Hyundai's borrowed technology (from other makers)

Right after i purchased my 2000 Sonata new, I was told by a couple informed people that Hyundai borrowed certain technology for their cars ; If i remember correctly, the suspension was Mercedes Benz, the
electronics from Bosch, and there were a couple others too (which perhaps someone in this NG can bring to light.)
Is this still the case with current production Hyundai's ? Just curious. Thanks.
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Most of what I think these people were referring to was the Asians' tendency to copy things. And Hyundai's been good at copying other products.
The 2.4L 4 cyl in the 2000 Sonata is a purely Mitsubishi design, with Hyundai manufacturing under license from Mitsubishi. The transmission is a similar deal with Mitsubishi. The 2.7L v6 appears very similar to some Mitsubishi engines, but I don't believe it's Mitsubishi's design, per se.
As for the electronics, I believe the 2.4 used Mitsubishi while the 2.7 used Bosch. In either event, Hyundai did what's called reverse engineering. They took a computer system that had already been designed for fuel and transmission management and built the system around it, while making the necessary changes to the software.
As for current vehicles, there's still some collaboration. Despite the fact that Hyundai claimed their transmissions were all new for the 2006 Sonata, they were really (at least in my opinion) nothing more than revisions of transmissions already in use. I questioned my instructor about this point and received an answer something like the friction material being on one side of each metal, instead of having a two-sided friction disc between each two metals. Big deal. In my opinion, although somewhat more refined, there aren't any wholesale changes in the transmissions when compared to your 2000 Sonata.
The 2.4L 4 cylinder now in use was designed by GEMA (Global Engine Manufacturing Alliance), a joint venture between Daimler-Chrysler, Hyundai, and Mitsubishi. I've heard no indications that the 3.3 and 3.8 v6 have design anywhere except Hyundai, but that doesn't imply they're not someone else's engine designs. When Hyundai first began using DOHC engines in 1992, the claim was that they were "Hyundai" engines, when in fact they were nothing more than Mitsubishi designs manufactured by Hyundai, complete with the Mitsubishi design flaws/weaknesses.
I'd have to reread my course materials, but I believe Hyundai is moving toward using Delphi as their electronics designer/manufacturer on all their car lines. I've already seen on 2006 Sonatas-- this would also apply to the Azera and Entourage-- components that now look like they came off a GM product. This doesn't mean that Hyundai is using GM technology, but is likely to mean that the system has again been reverse designed. I.e., Hyundai took a computer system that had already been designed, installed the necessary components (which look like GM components since both use the same system), and made minor changes to the software.
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Interesting info. Thanks H.T.
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On Fri, 30 Jun 2006 19:39:01 -0400, "hyundaitech"

Delphi has been spun off GM and told to find other customers. They are in bankruptcy and in the process of signficantly reducing the number of factories they have as well as the pay of the remaining workers. Rumor has it that Hyundai also approached the old Rochester Products (I don't recall their current name) about wiper motors for their US plant and was told they would make them in China but not the US so Hyundai declined to do business with them. This would lead me to think Hyundai may be buying the components from US suppliers as a way to keep up US content.
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The radio in my 06 Sonata is made by Visteon which used to be part of Ford. Like Delphi, they'll sell parts to anyone with cash to spend. In theory, everybody wins.
I like the idea of sharing parts and ideas instead of every company reinventing everything. Why make your own small engine when you can buy one from GEMA? Why invent an entire hybrid system when you can license one and get it to market faster?
Why does every town in the country need their very own custom schools and administrative buildings? Think of all the money and time that could be saved if there was a standardized school building, city hall, etc. The automakers and Walmart -where nearly every store layout fits into just a handful of different formats- are already doing it.
nothermark wrote:

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PMDR wrote:

doing. Infact the editorial column in the July 2006 issue of Car and Driver talks about this. To Quote from there... "Vehicles as distinct as the original Audi TT and contempory Volkswage Golf, the Nissan 350Z sports car and Infiniti FX35/FX45 SUV, and the Ford Five Hundred sedan and Volvo XC90 SUV share many mechanical and structural components." They go on to say... "In fact, in todays world there are hardly any vehicles priced below $150,000 that don't use a common platform. Furthermore when it comes to major components such as engines, transmissions, brakes, and electronic controls, even the megabuck machines do some sharing." I mean think of it a sports car & an SUV having slightly customized verssions of the same platform! I guess it helps all of us when you pay for either of them as there is less of R & D costs to factor ....
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A while back my son was into fancy "BMX" bicycles for jumping and off-road racing. Well, I helped him find and assemble "hot" parts and build a first-class bike from scratch. I was AMAZED. You could buy a wide varieties and prices of rims, sprockets, handlebars, seats, pedals... all very high tech, and very inexpensive and STANDARD!
Since that experience, I have been frustrated with cars. Why don't the manufacturers stamp out basic bodies and let the user choose standardized engines, exhaust, suspension, electronics, even seats? It wouldn't take as much standardization as you may think. There's already an infrastructure in place that has standardized oil, batteries, bolts, and nuts.
The car companies are just too big. If things were standardized, excellent little shops would pop up like mushrooms.

As long as it's public buildings, I'm fine with that. Why hire expensive architects and engineering firms to re-invent the wheel?
--
Bob

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I read somewhere that the o6 Sonata v-6 is a MB design and the Electronic Stability Control is Bosch...don't remember where now
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Dave in Lake Villa wrote:

It is very common for smaller car companies to purchase parts and technology from other manufacturers and vendors.
For example, American Motors at various times in its history used GM ignition, Ford carburetors, Ford ignition, GM steering columns, Ford starters, Borg Warner transmissions, Chrysler automatic transmissions, Motorola alternators, Saginaw (GM) power steering, New Process (Chrysler) 4WD transfer cases, and even GM engines in a few models; and this is in no way an exhaustive list. (The mix in my '75 Hornet is GM Delco alternator, GM Saginaw power steering, Bendix brakes, Ford starter, Chrysler automatic transmission, GM steering columns and Prestolite electronic ignition.)
It would not surprise me at all to find that much of the technology in Hyundai products is licensed or copied, that kind of thing is pretty much S.O.P. in the industry.
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snipped-for-privacy@techie.com wrote:

This is true for all companies now, not just the small ones. Few car makers these days make their own brakes, differentials, transmissions, etc. And a fair number of large companies collaborate on engines and even entire cars.
Personally, I think it is very wise for Hyundai to see out best-in-class components and use them. This will result in better performing and higher quality cars much more quickly than if they climb the learning curve themselves in all aspects of car manufacture.
Matt
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Yesterday I was alongside a car that looks like--"styled"-- most/many other cars.
Then I saw it was a Mercedes Benz, as its front & back are clearly brand/make specific.
It's not an unfair cliche to hold/think/perceive that Mercedes and Volvo(?) were copied/emulated by the Japanese, the Koreans and the Americans, is it?
The boxy-copy style/look seems to have flourished in the 1980s, or when (?), , and Mercedes (and Volvo?) had the design in earlier decades--the 1950s and maybe earlier.
Mercedes may have copied Packard or Rolls etal for all I know.
Bottomline observation: I suppose that everybody copies everybody in dynamic design, manufacturing and marketing process.
Occasionally there are patent & trademark publicized legal disputes, while legal phenomena/decisions do not necessarily explain what the reality of on-going plagasrism/ emulation is about.
Dave in Lake Villa wrote:

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