Can I get my money back?

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Last night I went into a Honda dealer and agreed to purchase a new car. I really wanted to pay at most $300 a month, over 5 years, but the dealer said
that would not be possible because of the overall cost of the car.The initial quote the dealer gave me was $395 a month for 5 years. I said that was too much.Then he asked "Could you do $330 a month?" and I said ok. . I thought he meant $330 a month for 5 years. Wouldn't you? . So,as I was going over the contract when I went home, the contract said over a period of 6 years, not 5. I had told the dealer that I could not do 6 years and yet, that was what was on the contract. I was so tired last night that I do not know how I could have signed the contract. Anyway, this morning, I went back to the dealer and told them that I did not realize that it stated 6 years, after we had discussed 5 years.The thing is, I had made a $1000 deposit, which I was told is non-refundable if, after they order the car and it comes in in 2-3 weeks, I decide I don't want it anymore. I would get back the money if after ordering the car and it arrives, I take the car. Listen, I ordered the car last night and I went back to the dealer this morning,less than 12 hours after. The car won't be at the dealership til 2-3 weeks. Why can't I get the money back? Is that legal for them to keep it, when I was told that I would NOT get it back AFTER the car arrives and I decide I don't want it anymore?
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I cant imagine a reputable dealer that would not return your money after 12 hours and you have not picked up the car. I would head for the general managers office or the dealer owner. They have tried to pull some funny business with you and were not successful. I would tell them to refund my money or my next call will be to the Better Business Bureau. Let us know how you come out. Scott
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zonie wrote:

Do you think that if I stop the check, they will take me to Collections for it? That is another matter that I couln't be bothered with. I know I don't want the car anymore because I was deceived.
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zonie wrote:

Thanks a lot. I will let you know on Monday; that's when the manager will be at work. Wanted to stop the check, but it might not be such a good idea.
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I would not rule stopping the check out. It would depend on whether there was anything in writing concerning the deposit, and how obnoxious they had been so far. Also, whether there is another dealer near you with whom you can work.
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When ever you go into a dealer, don't fall into the "what payments do you want" trap. Work out the best price for the car first, then work out financing.
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BTW, in many states, you have the right to withdraw on the deal within 72 hours.
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Does the contract itself say anything about the terms of the deposit?
Things you don't have going for you: You signed a contract, indicating you had read it.
Things going for you: Barely a day has gone by. Demand to see the salesperson's supervisor, then his/her supervisor, and on up. Tell them what happened. Explain you will tell everyone you know what happened and that you will not bring your car there for service, nor will you ever buy another car from them.
Do not trust anything that comes out of the salesperson's mouth. Get any promises in writing.
Read the April issue of Consumer Reports for tips on buying a new car. Also, google for tips on doing so.
If a person goes in unarmed to a dealership, the person will be sharkmeat. There is nothing like the car business as far as unethical, dishonest, practices go.

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Elle wrote:

Thanks for yor help

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| Last night I went into a Honda dealer and agreed to purchase a new car. I | really wanted to pay at most $300 a month, over 5 years, but the dealer said | that would not be possible because of the overall cost of the car.The initial | quote the dealer gave me was $395 a month for 5 years. I said that was too | much.Then he asked "Could you do $330 a month?" and I said ok. . I thought he | meant $330 a month for 5 years. Wouldn't you? . So,as I was going over the | contract when I went home, the contract said over a period of 6 years, not 5. | I had told the dealer that I could not do 6 years and yet, that was what was | on the contract. I was so tired last night that I do not know how I could | have signed the contract. Anyway, this morning, I went back to the dealer and | told them that I did not realize that it stated 6 years, after we had | discussed 5 years.The thing is, I had made a $1000 deposit, which I was told | is non-refundable if, after they order the car and it comes in in 2-3 weeks, | I decide I don't want it anymore. I would get back the money if after | ordering the car and it arrives, I take the car. Listen, I ordered the car | last night and I went back to the dealer this morning,less than 12 hours | after. The car won't be at the dealership til 2-3 weeks. Why can't I get the | money back? Is that legal for them to keep it, when I was told that I would | NOT get it back AFTER the car arrives and I decide I don't want it anymore?
If the deal involves applying for financing and dealer is made aware of that, then if the application for financing falls through, you may have an out. There's a cancellation provision in the law for failed financing.
At if you are stuck with it, however, you are probably getting a signficantly better vehicle since it's worth $4,000 more. Considering Hondas hold up well on resale, you'll get a chunk of that back later. Until then, you'll be driving a nicer vehicle than you originally wanted to buy.
Be happy and charge it to experience.
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Figaro wrote:

I won't be driving a nicer vehicle than I originally wanted to buy. It's the original car, just more payments. I really am stressing over this. How can I be happy when I have $1000 on the line and I KNOW I don't want to pay so much for the car. I cannot afford to.
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">>

Here's another idea: Pull the money out of the account and force the check to bounce; pay the bounced check fee's. wouldn't that force the financing to fall through?
There's probably holes it this way's logic; and I'd probably just follow Michael's advise; and cancel the check-- but hey, this teaches us all a good lesson.
Steve
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That would be criminal check fraud.

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Steve
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Cancel the check and call the dealer's general manager. Let him know that you are not happy and feel that you were deceived about the loan terms. If he gets tough, tell him that you will call the better business bureau, your state's attorney general office, and the local newspaper or TV station.
The worst thing that can happen is that you will have to write another check and take the car. Once that check clears you will have to go to court to get your money. If the check has cleared, small claims court will be you best option.
A lawyer once told me there was no such thing as a non-refundable deposit. Depending on your state, you might have certain legal rights that will make it a cut and dry matter. Some states have a 3 day buyers remorse period.
Last but not least. Never tell a dealer how mush you want to spend. Never go on a car lot without knowing what you want, how much to pay for it, and pre-arranged financing. When you openly shop based upon a payment amount, you are doomed to over pay for the car and finance options.
Good luck and don't be afraid of these guys.
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Mike Phillips wrote:

Thanks a lot.
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It depends on where you are. Here in Arizona there is a 3 business day "buyer's remorse" period that attaches to all purchase contracts.
A friend was subjected to about the same thing several years ago, when he stated no more than $200 per month for no more than 48 months. The salesweasel shot him over a dozen proposals that were either too much money or too many months. Ultimately the snake came up with a contract and went over the terms as he pointed them out: just under $200 per month for 48 months. The problem: the contract actually said 60 months, and my friend didn't notice that until the financing finalized a week later. He called the Attorney General's office and was advised to go back and try to work it out with a friend present... that was me. Predictably, the dealer sent person after person back to work him over various ways over a period of two hours. The breakthrough came when I offered to take him home so he could leave the car there until it was settle in court. The dealer found it very unnerving that I would not say exactly what our relationship was and that I was the one talking about fraud, rather than their customer. Eventually they renegotiated to match his stated requirements.
Anyway, a call to your state's Attorney General office should give you some good advice. In the meantime, I suggest you send a letter by registered mail to the dealer ASAP explaining why you feel the contract was made under duress and that you want to rescind your agreement. Note that they have not delivered the vehicle and you do not intend to take delivery until the situation is remedied. Having that on record can't hurt.
Or there is the direct action approach I found one woman taking: picketing on the sidewalk in front of the dealership with a sign saying they mistreated you when you bought a car. Remember - stay on public property and keep moving (so you aren't loitering). Somebody will be out *very* soon, I guarantee it. Don't be intimidated, and if a policeman shows up follow his directions.
Mike
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Michael Pardee wrote:

Thanks alot. Do you think it will be wise to canncel the check? Maybe I should go that route. I live in NC and unfortunately, I can't get in contact with a lawyer before Monday morning- that's when I KNOW the dealer will be taking the check to the bank. Don't want to run the risk of '"waiting too late."
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Who is the dealer and what is the NC city?
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It is a drastic step since you need a solid reason to cancel it, but if done in conjunction with the letter it is probably a good idea. It would be hard to get the deposit back otherwise, and doing so will jam up the works on the contract you want to nullify. The sooner the better on that.
Mike
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