Ok, I'm open minded

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That's swell, but vehicles are a unique product in this regard. For one thing, I can't think of any other product of this expense magnitude that can be purchased by the general public and warranteed across the country. Another point (relating to my original question) is the unbelievable hoops a company must jump through to qualify as a warranty provider for auto manufacturers. I still don't know exactly what kind of shop Mike was describing, even with his latest response. It's not like anything I've seen before.
If Joe Blow owns a general purpose auto repair shop and decides he wants to provide warranty service for GM, my first question would be "why?!" The cost to impliment would be outrageous, and without actually going 100% and building a dealership, there would be no revenue from new car sales. There would be no built in customer pay repair/service customer base from new sales. Without increased interest in his customer pay operations, the warranty reimbursement wouldn't make the bills, let alone any sense.
Toyota MDT in MO
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I told you what was required of our fleet service shops, and our techs, to be allowed to do warranty work. I never said that was all that we did for fleets
We did ALL of the service work for hundreds of government and corporate fleets, not only warranty work. Unlike rental car companies, fleet vehicles are just another "tool" used in their business, not their "product."
Corporate vehicle are provide with excellent preventive maintenance because they generally keep their vehicles in service, for the five years or 300K WOF, because of federal corporate tax depreciation laws.. Some like highway patrol cars and particularly Korean "courier cars" easily get to 100K in a year or less and run out of any warranty.
By the way BEFORE a dealer builds his dealership he must buy a franchise, as well.
After a few years I sold vehicles to fleets as well, but like all fleet sales in the US, I had to purchase the vehicles from the franchised dealerships of the Group where I had been working. Fleets nor anybody else can buy directly from manufactures in the US, with the exception of Toyota, they must come through the dealerships. Toyota has "Distributers" that sell to dealers. They can and do sell directly to corporate fleets and rental car companies, as well.
wrote:

That's swell, but vehicles are a unique product in this regard. For one thing, I can't think of any other product of this expense magnitude that can be purchased by the general public and warranteed across the country. Another point (relating to my original question) is the unbelievable hoops a company must jump through to qualify as a warranty provider for auto manufacturers. I still don't know exactly what kind of shop Mike was describing, even with his latest response. It's not like anything I've seen before.
If Joe Blow owns a general purpose auto repair shop and decides he wants to provide warranty service for GM, my first question would be "why?!" The cost to impliment would be outrageous, and without actually going 100% and building a dealership, there would be no revenue from new car sales. There would be no built in customer pay repair/service customer base from new sales. Without increased interest in his customer pay operations, the warranty reimbursement wouldn't make the bills, let alone any sense.
Toyota MDT in MO
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Nor did I imply you typed such.

Makes sense.

Agreed.
It sure seems like the large rental "fleets" can buy directly from the manufacturers.

Yup, Toyotas distributors are regional, and it makes sense. Did you know there are two Toyota regional operations remaining that are independent of Toyota Corporate?
Toyota MDT in MO
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It may seem that way, but to do so would violate US franchise laws

No I did not.
wrote:

Nor did I imply you typed such.

Makes sense.

Agreed.
It sure seems like the large rental "fleets" can buy directly from the manufacturers.

Yup, Toyotas distributors are regional, and it makes sense. Did you know there are two Toyota regional operations remaining that are independent of Toyota Corporate?
Toyota MDT in MO
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In article

Maybe because it doesn't happen for another 8 years.
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I do not know of a fleet that performs their own warranty repairs either, we did it for our fleet customers.
wrote:

Thank you. Without further explanation the original statement didn't make sense, hence my question. I've never been witness to a fleet that performed their own manufacturer's warranty repair. It seems like a lot of work and $ to go through when you could hire low paid drivers to shuttle cars back to the dealership(s) instead. Did your fleet purchase agreements eliminate dealership warranty service as an option to save money?
Toyota MDT in MO
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Got nothing to do with 'what I believe,' I just showed you proof that the price of the part in question is NOT dictated by whatever Toyota pricing scheme [that] exists in your mind.

All that proves is that you know everything about price and nothing about value.
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You are free to believe whatever you wish.
wrote:

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When you say "in my shops," is this from the time when you were group sales manager?
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Of course not, I was in sales them, it was when I owned the fleet service business.
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And your NEW American car will possibly have a linear air fuel ratio sensor too. It won't be $65 I can assure you. Nor is the factory correct part for most current american production vehicles.

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do the math ...
you pay more for a toyota in the long run ...
with more parts purchase ...
then you do for a BMW on the same run, with less to purchase.
in article 49a5debb$0$31040$ snipped-for-privacy@news-radius.ptd.net, Mike Hunter at mikehunt2@lycos/com wrote on 2/25/09 4:13 PM:

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Alan B. Mac Farlane wrote:

BMW parts ain't cheap. If you are buying a car based on cheap parts, don't get a Toyota or BMW. Get a Chevy.
BTW, the cost of repair parts for a 84 Cavalier that I used to own was dirt cheap. The 2.0 liter OHV engine was somehow able to get 27 mpg, I've not been able to figure out how it was able to do that. My Subaru and Toyota and Ford Taurus were able to get a maximum of 22 mpg. Strange. I hated that Subaru - that engine was awful. :-)
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If you are buying a car based on the price of parts, buy an OLD Chevy. Or an OLD Ford.
Likely cheaper to get parts for a 1960's Ford than anything. Just about any part you could want is available as a repop for less than the parts for a current car.
If you want a car that's not likely to need many parts for a while, buy a new Honda (with a 6 year bumper to bumper warranty you won't be buying them anyway).
If you don't care how often it is in the shop, just don't want to have to pay for it, by a MitsoShitty - 10 year warranty now I'm hearing?
Or a Hyundai/Kia.
Excellent warranty, and slightly better car than a Mitsu. Just figure on it being in for repairs a little oftener than some - but what the Hay - you're not paying, right??????
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Long warranties sound good but the fact is only around 2% of new vehicle buyers keep that new vehicle, as their daily driver, for ten years.
The average new vehicle buyer in the US replaces that vehicle with another new vehicle in three to four years, with only 45K to 60K on the odometer. Most often price in the deterring factor.
Advertising a long warrant may get them in the store, but in my many years of retail experience as Group Sales Manager selling just about every brand, the most often asked question before the buyer signed on the dotted line was; 'How much is the monthly payment?'
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On Thu, 26 Feb 2009 18:23:40 -0500, "Mike Hunter"

You were a group sales manager? You were a car salesman for many years?
Well, that puts all you write into perspective as to how much confidence to associate with your remarks. Thanks for mentioning it.
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Who would YOU expect to have the most accurate knowledge about automobile sales, the manager at the Wal-Mart or McDonalds were you work LOL
wrote Re Re: Ok, I'm open minded:

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'll have to pass on your recommendations for a used or new car. Nether seems like a very wise choice. :-)
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You have got to be kidding, right? Actually TODAY is a very good time to buy any vehicle, new or used. The is the best "buyers market" in many years. Even Toyota dealers have dropped their $2,500 package and are discounting big time to move their huge overstock of unsold cars.
wrote:>> Or a Hyundai/Kia.

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