Case of Oil

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Quick question: What do you guys pay for a case (12 quarts) of standard motor oil (e.g. 10W-30)? Went to buy a case tonight. Stopped at AutoZone. They wanted $38. Either
prices have gone way up, or I haven't paid attention the last few times I bought oil. O.
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Oregon wrote:

About $12, for Castrol.

Pay attention to the Sunday ads, and you won't get screwed so badly.
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In response to Oregon 's post. I thought everyone should know:

i buy the gallon jugs of 15w40
--
Chris

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Chris Thompson wrote:

One of my disposable lighters ran out of butane, but the flint's still good. The other one is still about 1/3 full of fuel, but no more sparks. So I use one to light the other.
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In response to Beryl 's post. I thought everyone should know:

uh hu good for you,
--
Chris

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I pay a little less that $50 for an oil change of 100% synthetic, 10W-30, 6 qts. and 25k mile filter. I change oil and filter about once every 12-18 months. It costs way more than that to change oil and filter with regular stuff every 3500 miles - not to mention all the hassle involved of just getting it done. Plus I was also able to pick up 1 mpg using synthetic as opposed to regular oil.
http://www.amsoil.com

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A discussion of various oil brands, their prices, characteristics, and other opinions about them always reminds of what happens when two guys sit down at the bar drinking beer and begin discussing the merits of various beers.
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very true. I am trying this one out for size. This is the first time for me an synthetics but I also went with someone else's experience with this product. A couple of long time friends have been using this stuff for some time and swear by it. I figure the hassle alone of changing the oil and filter is worth the extra money up front. It generally costs me around $20 for each change and at 3500 miles each that comes to about 7 oil/filter changes at $20 ea equals $140 plus the hassles. $50 for one oil change during the same amount of time with the hassle of just one just simple sense. It may not work but I'm going to try it. At even 2 of the synthetic oil changes during the same miles is worth it.

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wrote:

SYN oil has merit and I have been using WalMart branded SYN in a "test" vehicle for last 6 years and Mobile one in another for 17 years now and it has been okay but I still change oil every 5K tops because SYN oil may be more stable but is does still get dirty and losses it abilty to clean engine and suspend contaminats too with time and only changing fixes that because filters do not remove it. I also run a few vehicle with regualr dino oil and 3k changes or less and I have seen nothing so far to suggest the SYN oil is a must have for long life. Regular oil changes are a must have though. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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I use it in the Ram & Dakota and it seems to help both fuel mileage and heat a little bit..
We change oil about every 15k and change the Mobile One filter every 7 or 8k..
Where we really noticed a difference, especially in towing the rv, was in changing to synthetic in the differential..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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"this one" meaning Amsoil?
Be advised; only one of their products carries any sort of approval, that being the XL series which carries API approval.
API is the rock bottom. Amsoil carries no ILLSAC, ACEA or OEM approvals.
Use at your own peril.
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wrote:

Now you will have the cult screaming.
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Roy, You are mistaken the API is not rock bottom. For clarity the API (American Petroleum Institute) tests are rather comprehensive and these tests are performed on a special test engine where the lubricity of the oil is tested across its utility temperature range and the additive package is also tested for other attributes like particulate suspension and other factors. The API rating is based on the best test passed by the oil. The first letter represents the oil's intended usage "C" for compression ignition engines (Diesel) and "S" for Spark ignition (Gasoline). The second letter indicates the severity of the test passed like SH or CF. On the other hand, the SAE test is a viscosity test only against a mean standard, similar to the Saybolt scale used by machine tool manufacturers. This is where a fixed volume of oil is poured through an orifice of a particular size and is measured in time, like 30W. The multi-grade rating indicates the pour time at 0 degrees and at 212 degrees, like 10W30, which states that the orifice time at 0 degrees is equivalent to 10W and 212 equivalent to 30W.
In point of fact Amsoil no longer has their oil tested, as it surpasses the most severe API tests by very wide margins. Amsoil is a double diester based oil and is fully synthetic using no petroleum. The lubricity of petroleum based oils starts deteriorating around 220 degrees F and Amsoil starts to fall off around 350 degrees F. Mobil 1 and the like are synthesized, petroleum based oils and although superior to pure petroleum oils, they are inferior to Amsoil in both temperature and lubricity. The real question you need to ask; Is this extra performance worth the higher cost? This is especially true when contamination is an issue, as in a diesel application, where oil changes are the only solution and extended usage is not available to offset the higher cost. Amsoil has its own limitation though. Amsoil's typical failure mode is that it tends to gel into little balls that can block oil passages and filters and I am not sure what causes this and it can happen with new oil as well as old. Steve
wrote:

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WTF are you talking about?? Try following the thread
<big snip>
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In response to Steve Lusardi 's post. I thought everyone should know:

one Roy wasn't the one who made the comment
<big snip>

and i am supposed to believe this rubbish because you and Amsoil says so??? NOPE!! not gonna happen! If the stuff was that good, they would have no problems letting a independent lab test their stuff. the fact that they don't speaks volumes about their product.
<another big snip>
--
Chris

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I'm not Roy. Roy is not me. (no offense Roy)

Actually, it is. The very highest API approvals don't come anywhere close to the minimum (now obsolete) ACEA approvals.

API is a bunch of motor oil marketers getting together and deciding on a standard that their oils will meet at the highest profit margin using the cheapest base stocks.
Rather than rely on the guy selling me oil to tell me what I should use, it makes much more sense to rely on the manufacturer of the vehicle to specify which oils meet their approvals. (survived their testing) Anything else is like a third grader dictating what is a passing grade in his/her respective school.

Yeah, and -they- invent the test which makes it not so "best."

Actually, "S" = service and "C" = commercial

Severity?
You jump from tests and approvals to SAE viscosities... Why I don't know.

Uh-Oh! So, no; Sequence IIIE, Sequence IIIF, Sequence IIIG, Sequence IVA, Sequence VD, Sequence VE, Sequence VG, ASTM D5533, ASTM D6593, ASTM 6891, ASTM 4683, CEC L-38A-94, etc, etc, etc.... ????
One would buy this stuff because?

And the proof is where? And like I said, the most severe API tests don't even come close to the minimum ACEA tests.

"Fully synthetic" is no guarantee of anything.

Really? Checking the High Temperature/High Shear (HTHS)* viscosities of Amsoil against Mobil 1 shows not much difference for the products that would typically be used for normal day to day service. (i.e., excluding the racing oil) I bet if I worked at it a little, I could find some Castrol or Pentosin or ELF oil(s) that would put Amsoil to shame.

Which extra performance would that be? 0.06 CentiPoise @150*C? You better believe it isn't worth the higher cost _OR_ the brain washing.

Sounds like another good reason to avoid it.
* HTHS = viscosity in CentiPoise @ 100*C, 300* F
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On Mon, 1 Oct 2007 23:46:21 +0200, "Steve Lusardi"

This one's a keeper.
Boy, I sure get a warm fuzzy feeling about using Amsoil when I know it's not tested. Yep, a cult zombie message board spammer telling me it surpasses all the tests is good enough for me.
Screw the testing, it only costs money that could be going into the pockets of the MLM pyramid dwellers. I prefer my oil completely untested and completely unsullied by any certifications (which, we all know, place an absolute upper limit on the performance).
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as I stated earlier, I am testing it and a couple friends swear by it. They have been using it for years in the same vehicles and buy ahead on the product. So it's not like they bought it, spent big money, and are embarrassed to say they made the mistake. They are still buying and using it. I've only noticed about 1 mpg increase. I'm looking at the hassles involved with changing it. I refuse to let anyone touch the general maintenance on any of my vehicles. I do all that myself because I need to have it done right the first time. Cross threaded oil pan plugs, over filled rear ends, transmissions, etc. You only experience that crap once before you modify how it's done. And to get approved by any approval agency sometimes takes a lot of money and a lot of offerings of free products (bribery or greasing the skids, so to speak). You can get anything approved if you know how and have the cash - from simple traffic tickets to The Bridge To Nowhere.
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I have used Amsoil years ago on a hot rod Kawasaki and it worked very well, but if you are running a Cummins, Amsoil is NOT the plan. Frequent oil changes are required to purge the oil of diesel ash which deposits on the cylinder walls and then scraped into the lube oil. There is no question that the lubricity of the Amsoil will last a year, but it won't keep the bottom end clean, where 3500 mile oil changes will. Your call. Steve

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Down at the terminal, we been using Shell Advance VSX 4, semi-synthetic, specification: APISG in about half the trucks. It's the best of both worlds.
Google on Shell Advance VSX 4 for more info.
IMHO, I'd do a heck of a lotta research before chosing a lubricant.
Hold The Road,
Z-40
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