Transponder ignition key 1999 Mustang

I purchsed a 1999 Mustang but it only had one each ignition key and security fob. What have people been paying at the Ford Dealers to get
a duplicate transponder key and how does it compare to having a lock smith do this job? What should one ask a lock smith as to having the ability to make duplicate transponder keys? Thx
P.S. Since this is my first Mustang, any driving tips, or schools for learning how to handle the vehicle?
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It usually runs one hour of labor and the price of how ever many keys you want. So, 2 keys would be like $65 labor and $60 for the keys. You have to have the dealer ship do it unless you have two keys for a locksmith to work from. If you only have the one key you are up a creak and have to see the dealer. Mike McCune

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I'm in the same boat with my '01 and only one key. Why does a locksmith need 2 keys to make a spare?

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Because unless he/she has the (very expensive) equipment needed to reprogram the computer in the car to accept a new key code (rendering your old key useless anyway), he/she will need two keys to allow the new blank key to be programmed. There's a way that two programmed keys can program another key, much like the key fob idea.
JS

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OK, I assumed that they could 'clone' the existing key transponder code.... so they must be 'rolling' codes like a garage door opener then?

get
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for
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The code of the key isn't changed, each keys code is added to the memory in the dash cluster. If you have two programed keys there is a procedure to add additional keys. If you only have one programed key, for security, you can only have the additional keys added through the software. Anyone buying a used car should demand there are two keys, and two fobs, at the time of the sale.
--
Mike King
Silver 10th Anniversary Cobra Coupe
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I'm confused here. According to the owner's manual, all I need to do is take one of the original keys and turn the ignition on, turn if off, inset the new key and turn it on again, at which point the car will read the new key's code and stick it in its memory (subject to the 16-key limit).
My assumption (and this may be where I go wrong) was that the chips in these keys each have an ID number that was hard-coded at the factory, and the car just reads that. Is there in fact some code that has to be programmed into the key when it's cut before the car can recognize it?
STE
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 23:14:58 -0600, "STE"
one of the original keys and turn the ignition on, turn if off, inset the new key and turn it on again, at which point the car will read the new key's code and stick it in its memory (subject to the 16-key limit).

keys each have an ID number that was hard-coded at the factory, and the car just reads that. Is there in fact some code that has to be programmed into the key when it's cut before the car can recognize it?

your assumption is right. The car has to learn the key. The programming methods are different over the years. Remove NO-SPAM from email address when replying
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I had my 2000 in for window tinting, the guy said he knows of allot of people "drilling" out the key, removing the chip & taping it to the ignition column (inside so nobody knows). I haven't tried this, just thought I'd pass it along.
wrote:

take one of the original keys and turn the ignition on, turn if off, inset the new key and turn it on again, at which point the car will read the new key's code and stick it in its memory (subject to the 16-key limit).

these keys each have an ID number that was hard-coded at the factory, and the car just reads that. Is there in fact some code that has to be programmed into the key when it's cut before the car can recognize it?

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yeah, I think you would be better off buying two extra keys on ebay and program them yourself. They're cheap on ebay.
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bad part is......you can't program the key yourself without having 2 programmed keys in hand. If you only have 1 key, you have to pay the bucks to get a 2nd.
wrote:

is
inset
new
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It depends what year mustang you have. I think I can do it on my 2003 without a single remote. All I need is the key.
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wrote:

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and
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