Throttle on a 2008 Elantra

Does my car have a "drive by wire' throttle or a cable arrangement?
---MIKE---

>> (44° 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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Does my car have a "drive by wire' throttle or a cable arrangement?
---MIKE---

>> (44° 15' N - Elevation 1580')
Probably, if it does not you'd see the linkage from the pedal leading to the firewall.
Most cars are going to that sort of setup as computers control so much now, to keep the engine running at top efficiency. IIRC, Airbus was the first to use a "fly by wire" system some years ago.
Something we should all do though, is mentally practice what to do if the throttle malfunctions. Toyota has had 2200 reported instances, 200+ accidents and 18 deaths. You shift into neutral and steer to the side of the road and stop. I'm sure most of the accidents are due to panic. Be sure other drivers in your house are aware of what to do.
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On 1/29/2010 11:54 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Ed - if you just shift into neutral won't you end up over revving? As I understand the problem it is a "sticky" throttle and it is my understanding that a car's brakes can overcome the power of the engine so my suggestion would be to apply the brakes forcefully, turn the ignition off, shift to neutral and then turn key back to on to allow steering (being aware that with the engine off braking and steering will require more effort) at which point you may pull out of traffic. Of course this is all easier said then done at the moment of increased throttle but the first thing is to step on the brake.
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jp103 wrote:

Virtually all modern engines have rev limiters so this isn't a big concern.
I believe the brakes will overcome most engines, but you would have to apply them very forcefully as once they become hot you could be in trouble.
It is much safer to do as Ed suggests and shift into neutral so that you maintain steering and power brakes and don't risk locking the steering when turning off the engine using the key.
Matt
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On 1/29/2010 7:06 PM, Voyager wrote:

I may have to try stopping while not taking my foot off the gas (right before I trade it in. And to think that they used to make cars without power brakes or steering. How did we ever manage???
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On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 19:19:40 -0500, jp103 wrote:

That was the easy part, the harder thing was starting using a crank handle and setting a choke.
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My original question was not answered. Does my car have a "fly by wire" throttle or not?
---MIKE---

>> (44° 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 20:14:04 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (---MIKE---) wrote:

Do you have a free account on HMAService.com? I lost my info last week in a computer crash and have not set it up yet. They will show a diagram of the throttle so you can see.
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Per HMA instructions: At some point, there is a cable. Try to follow it to the pedal. 1. Removal the engine cover(A). 2. Disconnect the throttle position sensor(TPS) and the idle speed actuator(ISA) connectors. 3. Disconnect the positive crankcase ventilation(PCV) hose and the breather hose. 4. Disconnect the accelerator cable.
Here is some info on the Throttle Position Sensor
The Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) is mounted on the throttle body and detects the opening angle of the throttle plate. The TPS has a variable resistor (potentiometer) whose characteristic is the resistance changing according to the throttle angle. During acceleration, the TPS resistance between the reference 5V and the signal terminal decreases and output voltage increases; during deceleration, the TPS resistance increases and TPS output voltage decreases. The ECM supplies a reference 5V to the TPS and the output voltage increases directly with the opening of the throttle valve. The TPS output voltage will vary from 0.2~0.8V at closed throttle to 4.3~4.8V at wide-open throttle. The ECM determines operating conditions such as idle (closed throttle), part load, acceleration/deceleration, and wide-open throttle from the TPS. Also The ECM uses the Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (MAPS) signal along with the TPS signal to adjust fuel injection duration and ignition timing.
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Irwell wrote:

The choke was the easy part, it was the spark advance that took talent!
Matt
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On 1/30/2010 09:29, Voyager wrote:

Yup, that was the hard part. I was gifted at getting it right, my Father no, so it cost me half an hour sleep every morning, my Father waked me early to start the farm tractor.
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I came along after the crank handle but I sure remember having to pull out the choke.

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jp103 wrote:

Check the fatality rates per mile driven back then compared to now and you will see how we managed. We managed by killing many more people per mile than today. :-)
Also, engines had a lot less power on average back then, speeds were generally lower and throttles were entirely mechanical so that in the rare event they stuck (and yes they did as I have had it happen), you could generally hook your toe under the accelerator and pull it back!
Also, people back then generally knew more about their vehicles (they had to too keep them running) and knew what to do with a stuck accelerator. I am still amazed at the family of the, as I recall, police officer who were killed in the one wreck because the man didn't have the intelligence to shift into neutral. Personally, I am not convinced that was an accident. I suspect he decided to take out himself and his family for some reason that we may never know.
Matt
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I've read that some manufacturers (Chrysler for one, IIRC) program a brake override in the computer. In case of signals from brake and accelerator, the brake wins. Toyota admits they do not. I wonder if Hyundai does. Anybody know for sure? HYUNDAITECH?????

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Partner wrote:

I had not heard that before about Chrysler, but it sure makes a lot of sense. As I have stated previously, I have always been impressed with Chrysler engineering, it is just their manufacturing that has long sucked.
This is similar to the difference in philosophy between Boeing and Airbus. Boeing has long designed their airplanes to allow the pilot full control, even to the point of stalling or overstressing the airplane. At least this was the case up to 10 or so years ago when I knew engineers at Boeing. It may not be the case anymore. Airbus on the other hand, chose the philosophy of having the computers limit the pilot's control authority so as to "protect" the airplane.
The trouble is, in some circumstances it is better to risk airframe failure or engine failure to avoid some other certain disaster.
Matt
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This was picked up from the Toyota News group:

This is good news!
---MIKE---

>> (44° 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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On Feb 6, 12:33 pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (---MIKE---) wrote:

I cannot confirm (nor deny) this.
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On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 16:11:39 -0500, jp103

I thought you were correct when I first heard about the problem, but the reports said that some drivers were unable to stop under power.
Most engines will not over rev because of limiters on them, but given the choice of a $3500 engine or crashing into a tree, you know the right choice.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I believe this was the first use and a number of military aircraft had fly-by-wire prior to Airbus.
http://disenchanted.com/dis/technology/fly-by-wire.html

I would just depress the clutch. :-)
Matt
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On Jan 29, 8:00 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (---MIKE---) wrote:

Cable from pedal to throttle body.
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