Timing Belt Replacement

I own a 1999 Camry XL (4 cyl) which has 68,000 miles. My mechanic thinks it's time for a new timing belt. But that might be like asking the barber
whether you need a haircut. I recall the old rule decades back was every 60,000 miles. Does mine sound like I should do it now?
--

PT



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PT wrote:

What does your owner's manual and maintenance manuals say?
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The Toyota dealer where I am in Canada says 140 000 km, but there is also an age effect at work here. I'd say leave it another year and then change it. It's not an interference engine, so it's not big bucks if it breaks, but there is a safety issue of suddenly losing all power.
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According to Toyota's web site, the replacement interval is 90,000 miles or 72 months for your car. According to Gate's web site, the engine is non-interference so the engine should not be damaged if the timing belt breaks, although you will be left stranded when that happens.
Rubber does deteriorate over time, which is why automakers put a time and mileage replacement recommendation. That said, at the rate you are putting miles on the car, you should be able to delay timing belt replacement for at least another year.
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Ray O
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Its about 20 years old, rubber rots, maybe you dont mind getting stranded on a rainy night in the worst part of town, but you might cause an accident, that is negligence.
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On Thu, 5 Jun 2008 20:20:29 -0700 (PDT), ransley

1999-2008 = 9 yo.
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Since it is a 1999, it's about 9 years old.
Owners manual on my 1998 definitely says 90,000 miles. An unusually high number of people report problems after timing belt changes (compared to other maintenance items).
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ok, 9 years isnt as bad,
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Why is that do you think?
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

They are often not replaced correctly.
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SMS wrote:

How much should it cost?
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I would recommend it be done by a dealer or very experienced independent shop (specializing in Toyota service). Call around to all the dealers in your area to find the price. Sometimes they have service specials on their web page, or just ask the Service Advisor.
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Mark A wrote:

I have a 98 Camry and it's at 86K miles now. I haven't decided if I'm going to change it or have it done. I want it done right and if you want anything done right........
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....you take it to a competent mechanic, but you tell newgroup denizens that you did it yourself. :)
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Timing belt change is really not a complicated procedure. Anybody who claims to be a professional mechanic should be able to do the job competently especially if they have access to the service data and they all do.
If you do it yourself, most likely you will find service data at your local library.
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dbu wrote:

I've changed more than a few, want hear some stories about jobs that have been done by others that had to be done over? A crankshaft bolt that came loose, a motor mount bolt that was stripped, missing bolts and nuts, parts that got replaced that didn't need replacing, and parts that should have been replaced that didn't get replaced? Book allows 2 1/2 hours shouldn't take me more than 2 1/2 days. And one that comes to mind, that was my doing, I changed the timing belt on one of my Toyotas and didn't change the water pump at the time, 30K later I was back in there, replacing the water pump. Right now the crisis of the moment is a flat on the lawnmower, first things first.
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What really gets my goat is the shops that that tell you to change the WP and tensioner at the same time you change the timer belt then charge you the same labor that they charge if they were ONLY doing the WP OR the tensioner. That of course drives up the price of timing belt change. Don't do it. Tell the suckers to change the TB and if the WP is not leaking or the tensioner is free and not making noise to forget it. When they do make noise or leak then go back and have it done. The only reason to change out a good WP or tensioner is for the shop to suck up more money out of the unaware customer. Honest shops Will tell you the same as I'm telling you.
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Dunno.. I'd always want to change the WP and tensioner if I'm in there doing the belt. Delaying the pump in particular is just not worth the risk of damage to the engine, and also you'd have to go back in there. I always recommend doing it all and being done with it. Oil seals too.. But.. I do it myself... Changing a timing belt is easy. But... You have to be very exact in setting it back up. You can't even be one tooth off. This is not hard to do, but it's not unusual to have to redo it 2-3 times before finally locking it all down. I'll align the marks before removing the belt making sure they are perfectly aligned. When I put the new belt on, I make triple sure the marks are *exactly* like they were with the old belt. Never have had any problem.. I'd crank the engine with the new belt, and it would sound the same as with the old one.. You will know if it's even one tooth off. It won't run and time right. It'll feel and sound different right off the bat. If that ever happened to me, I'd tear it back apart and do it over until it was right. But.. I make sure it is right the first time.. I *hate* doing things over. The danger in postponing a WP is they often totally flake out in only a few minutes time. You often get no or little warning before they start squealing, and pouring out water. I don't need that @#$% in my life.. So I alway swap in a new pump if I'm in timing belt territory. And.. I always use at least a new pump if not OEM. Don't get the rebuilts. They suck. But the new ones are ok. Or at least I haven't had any problems with new ones so far. Costs a bit more, but it's worth it. If there is a kiss of death to a JA engine, it's overheating. I'll do anything I can to reduce the likelihood of it happening. Once you overheat one real bad, they ain't never the same again.. :(
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On Thu, 5 Jun 2008 20:20:29 -0700 (PDT), ransley

Oh come on...MIGHT cause an accident? Using that logic, he should never drive again because he MIGHT cause an accident.
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wrote:

you might well cause an accident when you lose power brakes and power steering. Ever try to turn a steering wheel on a stalled engine while the car is rolling?
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