1983 Dodge van.

I saw an ad in the paper about a 1983 Dodge van I might be interested in.When did Dodge come out with fuel injection? cuhulin

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From 1988 through 1992, they were essentially throttle body fuel injected. Afterwards, they went to multiport fuel injection.
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So it is carburetor van? (1983 Dodge van) Good, I like that. I think I will call that phone number.
Last Tuesday, I patched that hole (JB Weld) in the timing chain case cover of my 1978 Dodge van, but there is another water leak.I think it might be the gasket or a hole in the timing chain case cover.I would have to remove the radiator and whatever else so I can see where the leak is and have enough room to work on it.
I like the idea of having two vehicles anyway in case one breaks down, I can drive the other one. cuhulin
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Yes, as far as I know, your 83 is probably a carburetor.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

OK, let me get this straight....
Your timing chain cover is leaking coolant or coolant is leaking onto the timing chain cover?
Some bolts that hold on some covers need RTV on their threads because they penetrate the water jacket. Could that be your problem, a bolt needs some glue basically?
Mike 86/00 CJ7 Laredo, 33x9.5 BFG Muds, 'glass nose to tail in '00 'New' frame in the works for '08. Some Canadian Bush Trip and Build Photos: http://mikeromainjeeptrips.shutterfly.com
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The other water/coolant leak leaks out of the top right hand area of the timing chain case cover of my 1978 Dodge van, 318 engine, the same area where the other leak was which I patched with JB Weld last Tuesday, a week ago.Like someone else posted before in another thread, there is a water gallery in part of the timing chain case cover, I assume that is correct.I have already cleaned (with acetone) one leak in the timing chain case cover.Yesterday morning, I was filling up the radiator with water, I saw water leaking out from somewhere behind the area I have already patched with JB Weld.I can't see exactly where the second leak is coming from.I am going to have to remove the grill and radiator and whatever else is in the way.Yes, I know about certain bolts need RTV (Permatex) on the threads.I have replaced a few water pumps before on various old vehicles I have owned.Sooner or later, I am going to buy another good old carburetor van.I reckon I dred working on my 1978 Dodge van water leaks, et al.I have gotten lazy over the years what with internet access and old movies on DirecTV. cuhulin
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

I don't. Those computer-controlled feedback carbs were an abomination. You could always replace it with a simple non-feedback Carter BBD and a non-computer electronic ignition (if emissions laws in your area allow it) but at the cost of a carb, distributor, electronic module, and your time hacking all the computer wiring and vacuum plumbing out of the way, the conversion would likely cost more than the van!
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I don't think it is that simple to simply replace a throttle body/fuel injection with a carburetor.As little (nothing) as I know about throttle body/fuel injection,,,,, I am not going to spend any time exploring that. cuhulin
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

No, its not that easy, and it would be a step backward. I was talking about replacing the POS computer-feedback CARBURETOR that you'd find on an 83 with a non-feedback Carter BBD and electronic ignition. That "downgrade" is frequently done because the feedback carbs are so problematic.
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I don't think it is that simple to replace a throttle body/fuel injection with a carburetor. I know little about throttle body/ fuel injection, so I won't spend any time exploring that. _________________________________________________
There's no need to replace it. If you're a carburetor guy, you'll like throttle body injection. It's just a carburetor with the guts removed, leaving only the outer body and the throttle butterflies.
And it's not really injection. It's a couple of fuel spraying nozzles mounted above the throttle butterflies. These nozzles don't get clogged because each one is big enough to feed four of the cylinders in a V8.
Fuel flow in a carburetor is controlled by vacuum venturis which suck the fuel from a reservoir, in an amount proportional to the velocity of the intake air flowing through the venturis.
Fuel flow in a TBI is controlled by a computer which varies the spray amount based on information from sensors (pressure, temperature, air velocity) connected to the computer.
I would rather have a TBI than individual cylinder injectors because it is less likely to clog, it has one-fourth of the number of solenoid valves to go bad, and no little plumbing lines with leaky o-ring seals.
I would rather have a TBI than a temperamental carburetor any day.
Good luck.
Rodan.
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I could easily build a computer, if I want to.Computerized thingys on/in vehicles scare me. I am going to phone the guy on Friday evening to see if he has the 1983 Dodge van for sale.My sister said she will take me over there on Saturday morning so I can check the van out.It isn't like everybody will be jumping up all at once to buy a twenty five years old van.It all depends on what kind of condition the van is in whether I will buy the van or not.Most of my driving years, I had always owned at least two vehicles in case one of them broke down.I like big old vans. cuhulin
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On Wed, 17 Sep 2008, Rodan wrote:

Me too... at least until something goes wrong with the electronics. When (not if) some sensor or module gets flaky or dies, and the codes don't say anything useful, and everyone I take it to (including the dealer, who should know how to fix it) says I'll just have to throw money at it until they happen across the problem, then a carb starts looking a lot more attractive. Not to mention, electronic engines have maybe a dozen or so different parts that can die and leave you sit with absolutely no warning, which tends to make the wife unhappy; carbs don't do that. Carbs aren't temperamental unless they're worn out, and even then they usually still work. They have to be rebuilt periodically to maintain efficiency, but a few hours of maintenance every few years is a small price to pay for the reliability.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Meh. I own and regularly drive both carbureted and EFI vehicles. As far as I'm concerned, they're completely interchangeable and equally reliable. Each has its advantages and quirks. Carbs require more tweaking, and they're never as dead-nuts accurate across the whole operating range. On the other hand, you can fix any problem a carb might have with a screwdriver and a pair of pliers, whereas fixing a failed high-pressure electric fuel pump is a replace-or-nothing operation that often requires dropping the tank (depending on the vehicle). I've never had a fuel injector fail in well over 500,00 miles divided among 4 MPFI cars and several TBI vehicles
For me one of the nicest things about EFI, especially OBD-II EFI, is that it can 'tell you where it hurts' when you plug in your scan tool.
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I love hearing that some old timer is 'scared' of TBI or MPFI. As I've said before in this group, there is none so dumb as he who will not learn. I grew up on carburetors and if I never see another one, it'll be too soon. Same goes for points/condensor ignition, drum brakes, tube tires, and hand crank starting. There's a guy across the street from me that has a 1972 Ford pickup and is proud that it 'don't have none of that electronic junk on it' as he puts it. His morning starting routine never takes less than 10 minutes, complete with multiple hood up and downs. I get in my Toyota pickup, turn the key, and drive away.
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Then he isn't doing what needs to be done. Something needs to be fixed. It should be get in, press the gas pedal to the floor, release, turn the key. Sure that extra step of setting the choke takes maybe an extra second or two but it's no big deal.
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I am going to phone that guy this afternoon and ask him if he still has the 1983 Dodge van for sale.If so, my sister said she will take me over there Saturday morning.So I can check out that van. cuhulin
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Back in the 1950s, my mom owned a 1952 six cylinder manual shift Ford car.On the coldest winter days, pull that manual choke out, that car never failed to start right up. cuhulin
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Brent P wrote:

If the choke's set right, you won't even notice its working either.
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The problem is that hardly anyone knows how to rebuild a carb these days. Working on those things is becoming a lost art, and consequently it is easier to get modern fuel injected systems kept in good condition.
It's a weird world, isn't it? --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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Cuhulin,
Get back to us as to what kind of condition this van is in. Rust, body damage, high milage, etc. But I doubt it will be worth 1.5K. The evolution of the carb/emissions systems is this, 1st, there were carburetors, 2nd, there were carbs that talked to and got orders from the computer, then there were, 3rd, throttle body fuel injection and today, 4th, port fuel injection.
From a maintinece, reliability stand point, #1 and #3 are the best. Followed closlly by #4. So guess what the biggest nightmare of the lot is, #2, The infamous computer controlled feedback carburetor.
Either get something older or newer. BTW what part of the country are you in?
disston
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