NMC - But I do own one! Battery/Starter Question

I recently put a new (rebuilt) starter and a new battery in my Chevy Suburban at the same time. The old battery had 775 CCA, the new has 875
CCA. The new starter seems to *really* crank over. Here's my question - Is the new battery pushing the starter harder (possibly decreasing its life expectancy) -OR- does the starter only pull the amps it needs, not more, so the extra 100 are sitting in reserve so to speak. I realize that the old worn-out starter had 120K+ on it, but the noise is considerably louder. It's not a grinding sound so I don't think it's a flywheel spacing issue, it just really seems like the starter is cranking really hard. Almost too quickly maybe?
Any thoughts? Thanks....
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On Fri, 30 Jan 2004 04:07:06 GMT, "Charlie Brandt"
wrote:

If you installed the correct 12 volt starter and you have a 12 volt battery, there shouldn't be a problem unless your old starter had some shims or a spacer between the bell housing and the starter and you lost that. More Cold Cranking Amps just means your battery can crank the engine over better in extreme cold weather. I live in cold country and I always buy the heaviest CCA battery that will fit. John
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The new battery will push the starter harder. But assuming everything's installed properly, not enough to cause any problems.
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