wire within braided wire

I've noticed on wiring connected to various magnetic pickups (crank sensor wires, aftermarket cruise control pickups) that instead of using two separate wires it uses a central wire with the other wire "braided"
around it like a sheath...with insulation then enshrouding the whole thing. Seems like that wire would be much more expensive than running two normal wires, and it doesn't seem like it would be inherently any more resistant to outside interference. What is the fuction of this arrangement and can two separate wires perform the same function?
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The outer braid is a shield. Usually it's ground. It used on low level signals they don't want noise in. Other uses are for microphone cable and TV antenna cable.
Al
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My aftermarket cruise quit working and I suspect the problem is in the above mentioned type of wire--which goes to the pickup (magnets-on-driveshaft type). I'm sure I can't procure any more wire of that type so I want to try to just use a couple of ordinary wires to run to the pickup. I can see how any outside interference could disrupt that faint pulse signal. What would be the optimal way to shield this wire from interference (plugwire noise, etc)? Taping the hell out of it? Running it inside an old hose? Or would that make no difference & not be worth the trouble.
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Radio Shack sells shielded two-conductor cable that you could probably use for your application. You wouldn't have to use the second wire, but you would need to ensure that the shield is connected to the same place as your present shield.
Tape and hose are useless as a barrier to EMI.

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Shielded cable is available in LOTS of places. Using separate wires will almost guarantee that it will not work. It needs to be shielded. Tape and hose are NOT shielding. Just go to Radio Shack or most auto parts places and they will have it on spools. If you want to order it online there are lots of places that sell it there as well.
What does the cruise control do? Why do you suspect the cable?
--
Steve Williams


"James Goforth" < snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net> wrote in message
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The cruise simply quit working although there were no blown fuses & voltage to the controls, no missing magnets. I just now got under it and determined it is indeed that shielded cable (broken in a hard-to-see place). So is that wire just basically another, smaller version of coaxial? Anyway, I work right next to a Radd Shack!! Thanks for the input. Saved me a bunch of messing around.
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It is coaxial, just a smaller type used for low voltage signals and thinner so that it is flexible.
--
Steve W.


"Gomer Einstein" < snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net> wrote in message
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (James Goforth) wrote in

The more faint the signal, the more susceptable to interference. But it will probably work OK. I would TWIST the pair of wires tho. The twist itself will help Its a network cable trick...
--
1984 RZ350

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James Goforth wrote:

reduced induced interference on low voltage signal circuits
nate
--
replace "fly" with "com" to reply.
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
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