The Next F-150

Greetings, It is past time to take the automobile experience to the next level. All automobiles should come equipped with flight sticks on the center console.
HP already has plenty of technology already available to bring this to life. We as a culture, are used to Ford bringing new advancements to common life.
The removal of the wheel will reduce injuries, eliminate injuries related to airbag exhaust and impact with the wheel. The driver's dash will look like the passenger side with gauges, and the pedals will remain the same, for a little while anyway.
Next, we can link up to satellites and get back the luxury that we had with horses. Take me home, take me home, safely... Just say the address and the luxury transportation pod does the rest. Climate control becomes the biggest concern of the occupants along with tending to that important phone call, email, book, DVD, or Satellite broadcast. Welcome to today.
We still need the thrill of speed and race tracks are good places to test ones driving skills. The safety of the tracks needs much improvement. We need to incorporate nets instead of concrete and metal. It helps on impact. Save our test pilots please. I remember a time when we used sand embankments to slow down the cars. Once we pulled them out of the trees behind the ramp we decided to upgrade to concrete and metal. Sudden stops, while easier to sweep up the pieces, also have lethal tendencies for the driver.
Richmond International Raceway is a good example of track size and configuration. It is only missing the dome, night clubs, hotel, restaurants, and everything else that makes life a pleasure to live. The fans want it, and it would be nice to give it to them.
Enter driving schools to learn how to properly operate a vehicle. Start in the lower classes until safe and responsible performance merits a higher class. With any luck all drivers will strive for an A and achieve the absolute goal of safe operation of vehicles.
A racing "legend" was involved in a mishap today. In the process, the oil line was torn off his car. In the spur of the moment, the driver proceeded to drive around the track oiling the entire surface making it a nightmare for other drivers. This was a rookie mistake. The pilot knows this as well.
Fortunately, a responsible driver was also involved who illustrated the proper way to handle the situation. Bring the vehicle to a stop. Observe the surroundings. When it is clear to do so pull the vehicle down to the apron, away from the driving surface. Wait for safety crews to come and contain the mess. Evacuate the vehicle only if there is clear and present danger or wait for instructions from the paramedics.
Any type of collision will result in trauma that requires proper training not common to every one at this time. Remember these "professionals" have the honor of tutoring the viewers. Believe me, they take these lessons to the streets. Poor lessons yield poor drivers and unsafe conditions. More safe drivers are needed to fill the role as instructor.
A topic that should be discussed after every race is how the incidents can be avoided in the future. Believe it or not, there are many racers watching. A micro-percentage of which run on the appropriate courses. I stand behind our commitment to a safe life that is very entertaining, and I hope the rest of you do as well.
Just some thoughts for those who like to think about what is and what could be.
Thank you,
Philip G. Charbonneau Class A CDL Operator and Racer President and co-founder TheRaceDepot.com, Inc. snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
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Philip G. Charbonneau wrote:

Your scenario can happen none too soon for me. I've had my fill of self-important business types reading from a document laying across the steering wheel as they talk on the cell phone and fly by me at 85-90 miles per hour. Or some yakking soccer mom in her SUV holding a cell phone to her ear with one hand and glibly gesturing with the other while her infant is strapped in the back seat and who knows who is aiming the vehicle.
If you have a Class A CDL, Philip, I'm guessing its California and not Conneticutt and you have witnessed the aforementioned yourself multiple times. Alas, I'm sure it happens in Conneticutt, too. And just about everywhere else.
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From Massachusetts actually, but traveled 38 of the 50 states including CA. Glad to know that I'm not the only one paying attention on the road, Thank you.

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That's been done. One of the GM Futura cars back in the fifties had a stick to drive the car. Moving the stick left or right activated the steering. Pulling back applied throttle and pushing forward applied braking. Ford had a similar system with two small wheels into which the driver inserted his hands. The fly by wire engine controls, like on my 04 Lincoln LS, should make it simple. ;)
mike hunt
"Philip G. Charbonneau" wrote:

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