WARNING: GM's standard operating proceedure

Saturn (GM) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEEDURE
When we at GM discover an epidemic costly flaw in our cars (like casting flaws in our cylinder heads that will cause the head to
eventually CRACK); and before we become aware of the problem, tens of thousands of cars with the flaw have gone off the assembly line to dealers:
We withold that information (sending out a service notice) for as long as we can- so as to get as many of those cars affected, OVER the warranty period. That way, we are not liable to cover the cost of the repair or replacement and we are able to cut our loses!
Also: If a new car customer who has been taking his car to the dealer for regular scheduled maintainance, CHANGES ADDRESS, and the dealer fails to notify the company of the new address and because of this dealer failure- we send out a service notice to the old address and thus the notice never reaches the customer:
When the service notice is returned to us as "undeliverable"; we will NOT make any attempt to reach the customer at his new address and notify him of the service notice. We are not liable for our dealer's failure to notify us of the customer's new address, nor will we take any action against our dealer for this failure in an attempt to compensate the customer,should he have been unaware of the notice and suffers a costly repair bill after his warranty has run out!
Anyone who doubts the above policy can contact (among many others): Grand Rapids (Michigan) Saturn.
(That is; if anyone there has the knowledge of and COURAGE to verify the above policy) signed.
Michael Cohrman snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
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Oh poor misterfact. He's a victim of today's widespread lack of personal responsibility. He feels no snese of responsibility to notify GM, yet expecting that GM may have need to reach him, expects that both GM and the dealership should assume all obligations for locating his whereabouts. Apparently misterfact has never heard of those change of address cards that are *free* from the post office.

Courage? In capital letters? As if your bubble headed irresponsible actions warrant a courageous act on anyone else's part. How about this - if you had taken responsibility for your own affairs you wouldn't be making a fool of yourself in a public forum now.
--

-Mike-
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On Wed, 7 Jun 2006 14:51:45 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

Actually, there should be no need to notify GM OR the dealer of his address change. Typically GM will use vehicle registration info as the address of where to reach the owner. This info is more accurate than relying on a dealer or consumer to update GM. This implies that the vehicle is legally registered with a proper street address.

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Or that the owner took the time to change the address on his registration.
--

-Mike-
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Mike Marlow wrote:

sent us all sorts or promotional material about buying another piece of crap from them. Did they notify the company of ou new address (Which GM states IS their policy):
No! (Like I have to ntify GM of my new address TEN TIMES before they get it right! yeh, sure!)
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personal
the
that
and sent us all sorts or promotional material about buying another piece of crap from them. Did they notify the company of ou new address (Which GM states IS their policy):

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

There is a culture that exists with all the big three to deny a problem exists until so far down the line that retaining good will is no longer possible. Eventually, they may pay a bunch of policy claims or court ordered repairs, but the customer is going to a competitor by then. They did not used to care about it because it was like they were all exchanging their underwear. But now there are options beyond the big three, leaving them all without their shorts and exposed more and more.
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And this differs from most manufactueres in what way? See Toyota Sludge and Ball Joints. See Nissan transmissions. Etc. Etc. Etc.
Ed
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This sounds like it was written by a high school student, not a business executive. I don't doubt this sort of thing is done, but the "policy" sounds very amateurish.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I worked for both GM and Ford in this area years ago. It's not so much a policy to defraud so to speak as much as the combined conflicts of the various factions within the companies. Engineering won't admit to an error. Design changes take forever to perfect and in the meantime, production goes on. The financial side can't get approval to make reimbursements. Nobody wants to officially recall anything lest the press have a field day with it. So they end up with a program whereby the noisiest, most litigious customers get something and the rest be dammed.
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This is a post that I can believe.
Al, can you tell me why it took so long for GM to stop brazing the body panels below the rear windows?
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Seconded. While the actions of a large corporation may seem evil or designed to screw John Q. Public, the reality is that big corporations have a really hard time dealing with defective products. Partly because it's not usually the department who is responsible for the error that has to pay for it. If the engineering department made an error it would be easier (not easy, but easier) to get their department to pay than it would to get the PR department to pay for it, though the PR department may end up footing the bill. There are a lot of other reasons as well, and companies should have very clear-cut policies for handling errors as quickly as possible to minimize the damage to their brand name and thus their PR hit, but it's obvious they don't.
Ok, I do know that sometimes executives do make unfair decisions designed to save the company money by screwing some of their customers. I'm not saying it doesn't happen. I'm only saying that incompetence is far more widespread than evil intent.
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It would have to be a high school student who got at best a D in English. An average high school student could do better.
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