If you're hungry for power or fuel efficiency, beware of a scam like this one:



If they can't suck in enough oxygen then LPG will make the problem even worse.
--
Clive

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snipped-for-privacy@Extra150miles.com says...

You mean you can convert one form of energy into another. Thats the law.
--
Carl Robson
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snipped-for-privacy@yewbank.demon.co.uk says...

Seriously, look into proper LPG optimisation.
LPG has a lower calorific value so requires more fuel, but has a higher octane so can handle more advance and compression before pre-ignition.
Using sequential injection rather than a simple gas ring in the inlet and the correct ignition and compression (or artificially raised through forced induction) you can at least equal petrol efficiency.
It isn't rocket science, LPG is the ideal for for turbo boosting and because of the better resistance to knock, you don't need to over-richen the mixture to reduce the risk of knock. Petrol and diesel engines very often run massively rich under boost to cool the engine to keep the knock down.
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You've been reading too many comic books, or perhaps you just believe everything you read.
--
Clive

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snipped-for-privacy@yewbank.demon.co.uk says...

Just experience that manufacturers would rather throw your fuel, at providing extra protection, than their money at providing a replacement engine. They cover their own arses by using slight overfueling, using the additional fuel to cool the piston tops and avoid knock. It is a standard practice because production engines are no where near blueprinted and vary enough that you can't fine tune for varying driver use and the life of the vehicle.
My old Celica GT4 (all-trac) used to cover the read valance with black soot (it was petrol) even though the emisions were well within the UK fairly strict MOT standards, it even ran rich after the boost was upped by 5PSI, right to the safe limit of the standard toyota fueling map/headgasket.
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I currently drive a car that's 8+ years old and has 90K+ miles on it - hoping to keep it for 2-3 more years. I feel that car technology could change significantly over the next several years - not sure it's worth buying a new gas or even hybrid vehicle now.
Boris
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boris wrote:

Hybrids usually use NiMH (nickel metal hydride) batteries. Generally, 500 to 1,000 full discharge/charge cycles is about the upper limit for the life of such a battery.
But hybrid cars don't discharge their batteries very deeply at all. So the above figures become somewhat meaningless. In that situation, what's important is the cumulative total energy taken from / returned to the battery. And just age and temperature related degradation.
We'll really have to wait and see as a history develops for this battery chemistry in this application.
John
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Thanks for the info. What about plug-in cars (like Tesla)? Will their batteries die rather fast?
Boris
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boris wrote:

I'd expect so - shorter life that those used in hybrids.
I haven't researched the battery types used in full-electric cars, but I'd expect them to be more exotic chemistries, selected with very strong emphasis on the energy-to-weight ratio.
John
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