93 Camry oil cooler

A friend of mine bought a 93 Camry 4 cyl and was told that the oil cooler installed was an optional item for that car. Anyway, a mechanic bypassed it
due to oil in the radiator and he hasn't had any problems since. Has anyone ever heard of this? If it is an optional item, when would you want it? (Pulling a trailer?) TIA Bill
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Im not sure about that model, but transmission coolers are normal in a radiator , I dought it is optional as its internal and should not be disconected unless you live in the artic , heat kills transmissions fast and the radiator should be replaced. also if you live in a hot area an additional cooler can save your trans from early failure. If there was oil in the water than there is probably water in the trans also . Everything , motor and trans should be flushed. And If im right a new mechanic found. My 91 has the cooler standard in the radiator. and I plan in adding an aditional unit as I have done on other cars. The problem is cars dont come with trans temp guages, and if you drive hard or tow , they realy are a necessity to avoid early failure. Ive screwed 2 toyota transmissions already from heat.
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I've replaced radiators in both a ' 90 and a '96 Camry and both had Transmission radiators within the main radiator. No oil coolers. That would most likely be an extra exterior radiator. You must have the transmission radiator connected! A new radiator is about $150 plus installation (labor). I leave it to your imagination as to what a new transmission will cost. You need to immediately ascertain whether your "mechanic" connected the transmission cooling lines. They're little 1/4" hoses at the bottom of the radiator that go from the bottom of the radiator to the transmission assembly. If he simply plugged the radiator ends and hooked the transmission lines together( ! ) he's warming up the tow truck for you right now. Oil in the radiator fluid is coming from the engine as others have noted. What worries us all is the "bypass" bit and "oil in the radiator". You need a second on-site opinion.
Ed
ROBMURR wrote:

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The only oil cooler on the Generation 3, four cylinder Camry is directly beneath the oil filter - between the filter base and the engine block. I've heard occasion of them leaking, where a new gasket could be required. Although there are the "bypass" water lines running through the oil cooler, never heard of oil leaking into the coolant from there. I do not believe these oil coolers were optional, but installed on all. If the Toyota engineers felt it wise to include one, I wouldn't be removing it. If it actually were leaking - should be replaced with factory part.
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Here is a picture of the oil cooler FWIW.
http://tinyurl.com/lzwu

cooler
it
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Platil wrote:

This is a "heat exchanger"... not a "cooler".
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Lots of good info, but no one has answered my question. Are/were they optional and if so, why? Bill

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Bill & Lynda wrote:

No, its standard on certain models.
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I have seen those heat exchangers on a few Camrys ... when I happened to notice them. Being in the southwestern US (desert) might have something to do with it. Then again, since it is a "heat exchanger," there is also a benefit in unusually cold climates to warm the oil quicker.
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This is not a transmission cooler. It is bolted on the front of the engine and looks like an oil filter. Oil runs thru it while water circulates around it to cool the oil. I guess the internal walls rusted out. That caused approx 45lbs of oil pressure at startup applied to a radiator designed to operate at 9-10 lbs pressure. Of course it blew the radiator when it went. Bill
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Bill & Lynda wrote:

Coolant doesnt allow rust, unless its been severely neglected (never changed) and then corrosion starts in. I'm sure the radiator (plastic tanks) were all corroded from the inside anyway.
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MDT Tech wrote:

Corroded plastic? ;-)
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Philip wrote:

Yes, the top tank will deteriorate from the inside, it becomes brittle also and will split open with normal pressure. The coolant becomes corrosive. Radiator hoses degrade from the inside also.
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Bill & Lynda wrote:

I have seen these welded sheet metal "heat exchangers." The "adaptor" serves to equalize oil temperature to engine coolant temperature, not just cool the oil.
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