Interesting story about home automobile gasoline filling stations in residential property

On Mon, 5 Dec 2011 07:44:21 -0800 (PST), Harry K


Being 50 years older is one big reason. When I was 16 I could do a lot of things easer than I can at 66. I could even do some of them two or three times a day. :)
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

You mean two or three times a NIGHT, don't you? On the other hand, it now takes me all night to do what I used to do all night.
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Same here but she _really_ appreciates it!
Harry K
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I know what you mean. What my wife and I used to do for hours now takes us four hours.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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jeff_wisnia wrote:

Quite a change when the wife rolls over, exhausted, and goes to sleep.
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Sounds to me like you are ALREADY getting back at your neighbor, with all that fussing over gasoline going on next door to him.
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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On Fri, 02 Dec 2011 19:10:12 -0800, bob haller wrote:

Actually, as far as I can tell, gasoline doesn't spoil all 'that' fast.
I use up the entire 55 gallon drum in just a few weeks, depending on my driving of course. It generally takes less than two months to use it all up.
Even California blended corn-o-haul easily lasts two months from what I've seen in the literature. HOWEVER (and this is a big but) ... EVERYONE says gas doesn't last long but NOBODY actually has a length of time specified that anyone else will agree to.
Hearing people say gas doesn't last is about as useful as hearing people say life isn't what it used to be. It's meaningless the way it's used.
NOBODY but nobody can tell me how LONG gasoline REALLY lasts but EVERYONE I talk to says two months is just fine. I even called Chevron and they said there is no problem using their reformulated California gas months after it was dispensed. They said WATER is the main culprit in gasoline going bad - and they said that as long as you keep water out of the tank, it should easily last the time I'm using it. They said heat also matters, but, at outside temperatures, it doesn't matter as much as water does.
So, if anyone can find an actual TIME that others will agree to that gasoline lasts in outside storage - I'd be the first one to listen to them - but two months seems, by all accounts, to be well within the agreed-upon stable storage period.
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On 12/3/2011 3:29 AM, worker bee wrote:

I might understand if you were buying when prices are low and using it when prices are high. The whole thing sounds like way too much of a hassle, more of a hassle than taking the car to the gas station.
Speaking of buying low, I paid $2.99/gallon earlier this week.
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l
My only method of beating the system is to keep all tanks full as prices are rising and as near empty as practical when they are dropping = dollar cost averaging.
I could beat the system somewhat if I could haul a decent size tank across the state line. Big difference in fuel taxes over there.
Harry K
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On Sat, 03 Dec 2011 08:33:07 -0800, Harry K wrote:

I'm in California so the state lines are hundreds of miles away - but I could see this system working if you lived in, say, New York or Pennsylvania, and all you had to do was cross state lines to get cheap gas.
I suspect the toll bridges might have special regulations though but there are plenty of non-bridge crossings which could save you a ton.
When we were kids, we used to do that with liquor, taking advantages of the differences in state laws. (Uuugh, don't remind me of those days!) :)
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Transporting more than a few bottles of liquor across state lines which can only be used as gifts is utterly illegal... Alcohol and tobacco products are required to have state tax stamps on them which prove that they were lawfully obtained and had the taxes paid on them... States require that you have a proper license and permit to be able to sell either of those items...
Transporting either of those commodities across a state line in quantities of more than a gallon of hard liquor is a serious federal offense...
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On Sat, 03 Dec 2011 10:00:41 -0500, Tony Miklos wrote:

I actually did the opposite recently when the prices were hovering around $4.30 a gallon.
At those prices, I stopped refilling the gas cans and just refilled the cars as the prices steadily dropped.
When they got down to about $3.90, I started filling the gas cans again.
With my 1,500 gallons of propane, I can easily fill up in August (typically the low of the year) which lasts me through most of the winter at least. So I know what you mean about buying in volume to take advantage of the cheaper prices.
If 'our' California special gasoline ever got anywhere near 3 bucks a gallon, I'd run out and buy a hundred five gallon cans! :)
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worker bee wrote:

The story just keeps getting better...
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I've had neighbors just like this.... --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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I presume you were forced to call code enforcement many times?

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No, it was in Atlanta. It was easier for me to move away. After they had sprayed their lawn (and mine) with a "diluted" defoliant to "make mowing easier." --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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I don't know how long you can get away with, but I know that I can store gas for the mower in September and it's marginal but usable in March. So I would guess that is about the limit without adding a stabilizer. --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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On Sat, 03 Dec 2011 10:05:17 -0500, Scott Dorsey wrote:

stabilizer.
I use up all the Chevron in the drum in about six weeks (give or take a few weeks either way).
This long-term-gas-storage Chevron web site says California reformulated mandated gasoline lasts as long as any other gas, even with the corn in it soaking up all that water. http://www.chevron.com/products/prodserv/fuels/technical_safety_bulletins/ ltg_storage.aspx
They simply suggest you keep the fuel drum out of the direct sun (mine is in a loosely covered shed) and to keep the 55 gallon drum as full as you can to avoid moisture.
Two months is the absolute maximum my gas would stay unused, if that long, so shelf life just isn't all that big of a problem for me.
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clipped

Calling code enforcement is a good way to start a neighbor war...gotta be careful where it goes. I called code once when condo neighbors all had gasoline cans sitting outside their doors for boats...some never used their boats, so the gas was probably years old. We had already had minor thefts and vandalism, so didn't want the vandal critters to be inspired by having gasoline at hand. One neighbor was gone a lot, so his son took one of his gas cans and put it inside the condo! The FD enforced .. very nicely .. using the right kind of can, away from the structure. The gas cans were stored outside front doors after I called code enf. to get rid of recycling bins (full of trash) outside front doors. The recycling bins, prior to my arrival at the condo, replaced open trash cans that were the dining area for rats. They changed from open trash cans to (free) dumpster, which helped. Another neighbor had called code enf. about attic rats - there had been very heavy infestation - and the code guy found only "dust balls in the AC duct"; had he checked the attic, he's have found lots of rat sign. After one elderly neighbor passed away, I helped organize the estate sale in his condo unit..great big rat trap on his closet shelf. These are not poor folks we're talking about...
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On Sat, 03 Dec 2011 07:32:03 -0500, Norminn wrote:

I understand. Out here, everyone does 'something' against code.
For example, you're not supposed to grade more than a certain number of cubic yards of soil - but of course, nobody can even see you with a bulldozer, so people grade all the time.
Every once in a while a neighbor complains and they put a stop to it and stop them from touching the land for a certain number of years.
Likewise with cutting trees. Every single tree over a given diameter is a protected tree. You're supposed to apply for a permit to cut, even diseased or fallen trees (although the permit will be granted for sure for those).
If a neighbor complains, the inspector will come out and cite you for cutting down your own tree!
Similarly, there are quite a few 'unapproved auxiliary buildings' out here that have electricity or which are greater than 120 square feet. These buildings just go up without anyone but your one or two neighbors noticing the hammering and sawing noises. Since it's a scenic zoned area, you have to be away from the road by quite a distance (I don't remember how many hundreds of feet but someone once told me what it was and I was shocked at how far from the road it must be to be legal.)
Most of these well-lit too-close-to-the-road illegal sheds are completely ignored - but if someone calls the inspector out on you, you have to take it down.
There's even a guy whose pool layed unfinished for five years which I was told by a neighbor was because he tried to build it without getting it inspected.
Even the lines to 'my' built-in gas-fired barbeque I was told wasn't to code when the propane guy first inspected the house to fill up my new 1,000 gallon tank that I added after putting in a concrete pad. Apparently the previous owner put in a rather large pool shower & equipment room and barbeque pad without getting permitted and nobody complained yet. :)

Wow. I didn't know rats were a code violation. I have those big rat traps all over the basement! I get a rat a week on average and keep a jar of peanut butter in the garage just to bait the traps.
We do have vector control guys out here. There are three types.
One does mosquitoes. One does rodents & snakes. The third does bigger stuff like the mountain lions and deer and coyotes.
When the neighbor was foreclosed on, he put mosquitoe fish in their green pool and koi pond to eat the buggers and put up a big sign "DO NOT REMOVE THESE FISH" right next to the pool - so either the vector control helicoptor noticed the green pool or someone must have asked them to look at the pool.
As for the rodent inspector, I guess he would be the one to suggest there are rats, but, there are quite a few mice, moles or groundhogs (I never can tell which they are), rabbits, and rats out here that I wonder what you can possibly do that's illegal to attract them. Our garbage goes out weekly in three very large bins - blue for recycling, green for landscaping, & gray for trash (which is almost always empty as I can't imagine what goes in that bin other than food-soiled items not worth cleaning for reclying and not worth putting in the compost pile).
Likewise for the mountain lion guy. There's not really much he can do except tell you to fence your lifestock with a tall fence that has an overhang to protect the top. But I don't have livestock so I don't know what reason someone would call code enforcement on me for that. Out here, you can't shoot a mountain lion unless it's threatening you or your property anyway. We actually see them probably once every few years but we hear about them in the news about once every few months overall.
So, I guess I'm wholeheartedly agreeing with you.
We live in glass houses. There must be a code violation or two on almost every property out here, especially since I don't even KNOW all the codes (for example, I can't imagine what rat codes I might be violating just by setting the numerous traps).
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