One for Mr Cheerful

I think, from your posts / expertise you are 'in the trade' and may even do MOTs.
I'm curious, how do the test the 'handbrake' on cars with electronic,
push button ones. Also, what about cars (like the Outlander PHEV) which don't even have that- just a P button and a 'Hold' button (this stops 'creep', when you select it the car won't creep forward etc after you've stopped at, say, traffic lights, unless you touch the acc. (No need to keep your foot on the brake like in an Auto.)
As I say, I'm just curious- my PHEV isn't due an MOT for sometime.
(I'm also curious re the way the 'drive system' will respond on the 'rollers' and how they will ensure the engine is 'warmed up' for the emission tests - they must have a method as some PHEVs must be old enough for MOTs. The emissions are very low, as I recall, around 40g/km, so perhaps there is a special method.)
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On 24/07/2018 14:02, Brian Reay wrote:

IIRC the Outlander is 4wd and is brake tested on the road with a decellerometer, the Park button still works as an emergency brake and is tested just the same, ie put it on and see if it slows the car enough. The emissions are still tested as per normal, the 40g per km is only at that level because of the use of battery power, the engine still knocks out the same amount of rubbish while running as any other modern engine. I don't know the outlander, but prius's will run if you press the accellerator with it in park, the latest test only tests at idle.
BTW I am not a tester, but I get about 50 plus tests a year done at the same place, and take a keen interest in testing matters.
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On 29/07/18 11:36, MrCheerful wrote:

Thank you.
The engine (petrol) on the Outlander will run if you select 'charge' but I think the battery needs to be a bit 'down'- it isn't something I normally do. I will check when I get a chance. There is also a 'Save' function (again, I've not really used it) which allows you to 'Save' the battery and run on engine but I think it only works if the battery is a bit depleted. Again, I will check.
You comments re the 40g make sense, it is a very low number! Even our Smart car is near just under 100g. T
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On 29/07/2018 16:54, Brian Reay wrote:

you can also push them into running by turning on everything electrical. Once warmed up, priuses stay that way for a long time by storing hot water in a thermos flask (I kid you not) so once there is circulation there is warm water shooting round. Probably the outlander is similar.
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On 29/07/2018 17:00, MrCheerful wrote:

I'll have an 'experiment' when I get a chance and report back.
I confess, I've not explored the detail of when the engine cuts in, beyond the obvious (battery depleted or 'foot hard down').
I've tried the charging via the engine a few times - more to see it working- but I don't use it normally.
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On 29/07/2018 21:35, Brian Reay wrote: [...]

These vehicles are known as "S-U-V". Probably easier on the tongue than just "U-V". But I don't get the "S" part?
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On 30/07/2018 07:30, johannes wrote:

Sport Utility Vehicle
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On 30/07/18 08:02, MrCheerful wrote:

But they aren't really 'sporty' in tg,erms of being 'fast' - even those like some of the Hondas labeled as the 'Sport' version aren't especially 'quick'- their mass is against them, even with a 2litre engine. (I'm far from a boy racer, by the way!).
Having said that, when you put your foot down in the PHEV and the engine cuts in in parallel with the 'normal' drive, the acceleration is surprising for a 1.7T vehicle. (One of the 'tricks'they get you to do on the test drive.)
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On 30/07/2018 10:16, Brian Reay wrote:

I thought the "sport" in SUV was as in hunting (US-style) and fishing.
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On 30/07/2018 10:43, Robin wrote:

And when do they get to do that? USA has very few public holidays and people that take time off for vacation are seen as slackers and the first to get laid off.
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On 30/07/2018 19:04, Peter Hill wrote:

All I know is that they managed 45 million people who went fishing at least once in 2015 and 15m with hunting licences. Then there's climbing, mountain biking, hiking, skiing, canoeing etc. And from my few trips to the States all seem to involve quite a few people getting off the paved roads to places where an SUV would help.
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On 30/07/2018 20:20, Robin wrote:

160m Working population.
7m unemployed (don't stop them having a pickup and a rifle). 8.3m part time (potential for long weekends). 10m unincorporated self employed (can't be laid off).
30m (includes 5m incorporated self employed) businesses in USA every one has a big boss that can take time anytime.
46m retired.
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On 30/07/18 07:30, johannes wrote:

While they are good on 4x4s for roads etc (in snow and the like), I'm not so sure I'd like to take it off road. Not so much because it couldn't cope- may be could- but it is really quite a 'smart' car, not a rugged butch vehicle. Likewise, when I think Utility, I don't think leather seats (heated), air con, gizmos to warm your nadgers (not really but you know what I mean. It is just a great car to drive, with a great driving position, and ideal for my road (which can be a pain to get out of in the snow).
(Cue Tim's theory's which ignore the other cars I / we've owned/own at the same time as SUV's).
The SUV label came, I believe, from the US to identify a new 'breed' of vehicles some years back- 'comfortable' 4x4s (or 4x4 look a likes in some cases) for everyday use.
I drove one of the US SUVs on a test track (off road) in the US in the mid 80s- before they were common here. It was more of an off-road vehicle- which is why we had access to it, the test track was part of a site of testing 'other' vehicles I was working on. It was far more of a 'beast' that most or the SUVs we see here, even the older Range Rovers, but not as raw as a Land Rover. It drove quite well but the not as well, in terms of 4x4 performance, as Land Rover. However, the later, at least to ones I've driven (army ones) are not really much fun as everyday cars.
I was very impressed by the Jeep Grand Cherokee we had as hire/rental car a couple of years back on a trip to the US- so much so we seriously considered one. We also looked at the Tesla 4x4 but the doors and the all electric put us off.
We had a CRV for about 11 years, it was excellent and now my son-in-law owns it.
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On 30/07/18 10:07, Brian Reay wrote:

I beleive it started as a way to get round the manufacturers' obligation to produce more fuel efficient vehicles. They were big enough to be classed as trucks and therefore did not count. So add car-like luxuries and sell them instead of cars.
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On 30/07/2018 20:15, DJC wrote:

There was that too :)
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All down to American taxation rules I believe. Utility vehicles attract a lower rate of tax than cars and “sportifying” them didn’t affect the taxation.
Tim
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In article

Think in some US states, it is based on either vehicle value or weight. With commercial vehicles exempt. Hence the popularity of the pickup truck. In the same way as Mini vans were used as cars in the UK purchase tax days.
But it was more to do with national fuel consumption. Makers had to meet an average for all their cars. But commercial vehicles were excluded.
All very logical. Swap your gas guzzling V8 car for an even thirstier V8 truck and you're saving the planet.
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On 31/07/18 15:31, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Not dissimilar to the advantageous VAT treatment of big pickup (at least 1 ton load capacity) here.

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Or the BIK advantage if you can have one as a company car.
Even though I work for an oil company, we have CO2 targets for the company fleet - meaning we can't take advantage of the crew-cab pickup loophole to get cheap BIK tax. Shame, as I really fancied a fully loaded Amarok Highline.
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On Mon, 30 Jul 2018 07:30:24 +0100

A friend in the US who had one always called it his Stupid Useless Vehicle.
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