New tires for 08 Sienna?

Coming up on 30,000 miles on 08 Sienna and it's time for new tires. OEMs were Michelin Energy LX4s, which seemed to be pretty good all weather tires,
altho they're wearing out sooner than I would have liked. Any recommendations for decent all weather replacements would be appreciated. Thanks for your replies!
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I've been happy with the Costco version of your tires - Michelin Energy MXV4's. I keep them inflated about 4 ~ 5 PSI above the pressure indicated on the door label. I get a slightly harsher ride and longer tread life and probably get slightly better fuel economy.
--

Ray O
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I used Goodyear Assurance TripleTreds on my last minivan and was happy with them. Goodyear claims they have the best traction, but have a little more noise than some of their other tires.
-- Ron
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Nokian WR. Hands down the best all-season tire, especially if you get any snow or cold in your area.
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I'd not base the life of the next set of Michelins on the last set. Auto makers are able to buy tires with less tread on them to save a few bucks per tire. Over the millions of tires they burn through while building cars, this few bucks adds up to a pile of money.
If you were happy with the performance and the various other benchmarks for measuring quality -- besides life -- then buy another set of Michelins. The tires you buy will undoubtedly last longer than the tires that Toyota installed.
Having said that, visit www.tirerack.com and you can read what others have to say about pretty much any tire that has ever been built.
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The tires installed on new vehicles do not have less tread on them than replacement tires. Typical tread depth on the original tires is somewhere around 11/32."
If a tire had less tread, then the overall diameter would be less, resulting in poorer fuel economy, or the rest of the tire would have to have a larger diameter to get the same overall diameter, which would weigh and cost more.
Original tires tend to have a shorter tread life because the compounds are biased towards better traction without resorting to more expensive compounds that offer the same traction with a longer tread life. The bias towards better traction results in better reviews from automotive columnists, who usually have a bias towards performance rather than long tread life.
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Ray O
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On Tue, 12 Oct 2010 00:07:43 -0500, Ray O wrote:

I know the Toyos on my Corolla 1200's wore out FAST! I also partially attribute that to the smaller Corollas being able to be knocked out alignment easier.
My 1980 Corolla SR5 (Trueno) hatch came with Bridgestone 406s, IIRC. They only went 125,000 miles! What a rip off! ;)
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It says Last...In...Kadora
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Now you got me thinking. I think my 1501 may have been the last Toyota model to take 'bias-ply' tires. It was the bottom of the line 79 Corolla. Remember they were advertising it for $3748? My folks spend an extra $100 or so and got me an AM radio. I seem to remember replacing the 155 S 13's early on. The only cars that might have taken bias plies after that would have been the Starlet in the US.
OTOH, Dad didn't like radial tires. He worked at Monkey Wards and they got a lot of their radials back having shed the tread. It took us a while to work out a bias replacement for what the TE31 (1977) came with. Turns out the nearest size was B78-13, but they looked like swamp buggy tires on the Corolla. Surprised we didn’t have to talk him out of a pair of Firestone Deluxe Champions in the 6.50 x 13 size. They wore out a bit fast because the specs for alignment were for radial tires, and bias ply tires needed a slightly different alignment.
Some years later I managed to talk him into radials on the Corolla again. The size, if I remember, was 165 SR 13.
(Can you even buy 155 S 13's in anything more expensive than the cheap Poop Boy specials these days? I can't hardly find 175/65R14's for my AE101. 185's all over the place for the AE102's.)
Charles Grozny
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