Repairing a load liner

The load liner for my 406 estate has a couple of holes / cracks in it. I'd
like to seal them up, but whatever I use needs to be flexible as the thing
needs to bend to actually get in through the tailgate, and a few of the
cracks in it are from the bending. My first thoughts are PU sealant. Any
other ideas? Spray liner for a pickup truck bed maybe?
Reply to
Doki
Duck Tape on the underside then fill with silicone sealant?
Or duck tape bothsides?
Tony
Reply to
TMC
That's 'duct tape'. Duck tape is one of many brand names.
It was originally made to seal the joints on air conditioning ducts.
[Pedant alert: there's a story going round that it was first called duck tape by US soldiers in WWII because it was water repellent. But there's no contemporary written proof anybody can find of that one...]
Reply to
PCPaul
Why not. Quotes from *your* chosen reference:
"It?s possible to make a case that either is right."
"My view is that the original name was duct tape, given informally to it by heating engineers post-war, and that the duck tape version is elision in rapid speech, later capitalised on by a manufacturer. But, as things stand, nobody knows for sure."
"Duck tape is a trademark of Henkel Consumer Adhesives, dating from 1982, who sell it under that name in several countries. John Kahl, the CEO of the firm, was reported by Jan Freeman in the same article as saying that his father chose the name after noticing that duct tape sounded like duck tape when customers asked for it."
You'll need better proof than that, if you can find it.
Reply to
PCPaul
"It?s possible to make a case that either is right." So jumping into a thread to *pronounce* on the correct usage is something of an error, does it not?
Reply to
Ian Dalziel
I suggested this brand because they do have a virtually invisible type which may suit the repair better
I suppose you could instead use Duct tape at a push but this is considered a lower quality bulk use product
Gaffer tape would be a higher quality product and cloth tape the top end
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But I stick with my original suggestion
Tony
Reply to
TMC
Well, there's a choice. The well documented old name "duct tape" and the self-proclaimed tradename invented afterwards "duck tape" says it should be duct tape in the generic case.
Or the apocryphal unproven stories of WWII slang with no proof at all support the alternative usage.
I think the weight of evidence lies strongly with 'duct tape' as the generic case, although as other subthreads have said, the OP meant one of the specific Henkel branded variants on the theme.
Reply to
PCPaul
So despite quoting parts of the WWW article, you failed to read it?
The much earlier usage of "cotton duck", from which the tape was made?
The conclusion that "nobody knows"?
That is, nobody including PCPaul, I suspect.
What you are touting as written in stone amounts to little more than urban myth, in fact.
There is very little "weight of evidence".
And there's a fluffy little yellow duct on the label, these days...
Reply to
Ian Dalziel
P'raps. It's going to have to be taped and sealed I reckon - it needs to be moisture proof.
Reply to
Doki
Indeed they do. It's been sealing up the wonky sunroof on my Citroen Xantia since september, no leaks, no wind noise. Good stuff.
Mike P
Reply to
Mike P
In article , Duncan Wood says...
Take it to a place that makes curtains and sheets for HGV trailers. They have plenty of practice repairing slashes in curtains from pikey thieves who are too stupid to open the unlocked doors on the trailers.
Reply to
Conor
Hmm. "I think" does not equal "written in stone". There are two views, neither of which are proven, and *I think* one has noticeably more evidence for it than the other.
If you insist on seeing black and white when it's clearly grey, I wish you an interesting life.
Reply to
PCPaul
Sport, YOU are the one who decided to pronounce on the correct origin of the term.
"That's 'duct tape'. Duck tape is one of many brand names. It was originally made to seal the joints on air conditioning ducts."
Where did you say "I think" or "the balance of probability suggests"?
No one knows. Not even you. Therefore you were pronouncing out of the wrong orifice.
You were wrong - stop wriggling.
Reply to
Ian Dalziel

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