Biodiesel?

Hey all. I was just wondering about switching to biodiesel, because i can't afford to pay $3.00 a gallon for diesel. I found an 1982 VW diesel pickup that get 45-50 MPG. Do you have to get a kit to run the
biodiesel or just put it in like regular diesel fuel? Saw on Mythbusters that they went and got used vegge oil and ran it in a filter and just put it in an diesel car and it ran with no problem. Also has anyone else ran biodiesel in a cummins?
Thanks for all the comments, Scott
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Biodeiesel can be run without mods to the engine. However, the usual cautions apply... must be filtered to remove all particulates etc. There are many good sites online to read for info.
Cummins official statement says that they don't recommend biodiesel, simply because no standard of quality exists. By this they mean that no set scale of quality has been put forth for the bio fuel, so they cannot say with any assurance what biodiesel will do when burned in their engines. They do say that biodiesel can be run in a Cummins, but that one should be cautious of power upgrades while running bio because regular diesel may have more power. Thus an uprate for bio burning may produce unwanted effects when switching back to mineral diesel fuel.
However, in reading Cummins Engine's site on this topic, you will find that they do not give approval for biodiesel.
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I have in the past and do still run b20 in both of mine. only thing I have noticed is a reduction in smoke. no real impact on fuel mileage (at least not to speak of) or power.
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wrote:

I do not see biodiesel as a long term solution. It has emission issues particularly with NOx which is a good bit higher with higher concentrations of bio fuel and even the chemists are not quite sure why but it is a problem and given that starting in 2008 that diesel are going to have a lot stricter NOx limits than they have escaped in the past this sheds even more of a shadow on biodiesels future. SOme will say I am being biased but diesels are very big NOx generators and have been for years (far worse than gas vehicles which have long been strictly regulated on NOx) and the more you boost them and the worst they get. Non turbo diesels are the least offensive NOx wise. Starting in 08 and later years you are going to see a lot of changes with them and some of them may not be favorable performance wise either as they try to bring them into compliance. With a modern hitech diesel I would stick with good quality straight diesel and limit the usage on bio diesel to older ones (10 years or more older) with theor simpler injection systems that are generally more reliable too. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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Of course you don't, you are spouting off as usual.

Yeah, except.... (pdf file warning for the dial-up guys)
http://www.biodiesel.org/pdf_files/fuelfactsheets/emissions.pdf#search ='Biodiesel%20fuel%20emissions'
If you read this, you notice some things..... such as....
"Criteria pollutants are reduced with biodiesel use. Tests show the use of biodiesel in diesel engines results in substantial reductions of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter. Emissions of nitrogen oxides stay the same or are slightly increased."
Notice that they directly contradict your staterment.
And...
"Nitrogen Oxides -- NOx emissions from biodiesel increase or decrease depending on the engine family and testing procedures. NOx emissions (a contributing factor in the localized formation of smog and ozone) from pure (100%) biodiesel increase on average by 10 percent. However, biodiesel's lack of sulfur allows the use of NOx control technologies that cannot be used with conventional diesel. Additionally, some companies have successfully developed additives to reduce Nox emissions in biodiesel blends."
Notice that in the event of higher NO2 emissions, the lack of sulphur content allows the use of technologies that were otherwise nullified by the presence of the sulphur in mineral diesel.

Apparently the chemists DO know why it is, and have SOLVED the problem.

More bullshit from the unenlightened. Try reading.
SOme

Try 07, or haven't you been reading?

Sure you would, but you would also drive a 1975 dumptruck with a chevy small block 400 and 6.55 gears if you had a choice.
http://www.biodiesel.org/resources/faqs /
http://journeytoforever.org/biodiesel.html
http://transit.metrokc.gov/am/vehicles/biodiesel-pilot.html
http://www.epa.gov/otaq/models/biodsl.htm
http://www.worldenergy.net/product/emissions.asp
There is some reading for you SnoHead...... try and figure it out.
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wrote:

The only one here with that problem is you. Always trying to start something. You must be REALY insecure or something. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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I'm not trying to start a damn thing. I'm trying to keep you from misinforming someone without their knowledge. You had so little to say in defense of your bullshit that it shows who is insecure... you replied without anything to say.
Next time, shut the hell up.
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Does that mean that biodiesel with work in Scotts 82 VW pickup without any modifications or not?
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I'll re-iterate, since the point seems to have been lost....
Each diesel should be able to burn biodiesel. However, it will depend on the individual batch of bioD how well each individual engine burns it.
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On Mon, 31 Jul 2006 02:46:04 +0000, SnoMan wrote:

Actually, depending on who's "facts" you cite, NoX bio-emissions are not that much higher than diesel.
I don't understand why the industry and government are not working on clean-diesel scrubber technology to zap emissions. If we spent 1% of our military budget on this issue - it would be a non-issue in less than a year.
Diesels are the most efficient engine around - ALL of our engines should be running this fuel.
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Scott wrote:

Scott, I think you are confusing burning straight vegetable oil (SVO) and biodiesel. In order to burn straight vegetable oil you need to install a kit. The kit basically involves installing a second heated fuel tank. You also have to insulate or heat the fuel lines running from the veg oil tank to the fuel filter. You start and warm up the engine on diesel fuel. When the engine is warm and the oil tank is heated enough you switch to burning vegetable oil. About 5 minutes before shutting the engine off you switch back to burning diesel fuel to flush out the fuel lines and filter. Biodiesel is a fuel much like diesel fuel. It's made from vegetable oil or animal fats. To burn biodiesel you don't have to alter most diesel vehicles. On some older vehicles like the VW you are considering you might need to change some of the fuel lines. Biodiesel will eat away natural rubber fuel lines. I just started making my own biodiesel so I'm not an expert on the subject but I have done some research. There is an excellent forum that discusses both biodiesel and SVO systems at http://biodiesel.infopop.cc/ . I highly recommend reading up on both sections of the forum before you decide which one is right for you. -- Ken
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Nosey wrote:

Thanks for the infomation. Thats what i needed to know. I read some sites said running straight vegge oil will work on a diesel, but it did not specify of any mods. to the engine.
Thanks, Scott
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Visit TDIClub.com. There are a number of individuals there making there own biodiesel, using waste oil or just regular biodiesel. My 2002 Jetta likes the biodiesel but does seem to take a small hit in mpg.
By the way, you might want a newer VW diesel - there are also some listed on the above website.
JEB

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