Jaguar Disappointments Abound

Hello:
I bought a Jaguar XJR new. This vehicle is Jaguar's top-of-the-line XJ sedan--at least from a performance (rather than luxury) perspective. New,
these vehicles are about $75,000.
However, I am increasingly disgusted with Jaguar as a company. Here are some recent examples:
* Call their 1-800-4-JAGUAR number and you will usually be connected with one of apparently several girls who sound as if they're about 20 years old. This wouldn't be a problem if it weren't for the fact that these girls know virtually nothing about Jaguar cars--yet Jaguar directs all of its car owners to this number for any questions related to their vehicle. Ask something about your Jaguar vehicle and if it's not the most basic question (such as its model number), she likely won't be able to help you. There is no escalation route from this number, so if you have any issues beyond model number, then she will tell you that you must take it up with a dealer. So the 4-Jaguar number is really only for directions or a tow, but it doesn't, as Jaguar purports, provide you with the kind of customer support you'd expect to receive when you call the manufacturer of your $75,000 car.
* Jaguar doesn't know about their own product. I recently had to have my alloy wheels repainted. I called 1-800-4-JAGUAR and the woman there argued with me that wheels aren't painted, they're "coated". She went as far to tell me that if I do paint them, then I will void their warranty. After, I called seven dealerships and not one of them could provide me with the paint code for my wheels because Jaguar apparently keeps that top-secret. Apparently, Jaguar doesn't want its customers to repaint their wheels when they can buy brand-new ones instead! (Repainting is required when a wheel has rim damage and is repaired; this process is usually $125 per wheel whereas Jaguar charges $695 per wheel). Instead, a wheel shoppe had to draw from its own palettes and mixtures and experience to determine the color of my wheel. Jaguar claims that they order the wheels pre-painted so they have "no way of knowing" its actual paint code. My wheels came with the car--they are Jaguar wheels, not a third party product.
* A woman at the 4-Jaguar number told me that she could not tell me whether a vibrating piece of dashboard trim was covered under my warranty. She told me I would have to bring the car to a dealership and let them make that determination. I had the actual part and part number, but she still could not tell me whether or not it would be covered under warranty. When I explained that I'm about an hour's drive from the nearest dealership, she did not make any offer to do any research. She kept repeating to me in her Brittney-Spears accent, that I would need to visit the dealership. When I explained exactly which part it is (it's the single piece of trim that goes over the speedometer and tachometer assembly) she told me that she doesn't have any information on that part. When I asked "Are you customer service" she said "No. We're 'customer assistance'." When I asked her what the difference between "customer service" and "customer assistance" is, she said "Is there anything else I can help you with, sir?"
* Dealerships don't know the product very well. The dealership I work with keeps laying off its service reps and hiring new ones. The guy I last spoke to at the dealership told me that he came from a local Honda dealership; his female co-worker was a waitress in a casino in Vegas before coming to Jaguar as a service rep. The service reps are your liaison to the service technicians, so if they don't know anything about your vehicle, chances are that things are not going to be fixed in the most efficient way. And certainly technical information cannot be conveyed in an accurate, professional way when the service reps don't even understand the terminology being used. I'd expect this from a Geo dealership--not Jaguar.
Ford lost 500 million dollars in their Jaguar unit in 2002, yet they staff their phone lines with neophytes and provide no escalation path for their supposedly valued customers. I suppose they have no money with which to hire better employees. However, they've apparently got quite deep pockets to continue to tell the world how great their cars are. The ads I see are in Forbes, The New Yorker, and now on prime-time television.
Cars of yesteryear, especially Jaguars, had a cache that they simply don't have anymore. I remember the older Jaguars and the people in the business of selling and servicing them. A pride exuded from all personnel with whom you interacted, and owning the product felt like a privilege. Today, Jaguar is just like any other car manufacturer. In fact, I received better treatment and encountered more qualified, knowledgeable personnel when I owned a Honda than with my current Jaguar. People understand the Honda product (the number of owners is certainly in Honda's favor), and they are pleasant and knowledgeable on top of that. Jaguar, in contrast, has an "attitude" that is not for the sophisticated or learned; it's not for the classy or discerning; it's for rich people who don't give a damn about customer care and who don't know anything about engines or technology. Most people (like me) are being duped by Jaguar's legacy, not realizing that the company is living in the shadow of its enviable past.
I bought my Jaguar thinking that I would begin a long-term journey with a respectable company and cherish the vehicle on which I had spent my hard-earned money... Instead, I am frustrated and insulted by Jaguar's attitude, their employees, dealerships, and former-waitress service reps. Jaguar should be EMBARRASSED by all of this.
Sadly, if they continue to bleed money at the seams, then I suppose the quality of their personnel will only continue to degrade. While my car is in warranty I have little worry because Jaguar need to absorb the cost of its own ineptitudes; I shudder to think about my future out-of-warranty repair bills and the inability of their service technicians to effectively diagnose and fix my vehicle. This makes me uncertain whether I want to keep the vehicle or swap it for another brand.
I thought I would be a lifetime customer of Jaguar, but, sadly, my continued negative experiences each time I interact with the company has led me to consider another brand--and to no longer recommend the product as I once so enthusiastically did...
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Jim,
What year is your vehicle? What dealership did you buy it from?

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<snip the crap>
I STRONGLY suggest you sell that car immediately, and buy a Chevrolet. Plain simple cars, no affiliation with Ford or those dumb broads...
Also, the Chevy mob are used to complaints....
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Of all the people on this list, I am NOT one who generally defends the dealership. That being said, I can't for the life of me, figure out why you would be calling or expecting anything from the National number. I know of no manufacturer, including Mercedes, who has a national line to deal with the problems as you explain it here.
The wheels you are riding on may have originally come with the car. Like the radio, the wheels ARE made by some other third party manufacturer like BBS. The "painted wheels" are not painted at all and to think they are would be foolish. The finish would not last ten minutes. The girl at the phone center was indeed correct in both cases, the wheels are Powder Coated and not made by Jaguar. So you were wrong on both counts -- the Jag girl was correct.
As to the "vibrating" part. How do you expect a girt on a telephone 2000 to 3000 miles away from you to tell you if a part is in warranty or not? That is like my son in the XJ40 calling me on the phone and telling me there is a strange buzzing noise and wanting me to fix it over the telephone. It is MOST difficult to do. In the Jag case, there are legal ramifications for giving the kind of advice/opinion you are asking and she was wise not to tell you. If you live an hour from the dealership/ repair center than you should have expected to make a few trips for repairs. You knew that full well going in.
I can't disagree with you on the service of Jaguar dealerships. In this day and age of components, most dealerships including Jaguar, simply replace the entire module -- either under warranty or not. When I was looking to buy a used XJ40, I went the local dealership for advice on repairing the blown transmission. The response was that they had NO idea because they don't repair anything, they simply replace it. The cost to me would be $5000 plus labor. The same was true for dash lights. I was told they did not carry anything as old as 1994 and was sent to the local Radio Shack for bulbs. Jaguar, unlike Mercedes, does NOT cater to the used car owner market. It has been there downfall for years.
Now for your general comments. To think that the Jaguar attitude is any different today than it was 30 years ago is an effort in folly. I bought my 1st Jaguar in 1973 and I have to tell you that Jaguar parts and service is a far cry better today than it ever was back then. I had purchased a 1962 Mark II and I had driven an hour to talk to the Jaguar service people as to why the car would barely start and hardly run. They would not give me the time of day. It was not until nearly two weeks after that trip that I ran into another Jag owner who offered to look at the car. When I popped the bonnet he burst into laughter. With a wrench, he quickly reversed the terminals on the battery and grounded the car on the positive side. The original Mark II was a positive ground car -- but I had no manuals, no help and no experience dealing with such a thing. The Mark II fired right up and with a slight tweak to the SU carbs, ran like a dream. Please don't try to tell me that Jaguar has a "cache" from yesteryear. If you think that, then you have never heard the jokes regarding Lucas or the fact that Jag owners had to have 2 Jags -- one to drive whilst the other was in the shop.
Today's Jaguars are no different when it comes to service. While the cars are MUCH more reliable than the older models, you MUST get onto some lists with people in your area or find an independent garage that knows Jaguars. If you don't, you are headed for the "Money Pit" that has given Jaguar a bad reputation for 50 years now. If you DO find an independent garage that does good work for a fair price, you are then the proud owner of the best motorcar you have ever owned. When I first bought my XJ40, I replaced all the brake rotors, pads, accumulator, rear light modules, steering rack and a bunch of rubber parts. The total costs of the parts, which were equal to or better than Jaguar parts, was around $1,000. I did the installation myself. I then took the list to my local dealership and asked then for an estimate of the parts and labor for them to do the job. Their estimate -- a little over $7,000. But this is not Jaguar only!! The shift cable on my daughter's 1990 Honda accord was wearing out and she could not easily get the car out of Park. We took it to the local Honda dealer for an estimate: $300 for the Genuine Honda part and $200 for the labor for a total of $500. We then took it to an independent: $200 for the aftermarket part and $100 labor for a total of $300. I decided to do it myself. $53.60 for the aftermarket part off the Internet and $0 labor because I did it myself. The plastic bag that the part came in had the Honda logo on the label and the Honda part number so I am not so sure how aftermarket the part really was. Jaguar is no different.
Two weeks ago, my best friend bought a two year old Jaguar XJR. It is one of the MOST impressive Jaguars I have ever driven. Before he would even consider the purchase, he made me take him around to meet my list of repair garages that could work on the car so he could get a warm and fuzzy feeling about repairs. We even went to the dealership and talked to them to get a feel for the service and repair. We both left with the realization that we would never own a Jaguar if we had to deal with the them.
When it is all said and done, if you are expecting the same type service and repair that you got from Honda, then PLEASE sell your Jag now. You will NEVER be happy with it. If you want the finest production motorcar made, then continue to own the Jag and find some support outside Jaguar. There is NOTHING like driving a Jaguar -- and I own 3 of them. Whether it is driving the XJ40 I let my son drive every day to High School or the 1967 Right Hand Drive Jaguar I drive every day around town, I would not trade either one for the silly little Japanese or Korean or for that matter European and American rolling pieces of junk made today.
In terms of your costs to repair. I can't help you there. I do all my own repairs on the Jaguars. I refuse to do the repairs on my Dodge Van because the Dodge is so poorly engineered. I DO know that the parts for any one of my Jags is far less or equal to the cost of the parts for my Japanese and American built cars. I can do an entire brake job with 4 new rotors and pads on any of my Jags for under $200. Just the front rotors on my Dodge van cost $300 and since the hub is built in, I have to replace the bearings as well. Terrible design on the Dodge. The rotors for your XJR are going to run you about $125 each for the front because they are so large and it is such a heavy - powerful motorcar.
You need to take a long hard look at what you have bought and decide that you are either going to make a commitment to it or walk away from it. Look for a Jag club near you in Nevada and they will be able to start you in the proper direction. Here is a link to the JCNA club list http://www.jcna.com/php/clublist.php Contact them and see what they are doing.
Cheers Webserve

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Webserve,
I think you missed most of the point of my letter.
For starters, you are wrong about the wheels. You insisted with such authority that I am wrong that I must set the record straight. The original factory wheels on my XJR are in fact PAINTED. I verified this with the dealership's parts department. There is a powder-coating technique that works by electrostatically charging the wheel before it is coated, but this is not done when wheels are repaired. As far as paint lasting "ten minutes"--that's just silly chatter. The near-undercarriage of the vehicle that runs between the wheels is ALSO painted, and that's exposed to almost as much debris (if not more) than the wheels because the front wheels tend to throw debris at that painted surface as the car navigates forward. I've driven the car not ten minutes but about ten two-month periods (that's about 600 days) and that painted surface on the chassis is just PERFECT. Also--my four refurbished and PAINTED wheels are also just fine. It's amazing what clear-coat can do. So, my comrade webserve, you, with all due respect, are absolutely positively wrong about the wheels on my vehicle.
As far as asking a girl 2000-3000 miles away (wow! that's quite a range--how did you arrive at that?), I didn't ask her to diagnose a vibration over the phone. You wrote what you wrote for dramatic effect. I had instead (as I wrote) mentioned a SPECIFIC part number for a SPECIFIC piece of trim that *I* determined to be faulty. I wanted to know from the "girl" whether that SPECIFIC part was covered under warranty. She certainly should be able to answer that question especially since she is at the phone number that I am required to call for all warranty issues. And if she did not know the answer, then in my opinion she is required to do whatever research is required and get back to me.
Now--I do thank you for your one helpful piece of information: that I should track down a Jaguar expert and go to that person for non-warranty repairs.
The gist of my letter had nothing to do with THE PRODUCT--in this case, an XJR "motorcar". I love the product. That wasn't my point.
My point was (and continues to be) that I am disappointed by the lack of professionalism exhibited by a company (Jaguar) that purports to cater to only the most sophisticated and discerning customer. Why a company like this would hire what sound to me like teenage girls to answer their customer's calls is beyond me. And why a company like this would not have a more respectable and well-documented escalation procedure is beyond me. Jaguar--who needs customers--should do its best to retain the ones they can somehow persuade in the first place. To present employees who "give attitude" and who sigh into the receiver and who are unwilling to do research is simply unacceptable.
The dealerships are less culpable, in my opinion, because they are (according to Jaguar) independently owned and operated. I just deplore most people involved in car sales anyway because they seem always to be smarmy and insincere.
Maybe I was wrong about the cache that Jaguar once had. I certainly know about Lucas electronics, but I was admittedly too young to know them as a customer. I did learn, when I was younger, that the Jaguar *product* had cache (cousins of mine had several)--and for the nearly 20 years to follow I sort of dreamed about owning one. Now that I do, I feel like I own just any car and not something special. At least that's the way the Jaguar company makes me feel. Interestingly, the dealership makes me feel that I bought something special. Even though they may not be the brightest people in the world, the dealership usually makes you feel valued--even if its insincere. But paying a premium on post-warranty repairs just to get that good feeling is sort of silly.
Jaguar--the company (not the dealership)--does a good job sending me all sorts of incentives to buy another one of their newest $75,000 sedans or even to trade-up. But they are the same people I cannot seem to contact or get accurate answers from about my vehicle. They point you to the dealership--but if you ever have a problem with the dealership then they say that they have nothing to do with the dealerships because they're independently owned and operated. My point is that there's got to be a better way to treat, respect, and retain customers who happen to love the product.
Jim

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Jim, I guess I am confused!! In your original post, you claimed that the wheels were "painted" from the factory and they were not 3rd party wheels. What I left out of my post is the fact that I do not know what kind of wheels you have on your XJR, but my friend's XJR has wheels that are powder-coated and manufactured by BBS out of Germany. His are the original wheels that came on the car. He, too, needed to have some curb scuff repair done and we confirmed with my powder coat guy, (who is powder coating the undercarriage for my 1967 S-Type so I do know what powder coating is) that it is indeed a powder coated finish. The same is true for my 1988 Jaguar XJ40 "painted" wheels. In terms of "painted wheels" being able to endure: I clear-coated the aluminum wheels on my Nissan 300ZX with POR-15 clear-coat which is specifically designed for wheels. After 2 years, you can see the chips from road wear. I had the wheels on my 1967 420 painted last spring and clear-coated as well and they too are starting to show wear.
In terms of the distance, I assumed that you were from Texas since your e-mail address is from texas.rr.com. The distance from San Antonio to Mahwah, New Jersey where Jaguar has it's North American headquarters is just about 2000 miles. If in fact you had been from California, the distance would have been closer to 3000. I can't imagine ANYONE giving advice, sight unseen as to the warranty status of a part over the phone. I would fire the first person who did that at my company (although I am not a car dealer). Warranty is a matter of determination. Warranty is a matter of seeing what the problem is. The seat belts on my 1988 Jaguar are STILL under warranty. That doesn't mean someone is going to extend an opinion over the telephone as to whether the parts qualify.
As for the rest of your post, as I said earlier, I can not defend the dealership network nor the company itself in terms of service or customer support. I have been dealing with Jaguars since 1973 when I bought my 1st one and I have never found a dealer that comes up to any sort of standard. The local dealer here actually brags on the fact that there is a 2-3 day waiting period for you to get your car back on service. I went in to buy a silly little dash light for my 420 and was told they don't sell parts for Mercedes. The parts guy had never heard of a Jaguar 420 nor did he know there was a 1960s version of the S-Type.
I totally agree with you that Jaguar service leaves much to be desired. Maybe that is one of the reasons Ford is closing Coventry.
Cheers Webserve

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I guess I did make things unecessarily confusing: My wheels came with the car so that is why I said they were not third-party wheels. I said that because some people buy a car and, new or not, they replace the wheels with some third-party ones. I did not do that. However, my wheels apparently are not manufactured by Jaguar even though they are sold with the car when it is new. So, they're third-party wheels in the sense that Jaguar doesn't make them but they're first-party wheels in the sense that Jaguar supplies them when the car is new. I suppose the same goes for the transmission, which is actually made by Daimler.
I think there are a number of ways to refurbish a wheel and I believe you that your wheels are powder-coated. But mine are not. Mine are painted--not with a spray can (as my father's Mercedes 280SE hubcaps were), but with the same process body shops use to paint a car's chassis (however, I think the wheels get an extra layer of clear-coat). Perhaps they will chip in time--but so far they haven't. They're finish is admirably rugged.
You say you'd fire the first person to express a warranty opinion over the warranty phone line because they should have to "see" the warranty issue first... I agree in general but I disagree in my example: When I call that number and I ask "Is part number 123-123-123 covered under the manufacturer's warranty", they should be able to say: "Let me look that up... Yes! That part is covered!". If I say "I hear a noise, is that covered?", then I understand that the rep on the other end of the phone would have no basis on which to say "yes" or "no". But I never suggested that they should in very generalized cases...
Even "seeing" is not a definitive answer. A colleague of mine had some damage to an interior kick-panel and one dealership said that it is covered under the warranty and another dealership said that it is not. Both "saw" the same car and the same kickpanel!
When you have a Jaguar, it would be nice if the dealership (the Jaguar-company liaison, essentially) responded more often with: "We will make it right." No argument, no attitude, no audible sighs. Just "We will make it right, and you WILL be satisfied." Wouldn't that be great? Wouldn't that kind of treatment make it more likely that you'd buy another Jaguar? And wouldn't we hear more positive stories of customer experiences with Jaguar rather than negative ones?
I guess we're agreeing on the big issues--which, again, has to do with the cognitive dissonance between Jaguar's marketing message and reality. It's a shame: they've got such an excellent product but that don't have the human infrastructure to support it because the product is too sophisticated, classy, and advanced--and in general the people representing, dealing, and repairing it are not.
My biggest fear is not being able to escalate any issue with the car once it is out of warranty. I don't get the feeling that Jaguar wants people to keep their vehicles beyond warranty, because they don't seem to provide any sort of escalation path beyond their witless girls at the 1-800-4-JAGUAR number. (I'm sure I will be able to call or wite to the Ford Motor Company and start at the top--but I don't get a sense that anyone would appreciate receiving such a call or letter.)
So it raises the question: Is there truly a vehicle you can buy and experience truly knowlegeable, product-savvy company reps and top-notch technicians? Does one need to buy a Bentley, Maybach, or Rolls Royce to experience what I expected to get from Jaguar?
Jim

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Hi Jim,
I understand the frustration you feel, however it is a disgusting trend slowly reaching all corporations. Sometimes it is amazing that companies make any profits at all.
Here is an example how a corporate client of mine handled a problem (Name with held due to contract agreement)
In the robotic department at a large papermill - a forklift driver crashed into an automatic roll up door and destroyed the wind motor. The cost of the motor was only $100 US dollars and could have easily been replaced and back in action the very next day. But this tale will show you American corporate thinking.
The department head sent in a repair request to his supervisor for approval. Once the supervisor approves it he sends the request to purchasing for the next level of approval. Once purchasing approves the repair is it forwarded to a folder where an executive committee with talk it over and approve it. If the committee feels so, they will delegate it to another lessor committee who then forward it to corporate headquarters for further processing. Of course these committees are working to hide expenses and debt from investors to look good, so the process might take a while. Corporations also like to take their money and make short term investments, and only when they get their returns do they pay bills and make repairs.
So what about the door? Well first off the robots need to operate in a warm enviroment but the door was open wide in December!. So they installed 8 massive 480V electric heaters so production could continue. 6 months later the door was repaired. You dont need to do math to realize how expensive the electric bill was for the heat. Companies simply step over 10,000 dollar bills to pick up a quarter.
So when you question why you got a ditz blonde for support, you can be comforted to know that it was because of greedy execs. Millions are spent on research to see how cheap a product can be made before the customers react. Ford has lost interest in taking Jag upwards, they only care about numbers. If they were going upwards the would be no X-type, no S-type(Candy coated Ford's). Look at the Jaguar badges, they are oval. Just be happy you did not get your call routed to India for support. ;-)
I must correct you below-

It is a ZF6HP 6 speed made by the Zeppelin Co. in Friedrichschafen, Germany.
DieInterim
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Thank you for taking a moment to share your thoughts. Yes, indeed, corporations are unbelievably wasteful.
Thank you also for clarifying my transmission manufacturer.
Jim

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In overall terms you may be correct but I can certainly relates to Jim's concerns in his original posting.
Back in the early 90s I wanted to re-paint my XJ-S wheels, so I phoned Jaguar from where I live in the UK. The customer service department sounded like it was staffed by highly knowledgeable senior staff, who were exceptionally helpful. On the question of the wheels, the gentleman said he would make enqurires and get back to me. He did, too. He wrote me a letter explaining in some detail that the (then) process involved dangerous isocyanates which it would not be safe for me to use. He also provided the contact details for a firm who could do the work for me. This isn't a story from a by-gone age. It's only about tem years ago! But pre-Ford, of course. 10/10 for customer service. The last time I phoned (post Ford) I had a very similar experience to Jim's. The customer service desk is merely a contact point. They refer everything back to the dealers (main agent garages) and sound wet behind the ears. They know nothing. 1/10 for customer service c.2002.
Regards George
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Jim,
You experience is typical of the culture that most big companies adopt these days - Good old fashioned customer service goes out the window and in comes a bloody machine asking us to press 1,2 or 3.
If I ever have to speak to a company who has one of these machines, I usually just wait until I get a human - Or press any button I feel like.
I have actually moved my bank when they put one of these machines in, and also now deal with a local insurance broker who charges me 20 per more per year but gives excellent service.
Industry take note - Your pissing us off and we pay your mortgage !!!
Stuart

some
old.
know
question
model
doesn't,
paint
draw
of
have
car--they
whether
told
goes
said
spoke
his
Jaguar
are
terminology
hire
of
you
Honda
number
is
discerning;
don't
in
diagnose
continued
so
-------------------

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Ive liked my 88 Jaguar XJ40 just fine, although this is likely because the previous owners have probably spent about as much repairing it as the car cost when new. Its the blown BMW transmission in it that sucks ass. At 150k miles and meticulously maintained, this should not be. A Chevrolet will do way better than that. Its for sale, cheap. Located an hour west of Nashville, Tennessee. Regards, Nathan
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Nathan Bates) wrote in message

Actually Nathan, the transmission is not a BMW make. It is made by ZF, or "Zeppelin Freidrichschafen". And yes it is the very Zepplin company of lore.
It is my experience that transmissions commonly fail about that milage, but there are cases of others going on for more.
About your Chevy remark- Perhaps you speak of the older TH's, but you'll have a hard time finding a Chev transmission today that will reach 150k! Just hunt around the forums on the net and you'll be shocked to find how common transmission failures are in American cars today. The Chev 700r is a real POS. Plastic does not belong in a transmission yet American cars use it inside theirs.
I know where a used $500 trans is Nathan....replacing yours should be cheaper than buying another car.
Regards, Blake (DieInterim)
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Actually Blake, You are correct. The ZF transmission was used by Jaguar, BMW and Volvo. All 3 manufacturers sent out a "TECH" bulletin regarding these transmissions. The problem first became evident with BMWs in the California emissions testing. BMW quickly discovered that if you rev the engines with the ZF transmission attached at higher than 2500 RPM for more than 2 minutes, while in Park or Neutral, you will burn out the transmissions. Of course every inspection jockey was doing this and it was causing transmissions to go. I understand the State of California released guidelines regarding these cars to prevent the problem. The '88 and '89 Jags have the same ZF transmission. Any State that has emissions testing has to be careful to not allow the problem to happen. Whenever I take my car in for inspection I make the inspection guys aware of the problem. Thankfully, here in North Carolina, my XJ40 has only 1 more emission test since they are phasing out emissions for any car made prior to 1996. When I was looking at a 2nd '88 XJ40 that was being sold that had a bad transmission, I found 4-5 transmissions with fairly low miles on them for $300. AAMCO offered to put the transmission in for an other $300. So I figured $600 plus the cost of the car would be a good deal until the guy decided he wanted $2000 for the car.
Cheers Webserve

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Its not the transmission replacement that bothers me as much as the fact that these cars seem to continously have some high dollar doo-dad breaking on them. I have the repair bills here for such things as $400 lamp modules. GM can make a bulb blink just fine with a $3 blinker. I just dont want to be aggravated to death by something always breaking on it. Thats why the first $750 cash that shows up takes it. Has a brand new battery and rear pads, by the way. I agree on the GM 700r transmission. Thats what my old faithful 83 Buick wagon has. Im on my third transmission since 1995. But the rebuild I had done in 1999 has held up well. This old car is ragged but starts and goes every time you get in it. And Im responsible for the ragged part. Old thing looked new when I bought it, I just worked it and myself to death (Im a carpenter/remodeler). Best Regards, Nathan
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I have a 2001 XJ8 which I purchased new, and have had problems with Customer Service...would given anything had I taped THAT conversation!! Result was, she hung up on me after apparently tiring of giving me the same non-answer several times, and I stubbornly kept trying to get an answer. The car was delivered to me new with a repainted RR fender, and I suppose I should have known better than to expect satisfaction. Furthermore, my dealer in Sacramento can't seem to get the steering wheel straight after a re-alignment, although they have made 3 attempts since some bushing was replaced due to a factory tech order. The same dealer has left me with, alternately, 1 quart of oil low/high after the 10k, 20k, AND 30k mile checkup. I love the car, but will not be buying another. I do not, however, know which luxury car to buy to assure an improvement in service.

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Hi CB,
With respect to the steering wheel, it is an interesting problem. I bought a 5-year unlimited alignment package from NTB for $149. They are able to do exceptional alignments. I know if you have had frame damage, it can cause the camber to be out-of-range of adjustment, and I wonder if that's the case with your vehicle?
I don't understand how a new XJ could have a repainted RR fender unless it was somehow damaged during a test-drive. How do you know it's been repainted? I can't imagine that a Jaguar rep wouldn't inspect and replace/repaint that fender because if it doesn't match then it needs to be redone at Jaguar's expense. It's ridiculous to think that Jaguar would allow a mis-matched fender to leave the lot.
Surely there are other dealerships in your area that can help you while your vehicle is still in warranty...

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CB, As I am sure you have ascertained from reading this site, you need to stay as far away from the dealership as possible. After I changed the steering rack on my 1988 XJ40, I took it to my local garage. These are "NASCAR" guys at their finest southern best -- but they DO know cars. Once they computer aligned the front end, they simply aligned the steering wheel with the adjustment Jaguar built into the rack!!!!! Mine is an ADWEST rack -- I am not sure of the newer ones.
After I removed the entire front end of my 1967 Jaguar and replaced it all with new bushings, shocks, etc I once again headed down to these guys. I had the original service manual so I had the specs for the alignment. Once again, we put the figures into the computer and aligned the front. This time it was a bit more difficult because I had removed the entire front and rear suspensions to re-build them. Together, we did a 4 wheel alignment and the car has tracked true and never had any shake or shimmy. Total cost for the '67 alignment: $59. ALLDATA has all the specs right on the CD so any competent garage should be able to do the work. The trick is to find a competent garage. When I first searched for my '88, I was given quotes from $400 to $600. Most garages are afraid to work on Jags for some reason. I find them easier than my Dodge or my daughter's Chevy.
There is something definitely wrong with your dealership. You need to contact a local Jag club and find out where they get their work done. These cars are TOO magnificent to be ruined by bad service.
Cheers Webserve

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