Re: ST220 fuel type ~~~rabimec~~~ says.......

Yeah Hi NTL
The ST220 will run with the 95 octane but the 98 octane is definitely better for the fuel economy because the whole engine management has been programmed
really for 98 "Super". Depending on calibration of PCM your Ford Dealer can reprograme PCM and can chose which octane level you want to drive with. Not to mention the slight increase of HP you get with the 98 octane but better reaction and take on when you press the gas pedal. You'd only notice the slight differences if you were driving before on 95 and switched to 98..... if you really knew your car. You can drive with the 95, no problem but in the long run, depending on how you drive and if you want to keep the car for a long while, if you want to save your Engines Catalyst Converters I would go for the 98 octane.
It's not like the Focus RS that needs ONLY 98 octane!! Your choice really. Oh yeah we are in EUROPE we got 98 and 95 octane unleaded lol
~~~rabimec~~~

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Hi,
Thanks. I was concerned that it might end up cost a rediculous amount of money to run an ST220 if it only drinks Super. At around 80-83p/litre here, Super is a small investment !!
It's nice to know both will be ok.
When I eventually find a UK dealer with one for me to test drive, I might be able to buy one !!
Couldn't remember what fuel was available across the channel, I just knew that in the US their fuel is all low octane !
Adge

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Is the fuel in Europe really that high octane or is it just that they use RON instead of RON+MON\2? It seems odd to me that a country with so many low performance 4 cyl subcompact cars would be using fuel of that high octane. Over here your typical econo-box doesn't need high octane, and I'd imagine the higher compression would increase the rate of wear and reduce the miles you get out of the engine. Doesn't seem like a good thing for a place where most cars seem to be purely for utility value. Of course I may just be talking nonsense and it has no significant affect on the wear of an engine. I would just think an 9.0:1 CR engine would last longer than a 13:1 CR engine.

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Cory Dunkle opined in

Actually........
;)
The reverse is true, Higher per driver capita of car "enthusiasts" in europe.
North America is place where MOST treat car as utilitarian.
See my other post about the octane.. they are basically the same
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wrote:

They use the RON figure as the "octane rating" for a fuel, rather than the USA, which uses the average of the RON and MON figures, as you point out. Since the MON figure is always lower, a USA octane rating will always be lower than a European octane rating for the same fuel.
This is a common misunderstanding, it seems.
Jon
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ok forget that last question @ cory I just saw http://www.ibmwr.org/otech/octane.html which pretty much explained it all, thanks guys.
~~~rabimec~~~

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ok forget that last question @ cory I just saw http://www.ibmwr.org/otech/octane.html which pretty much explained it all, thanks guys.
~~~rabimec~~~

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