PowerLite starter motor.

Anyone had one of these apart? They're aftermarket types often used to replace early series wound Lucas types. They use a Jap permanent magnet high speed motor with reduction gearing, so rather kinder on the battery.
Mine is out of warrenty, and sticks occasionally. Motor runs, but pinion not engaged. It got quite a bit of oil on it, and the garage cleaned it when sorting the leak. But that could be coincidence.
It's a awkward job to change on the street. So don't want to take it out only to find it can't be fixed and then have to order up a new one.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
Presumably it's the inertia type rather than a pre-engagement starter with a solenoid and fork?
The pinion is on a spiral on the shaft and, when the shaft suddenly starts rotating, the pinion's inertia causes it to move along the spiral and engage with the starter ring on the flywheel. If it doesn't move freely on the spiral, it can spin up at the same rate as the shaft, and fail to engage. Sounds like that's what is happening.
For the pinion to move on the spiral, there needs to be some light lubrication on it. If the garage cleaned *all* of the oil off it, that might be what's causing the problem.
Reply to
Roger Mills
In article ,
All this design are pre-engage.
Not a Bendix drive. I'd be surprised if that is used anywhere these days. But the original Lucas was pre engage too.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
In article ,
Ah - forgot you'd once heard it.
But that one was replaced under warranty years ago and has been fine up until now. Although some do say they sound odd in operation. I'd say just different.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
In that case, it seems odd that it spins without engaging. My recollection is that this type only turned the motor on after the solenoid had engaged the pinion.
Reply to
Roger Mills
the starter pinion has a one way clutch in it (so that if you hold the starter engaged it does not spin the starter too fast.) If that one way clutch fails or is gummed up, then it is quite possible for the pinion to be thrown in and the motor side to run, but it just doesn't turn the pinion. That could be quite random as to whether it starts the car, and may operate normally after a few tries (and the pinion warms a little) It would also match well with your mention of the oil leak, particularly if they dumped the starter in cleaner. (the guy that used to fix starters/alternators for me would not accept any for repair if they had been washed by the customer !! unfortunately he has now retired)
Reply to
MrCheerful
I don't quite understand what you're saying.
We've now ascertained that it's a pre-engage type starter. This type does indeed have a one way clutch - which allows the pinion to turn faster than its shaft - but not vice versa. This prevents the engine from driving the starter motor at 40,000 RPM or whatever if the pinion remains in engagement after the engine has started. [Not a problem with the earlier Bendix type because the engine in that case would wind the pinion back down its spiral - causing it to disengage].
But that doesn't really explain how a pre-engage starter can spin without rotating the engine. Unless the one-way clutch can fail in a way which allows the shaft to spin *without* the pinion turning?
Reply to
Roger Mills
that is exactly it, just as is often found on modern alternators, one way clutchs do fail, I have seen three in the last two years on alternators. I would guess that when starter one way clutches fail then they get changed with the whole starter on spec. when it won't start, rather than diagnosed and the actual part replaced. This would often be done at the roadside, while the alternator one way takes longer to develop as the vehicle still starts and runs, the only clue is some squealing initially which fades as the load reduces or it warms up and locks as it should.
Reply to
MrCheerful
In article ,
As far as I know, all they did was steam clean the underside of the engine. Before replacing the sump gasket - which was what it was in for. (I'm getting too old to work under a car in the street)
They did mention the starter was soaked in oil, though.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
In article ,
Makes sense. Is it a possible DIY job to replace the one way clutch - assuming it can be bought as a spare?
I'm still just about up to working on things on the bench - unlike under the car. ;-)
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
I doubt that it would be available easily, although the starter should be easy enough to take apart to replace it.
You could always go for a wosp 2kw version, only 300 sobs
formatting link
Reply to
MrCheerful

MotorsForum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.