Information Gleaned from Domestic Content Labels

Page 4 of 4  


<...>
I was wondering where the list is. Could you post the URL?
So does this squash the conjecture that the first digit of the VIN has something to do with US content?
Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am sure it doesn't in Mike' mind. And to be honest, domestic content is not address in this list. Interestingly, there are a lot of non-Ford users for "1F." It also seems that a "9" in the third position indicates that a vehicle is a "trailer" and that the additional digits are used to indicate the actual trailer manufacturer. If you want to look up a WMI you can either download the Microsoft Access Database (which is what I did) or input a WMI and/or manufacturer into a search engine. Go to: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/manufacture/ Uncheck all the search option except WMI and search away (or go to the ftp site and download the whole thing at once). It accepts partials (like 1T). You can also search by Manufacturers name (partials accepted) or by a combination of WMI and Manufacturer. There is not a single WMI for Toyota that starts with a "1" (NUMMI does, but that is not technically Toyota). Even if Toyota didn't already produce a vehicle that qualifies as a domestic vehicle (but we know they do), don't you suppose if a "1" in the first position was required to indicate a domestic vehicle, they would have reserved such a WMI?
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The reason is, it is not a non union Toyota plant. The vehicles built in the GM/Toyota plant have a '1' because that is the only plant that has a UAW contract that requires 70% US content in the vehicles.
mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can you support this claim, too? I mean that there is a contract that requires 70% US content in the vehicles produced at NUMMI?
This ought to be good.
Jefff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Based on your logic, why do you think this plants Toyotas are different than all of its other plants that are 4 and 5? Search the UAW site, for the information you seek, WBMA.
mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Again, the old man makes a claim he can't support.
Fact is, the VIN has nothing to do with content.
If I am wrong, prove it.
Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-----Original Message----- From: C. E. White Sent: Friday, March 16, 2007 9:19 AM To: Cathy Douds Subject: Question about the nature of the WMI
Dear Ms. Douds,
I need your help in understanding the nature of the WMI portion of an automotive VIN as applied to vehicles manufactured in the US. I've noticed that US assembled vehicles don't always have a "1" as the first digit of the VIN. Sometimes the first digit is a "4" or a "5". What is the significance of the different first digits? Does this digit indicate a difference in the domestic content of the vehicle? Can I assume that a vehicle with a "1" for the first digit includes more domestically produced content than a vehicle with a "4" or a "5". Or, for instance, can I assume that a Toyota with a "5" for the first digit of the VIN has such a low level of domestic content that it does not qualify as a "domestic" vehicle?
I would appreciate you assistance in this matter.
Regards,
C. E. White *****************************************************
Will you please stop claiming that WMIs are related to domestic content.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

***BULLSHIT WARNING***
Mike Hunter is living in an alternate universe where the first digit of the VIN is tied to the domestic contnet. In "our" universe this is not true (or at least Mike cannot prove that it is true).
Ask Mike why Lincoln Navigators have a "5" for the first digit while Ford Expeditions have a "1" for the first digit even though they are built in the same plant with parts mostly sourced from the same locations. Ask Mike why Mercury Mariners get a "4" for the first digit while the almost identical Ford Escapes get a "4". Ask ask Mike why Mustang V-6 Automatics still get a "1" for the first digit even though they don't include enough domestic parts to be considered domestic vehicles.
And most improtantly, ask Mike where's the proof of his claim that the first digit of teh VIN has anything to do with domestic content.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That is ease, although the vehicles you referenced are built on the same assembly line they do not have the same US content . The bodies are the some but the trim, grills and many other parts are NOT the same, and come from Canada and not the US. Parts are made in Canada do not count as US content to meet the US Departments of Commerce standard to get a '1'
mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What standard of the Department of Commerce? Why is the Department of Commerce involved when the Department of Transportation is assigned the task of assigning VINs? (The Department of Transportation contracts this out the Socitety of Automotive Engineers.) Don't you think there would some documentation someplace? I mean we are talking about the VIN. This standard is not even hinted at on any web site I have seen, including the web site of the vehicle manufacturers, when they have the VIN info.
Gee, get a clue.
jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

More pure bullshit.
You have to quit making this stuff up. There is no way that there is enoguh difference in a Exporer and a Mountaineer for your statemetn to be true.
Why do Mustangs get a "1" if the WMI indicates domestic contnet? The average Mustang only has 70% domestic (US + Canadian) content, and V-6 Automatic Mustangs must have significantly less than average since they use a German built Engine and a French built transmission.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-----Original Message----- From: C. E. White Sent: Friday, March 16, 2007 9:19 AM To: Cathy Douds Subject: Question about the nature of the WMI
Dear Ms. Douds,
I need your help in understanding the nature of the WMI portion of an automotive VIN as applied to vehicles manufactured in the US. I've noticed that US assembled vehicles don't always have a "1" as the first digit of the VIN. Sometimes the first digit is a "4" or a "5". What is the significance of the different first digits? Does this digit indicate a difference in the domestic content of the vehicle? Can I assume that a vehicle with a "1" for the first digit includes more domestically produced content than a vehicle with a "4" or a "5". Or, for instance, can I assume that a Toyota with a "5" for the first digit of the VIN has such a low level of domestic content that it does not qualify as a "domestic" vehicle?
I would appreciate you assistance in this matter.
Regards,
C. E. White *****************************************************
Will you please stop claiming that WMIs are related to domestic content.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Here is a list for 2004 Model Year Cars -
http://www.levelfieldinstitute.org/docs/lfi-domestic-content.pdf
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That refers to NAP content that includes Canada and imoprted parts assembled in the US and/or Canada, not US content
mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
C. E. White wrote:

The biggest problem with the labels is that labor is not included as part of the content. A Ford built in Mexico can have higher domestic content than a Toyota built in California, but the latter is built in a UAW plant providing living wages to workers. This suits the purposes of the U.S. based automakers who are desperately trying to move as much assembly outside the U.S. as possible, while touting "domestic content."
A vehicle that truly has high domestic content, and is assembled in the U.S., has no advantage (in terms of the label) over a vehicle that is manufactured elsewhere in North America with low domestic content. People pay no attention to the label anymore. OTOH, the Japanese manufacturers have done a good job of publicizing the fact that most of their mass marked vehicles are manufactured in the U.S..
The best way to support the U.S. economy is to buy vehicles made in the U.S.. You'll never figure out the true domestic content, so just go by where the factory is. This is especially useful for the Japanese companies, since they are sourcing as many components from the U.S. as possible because they want the component manufacturing close to the factory, and because they want to be shielded from currency issues caused by the massive U.S. deficits, courtesy of George Bush.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.