Al H. said). Unfortunately, there is no good way to remove the epoxy residue. The only solvent for epoxy is alcohol (iso, methyl, ethyl, etc.). It will soften and remove epoxy that has not been heat hardened.
If you get the epoxy off and decide to use a cyano, make sure you heat the surfaces after applying the cyano and clamping the unit. Continue heating for about 12 hours. A small light bulb in a reflector works well.

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Best bet is clean off epoxy with razor blade / sandpaper and go to an auto glass store. They buy glue in big quantity, and can often do job for less than price of D I Y glue, which might / might not stick.
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