Heating Xantia HDI (was Re: [OT] Posts in non-English languages (was Re: c3))

Message i.d.: inspired me,


I can only go back in time when I had my BX diesel. That one had the same problem and shielding the radiator was the solution in those days. Not only good for the room temperature but also for the engine. It needs a high temperature to get the oil in optimal condition. Times have changed but I guess that shielding still is the most easiest solution.
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Johan; Certifiable me. Reply to Hotm ail



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wrote:

Don't know about the Xantia, but in the Berlingo HDi 90hp, I do the following: 1. Set the airflow to internal circulation (don't take air from outside). 2. Set the ventilator to more than 2/3 (makes a lot of noise) 3. Set the heating to full (of course) 4. Set the air direction to defrost (windscreen symbol)
The sense behind this is that the Berlingo has an electric heater that gets activated if you set the heating to full, ventilation to more than 2/3 and (maybe that's not necessary) the defrost position. (That seems to be Cit's kind of voodoo magic ;-)). The electric heater will heat the cooling liquid. The circulating air is not so cold as the air outside. With these settings, I get nice warm airflow after about three kilometers in the city.
After the motor has warmed up (which takes a lot longer...), there's no need for the electric heater, and you might as well regulate the settings as you like. Don't forget to change the setting back to external air after a while so that you'll egt enough oxygen ;-)
Well, even if the Xantia doesn't have the electric heater, selecting internal circulation for a while should help you getting warm more quickly...
Hartmut
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Indeed the Xantia doesn't have an electric heater. So when I do it in the way you suggested I think the oil will stay at a low temperature for a long time. Is it possible to build in an electric heater aftherwile? Now the temperature outside is about 5 celsius and I have to drive more than 10 kilometers before the oiltemperature raises till 80. Maybe I have to buy a waterheater like they use in Sweden?
D.J.
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.. I don't know, that will only be true, if the heating circuit is actually closed off when you turn off the heating. Many modern cars just don't let the warmed air reach you, thus saving the costs for a 'real' heating valve. If this is the case with the Xantia, the motor temperature won't be affected by the way you use the heating. But someone with more insight into the heating circuits should step in here...
With my former car, I had to leave the valve (a real one) closed until the motor started to warm up. But that's a different story.

These are heating resistors in the cooling liquid hoses. I don't think it's easily possible to add them...

..do you have an oil thermometer? I don't, but with the Berlingo, it takes up to 15 km (at about zero įC) till the thermostat opens to the actual cooler circuit (visible by a noticeable drop, then slow rise in the water temperature display).

If you're usually parking near a power plug at night, that could be quite a good investment. Look at http://www.defa.com/heating.php3 , for example...
Hartmut
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