Re: surface rust question



Well, it shouldn't if you get rid of ALL the rust, but if not it sure will. The thing is, many times it's hard to get rid of all of it, even if it looks like you did.
If I'm not concerned at the moment with looks, but want to get rid of

I would probably use some of that rust remover that converts rust to a paintable surface. Then sand it all down and use an etching primer, and then a coat of paint. At least you will be slowing it down a great deal. You sure don't want to leave it out like it is. The more rust, the more pits in the metal to have to derust and fill. Rust is a real PIA. I have to fight it constantly on my 68 ford. If you let it get too far, it's a real pain to fix.

Dunno...Shoudn't cost that much. MK
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"The Nolalu Barn Owl" wrote

I know you're right. I was trying to accurately describe the level it has attained. If you were to look at it, and didn't know any better, you would think it was only just beginning.
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"Guitar Boogie" wrote

I have an electric orbital sander. Because of where I live I don't have access to a compressor or an ideal place to set one up. I would have to get a cheap paint gun. I doubt the one I have for the house would work.

There is some areas of rust in the "rain gutters" around the cab. My thought was to use a round wire brush on a drill to get in these close areas. Is there any reason why I shouldn't do this?

If I were to brush on the Ospho, could I lightly sand it before painting to remove the streaks like you mention below with the primer?

After painting, would there be any need to wax it?

With the holes, I'm leaning toward replacing them completely. Maybe having a body shop do it, but I know that can get expensive.

Thanks.
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.. Re: surface rust question Group: alt.autos.classic-trucks Date: Mon, Jun 23, 2003, 5:40pm (CDT+5) From: snipped-for-privacy@no.com (TheDave)
"Guitar Boogie" wrote If you want to do it one panel at a time .. and don't care what it looks like during the project.... stop the rust process as much as possible. You WILL need a power sander of some kind....preferably air operated (pneumatic) and preferably orbital, and a paint gun. A cheap paint gun from Wallmart will work for this..... check out the pawn shops.....
==Dave== I have an electric orbital sander. Because of where I live I don't have access to a compressor or an ideal place to set one up. I would have to get a cheap paint gun. I doubt the one I have for the house would work. ....
==gibson== Do the areas one at a time like you said. Sand the area to metal with 36 grit sand paper.....don't attempt to get all the rust if it's pitted into the surface...abusive use of the sander will heat the metal to the point of causing the metal to expand and you'll have a wavy looking finish when you get around to final finishing the project.
==Dave== There is some areas of rust in the "rain gutters" around the cab. My thought was to use a round wire brush on a drill to get in these close areas. Is there any reason why I shouldn't do this?
==gibson== No reason what so ever. I would even suggest using a grinder instead on those areas. Eat out as much of the rust as possible. .......
==gibson== Once the panel is to bare metal.... wipe it clean....then "wash it" with a rag "soaked" in automotive grade lacquer thinner. Don't use hardware store lacquer thinner...trust me on that one. Get all the dust off the panel... then coat it with Ospho. Ospho is a rust agent...you can paint over it. You can use a cheap wallmart paint gun...preferably.....or brush it on. If you brush it on or wipe it on with a soaked rag...you'll have the streaks in the final product.
==Dave== If I were to brush on the Ospho, could I lightly sand it before painting to remove the streaks like you mention below with the primer? ==gibson== Yes. But it's not going to be necessary if you put the ospho on one panel at a time and let it dry overnight. The primer should be applied heavy. Ospho is as thin as water, any uneveness will be easily removed when sanding the primer. If your intentions are to get this thing ready for a "final" paint job, your going to need to prime it at least twice. Let the primer dry between sandings and coats. The info I gave you was with the intention that you didn't care what it looked like for now. That you just wanted to stop the rust. More steps will be needed if you intend to get this to be the last paint job on it. .......
==gibson== Let the Ospho dry overnight. Then wipe the area down with a dry rag to get da bugs and dirt off, and use "red oxide" primer to cover the Oshpo. Let the primer dry...won't take long.. less than 30 minutes on a hot day... and even quicker if you didn't wet it excessively. When the primer is dry....sand it with 180 grit sand paper..and spray any kind of automotive grade urethane paint over the top of it. It's gonna look nasty.... but it's not going to rust anymore...and you just layed down one awesome base to work with when you get around to painting it. You will be able to "sand and go" with the base you just layed down.
==Dave== After painting, would there be any need to wax it? ==gibson== Again, this was intended as stop-gap measure to end the rust ordeal. If you want a fine finish, there will be more steps needed. If you are going to paint over what we just put on it...DON"T WAX IT. ...
==gibson== You could go over the Ospho with an expoxy primer....but I have never cared for riding around with primer and letting the elements affect it ...and then attempting to get paint to stick to it later. There are many different brands of the rust agent other than Ospho....I use Ospho because I know it works. You can substitute what you feel confortable with. TIPS.......... If it's rusted on the outside......... it's likely rusted on the inside.... Rust can move mountains and lift tall buildings.....it exerts a powerfull force that will pucker paint in a skinny minute. If it's rusted on the inside...... covering the outside is a waste of time and money without covering the inside. Eventually it will rust again... blister the paint and ..poof...there goes all your hard work. When working with rust "holes"...this is especially true. So treat the inner panel first....then the outer panel.. use the hole if needed to gain access to the inner panel. ALWAYS...go well beyond the hole when repairing rust.... use fiberglass as the initial repair... it's hard as a rock..and when the enevitable rust comes back....the fiberglass is going to hold it back that much longer...and two coats is better than one.
==Dave== With the holes, I'm leaning toward replacing them completely. Maybe having a body shop do it, but I know that can get expensive. Thanks.
.. your welcome.... give me an email if you need anymore help. .gibson6string.. =================================
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"Guitar Boogie" wrote

You are correct. My intention is to stop the rust, and looks are not critical at the moment. A real paint job will be somewhere in the future, but that may be several years away. Thanks for the info.
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