speed sensitive steering

'97 Sierra Z71 Is there anyway to disable 'speed sensitive steering', and leave just plain old power steering? Thanks.

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You will likely not like the results of this. If you set the system to run at the higher pump pressure that you get at low speeds, you get no steering feedback at highway speeds. If you set the pump to the low pressure output, you will run out of pump pressure when trying to turn the wheels at low speeds like during parallel parking.

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Roller wrote:

</pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">'97 Sierra Z71 Is there anyway to disable 'speed sensitive steering', and leave just plain old power steering? Thanks. </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!---->
</pre> </blockquote> I'd rather have low pressure all the time. As is, the steering is way too sensitive at low speed; light continuous steering pressure, as in a constant, low speed turn, produces sudden, unintended, slight oversteer.<br> There is nothing wrong with the linkage, wheels, tires, etc. -- so I suspect it's the variable power steering.<br> </body> </html>
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This is a common problem. You need to replace the variable speed sensor located on the steering shaft just above the brake pedal. Easy DIY project.
</PRE> <BLOCKQUOTE type="cite"><PRE wrap="">'97 Sierra Z71 Is there anyway to disable 'speed sensitive steering', and leave just plain old power steering? Thanks. </PRE></BLOCKQUOTE><PRE wrap=""><!---->
</PRE></BLOCKQUOTE>I'd rather have low pressure all the time. As is, the steering is way too sensitive at low speed; light continuous steering pressure, as in a constant, low speed turn, produces sudden, unintended, slight oversteer.<BR>There is nothing wrong with the linkage, wheels, tires, etc. -- so I suspect it's the variable power steering.<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
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calhoun wrote:

</pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">'97 Sierra Z71 Is there anyway to disable 'speed sensitive steering', and leave just plain old power steering? Thanks. </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!---->
</pre> </blockquote> I'd rather have low pressure all the time. As is, the steering is way too sensitive at low speed; light continuous steering pressure, as in a constant, low speed turn, produces sudden, unintended, slight oversteer.<br> There is nothing wrong with the linkage, wheels, tires, etc. -- so I suspect it's the variable power steering.<br> </blockquote> </blockquote> It's inside then? I thought it was at the bottom of the steering column. Inside is much better. Thanks.<br> </body> </html>
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Yes it is inside. Called an EVO sensor. need to unbolt upper steering shaft from the lower. Pull off wire connectors and slide old sensor off and slide new one on and plug back in the wire. Hardest part is cutting though all the foam on the wiring harness.
</PRE> <BLOCKQUOTE type="cite"><PRE wrap="">'97 Sierra Z71 Is there anyway to disable 'speed sensitive steering', and leave just plain old power steering? Thanks. </PRE></BLOCKQUOTE><PRE wrap=""><!---->
</PRE></BLOCKQUOTE>I'd rather have low pressure all the time. As is, the steering is way too sensitive at low speed; light continuous steering pressure, as in a constant, low speed turn, produces sudden, unintended, slight oversteer.<BR>There is nothing wrong with the linkage, wheels, tires, etc. -- so I suspect it's the variable power steering.<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></BLOCKQUOTE>It's inside then? I thought it was at the bottom of the steering column. Inside is much better. Thanks.<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------070201060304030507010502 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
calhoun wrote:

</pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">'97 Sierra Z71 Is there anyway to disable 'speed sensitive steering', and leave just plain old power steering? Thanks. </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!---->
</pre> </blockquote> I'd rather have low pressure all the time. As is, the steering is way too sensitive at low speed; light continuous steering pressure, as in a constant, low speed turn, produces sudden, unintended, slight oversteer.<br> There is nothing wrong with the linkage, wheels, tires, etc. -- so I suspect it's the variable power steering.<br> </blockquote> </blockquote> It's inside then? I thought it was at the bottom of the steering column. Inside is much better. Thanks.<br> </blockquote> </blockquote> Do you know what happens if I just unplug it? Constant high pressure? Constant low pressure? No power at all? Random? Engine won't start?<br> </body> </html>
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I just changed it out never tried starting/driving without it. Why don't you give it a try and post back with what happens? Like I said, that was the hardest part of the job, getting all the foam tape off the original connection.
</PRE> <BLOCKQUOTE type="cite"><PRE wrap="">'97 Sierra Z71 Is there anyway to disable 'speed sensitive steering', and leave just plain old power steering? Thanks. </PRE></BLOCKQUOTE><PRE wrap=""><!---->
</PRE></BLOCKQUOTE>I'd rather have low pressure all the time. As is, the steering is way too sensitive at low speed; light continuous steering pressure, as in a constant, low speed turn, produces sudden, unintended, slight oversteer.<BR>There is nothing wrong with the linkage, wheels, tires, etc. -- so I suspect it's the variable power steering.<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></BLOCKQUOTE>It's inside then? I thought it was at the bottom of the steering column. Inside is much better. Thanks.<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></BLOCKQUOTE>Do you know what happens if I just unplug it? Constant high pressure? Constant low pressure? No power at all? Random? Engine won't start?<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
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How does speed sensitive steering work? Just curious. Thanks.
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It is relatively simple. There is a electrically controlled pressure regulator that controls the hydraulic pressure at coming out of the power steering pump. As the vehicle speed is increased, the pressure drops. In addition, there is a sensor on the steering shaft that increases pump pressure if the steering sensor indicates rapid steering input (like during emergency maneuvering). This is the sensor that often fails and causes erratic behavior of the pressure regulator. It is simple to replace and is located just inside the cab next to the fire wall on the steering shaft.

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I'm sure there are other varieties out there, so this may not be the only description. Typical hydraulic power steering is a constantly flowing system (the pump is always turning and moving fluid), therefore when the steering is not requiring power the fluid has to have a way back to the pump. You could call it a by-pass or return line. The more fluid permitted to bypass the power steering and go back to the pump the harder the steering is to turn. The type of speed sensitive steering I've seen simply involves a valve on the bypass line that opens and closes with the speed of the vehicle - the slower the vehicle the more closed the valve on the bypass line (sending more fluid to the steering box), and vice versa. This gives the feel of easier steering at slower speeds (like parking lot maneuvers), and stiffer steering at higher speeds. Add in a sensor at the base of the steering shaft to detect panic steering movements (which will close down the valve making it easier to steer) and that's about the whole package.
The original version of this was simply added-on, but now is more integrated into the steering gear and components.
Cheers - Jonathan

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Thanks for the input. Was curious...

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