S10 blower resistor/HVAC

My 1996's S10 blower quit working. My AC was out too, so i did not pay much attention to it this summer. I looked at it over the weekend and found the resistor pack in the air plenum under the hood.
I had one of these fail in my old Mazda B2000, and it melted the resistors in 1/2. This unit had the resistors intact. BUT, there are thermal inline fuses with the resistors. There are three of these and they all seem to be open circuit. I pulled another resistor pack out of a parts truck and it seems to work. The real question is why the thermal fuses blew.
I seem to recall last winter sometimes the blower would work, and sometimes it would not. Then i would play with the switch and it would usually come back on. So, what would cause this? My theory is the blower motor is somehow freezing up and causing high current draw? The blower motor does not make any funny noises like a bearing going out or such. It seems to work on all speeds now.
Also, sometimes it seems i am getting hot air out of the vents when the blower is off and the temp is all the way cold. Did the S10's have a problem with the air door actuator? Do you really have to take the dash off to get to this or can go go through the glove box.?
Bob
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Could be the motor was overloaded. Could be the resistors increased in value, got hot, and blew the thermal fuses. Could be it was just damn hot under the hood and the thermal fuses blew (which I saw this summer, and would never have believed if I hadn't seen it).

Could be the motor sticking, or it could be a bad switch.

I'd put a couple drops of light oil on each of the motor bearings, and make sure the motor feels good and even when you turn it, just in case. Even if it doesn't fix a current problem, it will prevent future problems. A turbine oil or sewing machine oil is good; you want something that will not varnish up in the heat.

It sounds like yours has a problem with the actuator, at least. --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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Hey Bob - I don't know exactly what the S10 uses, but many of the GM cars use the rotary switches for the heater control and for the temperature control. These do fail with a high resistance at the contacts. Symptoms are very similar to blown resistor packs, and I've often thought there was a chicken and egg syndrome at work there. I have cleaned up the contacts on some of these switches and they've lasted a couple of years with no further problems. Most times I've found them to be toast and had to replace them.
If this is where you problem lies, the dealer option is very expensive. This is a good item for car-part.com.
BTW - I played with George's new LS-9 yesterday. Bob - it's a great desk.
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-Mike-
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Mike Marlow wrote:

I don't know how high resistance contacts would cause the thermal fuses to go in the resistors packs, but it could certain cause the fan to be intermittent. I also found there is a relay in series with the fan.

I have a nice Series 5 soundcraft here that's looking for a home. 5 or 10 years ago, tons of people would have wanted one. These days, everyone once the smaller digital desk.
Basically, a LS9 is a stripped down M7cl. The M7 i sold the client wanted and external power supply. The dam cable to hook the PS to the desk lists for $ 750! That's nuts. If Yamaha made the M7 sell for 9995.00 US they would own the market.
Bob
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