Is P2238 & P0031 an easy fix on a 2005 Camry XLE V6?

So my wife's 2005 Camry XLE V6 (67,000 miles) had the check engine light come on and now her "Trac Off" light is on. I had the codes
scanned and it turned up P2238 and P0031. Apparently P2238 is noted in TSB EG037-4 and is a known issue with a faulty Air / Fuel O2 sensor at Bank 1 Sensor 1 location. Has anyone replaced this part? Apparently it's just behind the manifold on the drivers side? P0031 is supposed to be the O2 sensor just in front of cat. converter. Dealership quote me $495 which sounded like a lot just for an couple O2 sensors. Anyone out there have any tips or info?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My check engine code Pwhatever was defined as something wrong with the same sensor--Bank 1 Sensor 1--on my 3 litre 6 cyl. 1999 Camry. No other symptoms--gas mileage seems unaffected, runs smooth, accelerates okay, online info says to watch for a very rich mixture which could result in poor mileage and/or damage to the cat. converter. I'm in NO hurry to spend any money on it as we have NO enviro inspections up here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thee Chicago Wolf (MVP) wrote:

Both those codes are for problems with the SAME Air Fuel sensor. (Bank 1 sensor 1). It's probably a $300 part at the dealer...it's $250 at Napa. Then add $100 minimum labor to install, and don't forget the $100 minimum to use THEIR scan tool (again?) not your previous information.
so, yep, $500
GW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

GW,
Thanks for the info. Should I go OEM or it doesn't matter? I can get the part around $150 online.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thee Chicago Wolf (MVP) wrote:

OE is a Denso brand, so I would use that, which can be found....tricky part is there are several different part # listings so you gotta make really sure its the right one.
GW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I got a good tip on the OE part number and what seems a decent schematic of where the part is located here: http://www.2carpros.com/questions/toyota-camry-2005-toyota-camry-obdc-error-code-p0031
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I got a good tip on the OE part number and what seems a decent schematic of where the part is located here: http://www.2carpros.com/questions/toyota-camry-2005-toyota-camry-obdc-error-code-p0031
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I got a good tip on the OE part number and what seems a decent schematic of where the part is located here: http://www.2carpros.com/questions/toyota-camry-2005-toyota-camry-obdc-error-code-p0031
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Just to cross the eyes and dot the T's,
Bank 1 is the bank with the #1 cylinder, and the #1 cylinder is the one at the forward end of the crankshaft, not the one on the front of the engine. The transmission is on the back of the engine where the #6 cylinder is found, and the #1 cylinder is at the front of the engine where the accessory belts and stuff such as the alternator and air conditioner are found -- in a transverse (sideways) engine, the front of the engine is not the side that is directly behind the bumper, it is at the end adjacent to a shock tower.
I only bring this to your attention because on the link you posted, somebody replaced the wrong sensor and then described in detail how the light remained on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

From some other forums, the others who replaced this sensor said it's right near the exhaust manifold and I do know what that looks like. Right now it's not something that pressing to fix but if I feel daunted I could always look at a Haynes manual or something. Thanks for the info.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


It is not near the exhaust manifold, it is mounted directly to the exhaust manifold. And, if the motor is a V6, there are two exhaust manifolds so you have to know which exhaust manifold you are working on -- which is why I went to the trouble to help you identify which sensor you are interested in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks man.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thee Chicago Wolf (MVP) wrote:

That's a good picture and it identifies Bank 1 Sensor 1, and when you cross reference from "mechanic/engineer terms" to the parts catalog, the B1S1 sensor is referred to "Upstream, Rear" , and from Denso's very own catalog, the current part number is 234-9047 which over-rules any number found in an old bulletin anywhere.
you can check yourself:
http://www.densoautoparts.com/find-my-part/vehicle-selection
GW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just wanted to follow up with everyone who helped me out with this one. Just replaced the sensor a bit ago and it wasn't too bad. I used a medium side adjustable wrench but man was it a pain to get leverage enough to loosen it. I had about 10" inches on either side of the sensor to work with and about 5" of play from 4 o'clock to about 2 o'clock. The dumb heat shield thing that surrounds this part...Jesus, what retard though to not make it removable to be able to easily get at this sensor. If it wasn't for the shield it would take two seconds to remove. In retrospect, a 7/8" deep socket would easily do the trick for anyone wanting to replace it so long as you're 100% sure it's the problem part. Just cut the wires right where they're coming out and you'll get this sucker out in no time. The space is tight so getting leverage is the only tough part. If you have big arms it's gonna be a tough one. All in all it took around 1 & 1/2 hours. It is located just above the catalytic converter under the engine. I know it's not a binaries group but if this pic helps someone else, save yourself the $500 the dealer would charge.
The actual OEM part I replaced was 89467-06020 and I replaced it with the suggested part of 239-9047. Turned the key and MIL light is gone. I paid around $80 for the Denso part on eBay. Thanks everyone for the advice and tips.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, April 6, 2014 5:04:40 PM UTC-5, Thee Chicago Wolf (MVP) wrote: In retrospect, a 7/8" deep socket would easily do the trick

They sell O2 sensor sockets. They look about like a spark plug socket with a slit cut on the side for the wires to pass through. I've got one from having to change one a few years ago. When changing a O2 sensor, you want to warm it up and get it hot first. Usually makes it easier to break loose. And always use anti-seize paste on the new one, but that's pretty much a given because most all are sold with the paste already on it, or include a little tube of it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.