Question for the experts.... Check Engine Light and more...

98 Taco SR5 5VZ-FE 4x4 w/ 205k is giving me a weird problem of sorts...
I know that if you disconnect the speedo sensor on the tranny, you get
a check engine light but only your speedo/odo don't work... My problem is that, out of the blue, the tach, speedo AND the odo stopped working, then threw the Check Engine Light...
Does anyone know without hooking up to a diag machine what that might be?
No recent repairs, fuses have been checked, fusable links too... All wiring intact, can't figure out what the deal is.
I had went thru and wiggled the harness at the tranny, then it worked for a day. Is there a sensor there that could have went belly up??
Thanks, and I appreciate your opinions.
RedForeman
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I guess there aren't any 'experts'....
how 'bout anyone with an opinion?
I'm open to anything, just curious what people thought...
thanks anyway...
RedForeman wrote:

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| I guess there aren't any 'experts'.... | | how 'bout anyone with an opinion? | | I'm open to anything, just curious what people thought... | | thanks anyway... | | | RedForeman wrote: | > 98 Taco SR5 5VZ-FE 4x4 w/ 205k is giving me a weird problem of sorts... | > | > I know that if you disconnect the speedo sensor on the tranny, you get | > a check engine light but only your speedo/odo don't work... My problem | > is that, out of the blue, the tach, speedo AND the odo stopped working, | > then threw the Check Engine Light... | > | > Does anyone know without hooking up to a diag machine what that might | > be? | > | > No recent repairs, fuses have been checked, fusable links too... All | > wiring intact, can't figure out what the deal is. | > | > I had went thru and wiggled the harness at the tranny, then it worked | > for a day. Is there a sensor there that could have went belly up?? | > | > Thanks, and I appreciate your opinions. | > | > RedForeman |
I will find the manuals for my 1999 Tacoma tomorrow and see what it says about it. There has to be a sender of some sort, either optical or magnetic at the tranny.
--
Jarhead



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Exactly what I was thinking... my opinion is that maybe the speed sensor or where the speedo plugs into, there could be a 'sensor' there and maybe that is what's went bad... In the haynes manual I have, it's just called 'speedo cable' but it's an electrical connection, but does not mention what it plugs into at the tranny...
Thanks
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| | > I will find the manuals for my 1999 Tacoma tomorrow and see what it says | > about it. There has to be a sender of some sort, either optical or | > magnetic at the tranny. | > | > -- | > Jarhead | | Exactly what I was thinking... my opinion is that maybe the speed | sensor or where the speedo plugs into, there could be a 'sensor' there | and maybe that is what's went bad... In the haynes manual I have, it's | just called 'speedo cable' but it's an electrical connection, but does | not mention what it plugs into at the tranny... | | Thanks
Got busy this morning and couldn't get to it until now.
My Toyota manual says to connect the positive lead from the battery to pin 1 of the speed sensor and the negative lead to pin 2. Connect the positive lead of a voltmeter to pin 3 and the negative to pin 2. Rotate the shaft of the speed sensor. The voltage should vary between approx. 0 volts to 11 volts (or more) 4 times per each revolution of the shaft. If either condition is not met, replace the speed sensor.
Hope this helps-
--
Jarhead



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| | > I will find the manuals for my 1999 Tacoma tomorrow and see what it says | > about it. There has to be a sender of some sort, either optical or | > magnetic at the tranny. | > | > -- | > Jarhead | | Exactly what I was thinking... my opinion is that maybe the speed | sensor or where the speedo plugs into, there could be a 'sensor' there | and maybe that is what's went bad... In the haynes manual I have, it's | just called 'speedo cable' but it's an electrical connection, but does | not mention what it plugs into at the tranny... | | Thanks
Got busy this morning and couldn't get to it until now.
My Toyota manual says to connect the positive lead from the battery to pin 1 of the speed sensor and the negative lead to pin 2. Connect the positive lead of a voltmeter to pin 3 and the negative to pin 2. Rotate the shaft of the speed sensor. The voltage should vary between approx. 0 volts to 11 volts (or more) 4 times per each revolution of the shaft. If either condition is not met, replace the speed sensor.
Hope this helps-
--
Jarhead




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Man do I appreciate you getting me details like that...
Many huge and sincere thanks...
Have a great day,
RedForeman
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Connecting it to a diagnostic machine is as easy as a trip to AutoZone, where the counter person there will pull the codes free of charge and reset the computer so the light goes off. In California, AutoZone will give you the machine and you can pull the codes yourself. It's easy, really.
The check light is able to tell you what the connection is between the stuff that doesn't work, and the light coming on. Without the code, it is impossible to say what the trouble is.
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Jeff Strickland wrote:

Not from where I'm from, there's not an auto-zone, napa, advanced, or an oreiley's that has a free diagnostics machine, with free hook ups... Come on... if they did, don't you think every JimBob and Bubba in a 10 mile radius would line up?? I don't think so...

Hmm... ya don't say... Um yeah, I'm pretty sure I 'know' what a check engine light indicates, about a problem an all... I got that much... but thanks for the insight...
Have a great day....
RedForeman
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RedForeman wrote:

I think that's the idea. The more JimBobs and Bubbas lined up, the more sales they'll get.
Dan
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Bubba hasn't figured out yet that its probably not worth his time to screw with it and to take it to the shop.
The shop I take my tundra to has all the tools and training to take care of my truck. They do it in a fraction of the time that I could, and their labor cost is only $50/hr. Every billable hour that my truck is off the road costs me $100/hr in labor plus the margins on any parts sold and installed. Because the shop I take my truck to knows that its how I make my living, they are real good about getting me in and out. For me its a no-brainer to take it to the shop. Same with wash/wax/detail... they do in an hour what would take me all day.... and the best part is that its all written off as a business expense.
--

Steve @ Noon-Air Heating & A/C
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net
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For YOU, it's a no-brainer. But there are lots of guys that prefer to save labor dollars on stuff they are able and willing to do themselves. Pulling codes is VERY easy, and diagnosing those codes is usually very straight forward -- despite what you might gleem from the discussions Ray and I have.
Some of us know that a problem reported by the Check Engine light can be repaired at home, and some things can not. And, some people have a different tolerance for what they can do at home than others might have. But, any repair that needs to be done begins with knowing what the code is, because that is what the computer thinks is wrong. If the computer aint happy, aint nobody happy.
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I don't take my truck to the shop unless it's more than I can handle, and so far, I can handle just about anything, except electrical... Usually these things are a bit more 'obvious' but since I've seen a similar instance, I thought it might be a good idea to ask some other toyonuts if they'd seen it before...
and btw, they don't loan scanners out around here...
RedForeman
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wrote:

Actually, an auto parts store that reads these codes for free would benefit from the line out the door. Once the problem is diagnosed and it turns out to be a part that needs to be replaced the person using the free diagnostic tool will feel obligated to buy this part from the store offering the free diagnosis. At least I certainly would. ERS
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The idea is that if you know what the problem is with the car, you'll buy stuff from the parts store that could tell you what is wrong. Seems like a good strategy to me.
Lots of auto parts stores have a Loaner Tool Program, the Scan Tool is typically included. I'd suggest you ask the parts houses in your area if they loan tools -- typically these are the specialty tools, like spring compressors, that one only needs once every 5 years or so.
If there is no Loaner Tool Program, you can buy a scan tool for something like $65.

Dude, the Check Light might be telling you why the other stuff isn't working. Or, it might simply be telling you that the other stuff is a Needed Input for the computer, and since it isn't there, the computer turns the Check Light on.
Have a nice day ...
And, get the code and ask us again.
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PS There are now 3 people giving you the marketing strategy behind the parts store letting you pull codes, or them pulling the codes for you.
When you know the code, you have the power to fix the problem. They are banking on you buying the repair parts from them.
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wrote:

No, that's an incomplete statement. They are banking on you buying the repair parts from them, *AND* they're not /at all/ concerned whether you test to see if that part is really bad, or the real problem.
Though they'll never admit it in public, they actually prefer that you "Shotgun" the repair by throwing a lot of new parts at the car - they'll be more than happy to provide you with the long list of parts that could throw that code, and of course they sell those parts, too.
"Hey, one of the Vacuum Switching Valves shows bad, here's a new one in the box." They really don't want you to get out a multimeter, Mityvac hand pump and a repair book to test whether it's really that valve causing the problem, or somewhere else in the circuit like a pinched hose or a failed vacuum check valve.
"Hey, the Idle Air Control Valve is bad, here's a new one." Doesn't matter that it is often clogged passages in the throttle body to and from the valve, or just dirt buildup inside the IAC valve that you can fairly easily clean out. If the IAC didn't do it, they'll sell you a rebuilt throttle body next.
Keep throwing parts at the car long enough and eventually you'll find the right one and fix the problem - but you've also enriched the parts store's monthly gross sales volume considerably.
--<< Bruce >>--
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Bruce L. Bergman wrote:

Of course they want customers to spend money at their store. Duh. Whether or not the consumer knows what they're doing is not the business of the auto parts store. In my experience, often they will try to educate the customer which will boost their customer service rating which will keep the customer coming back.
Using your statement as an excuse to not use auto parts stores is merely for the benefit of making YOU feel better that you do not have the capability to do minor troubleshooting. For those of us that can, auto parts stores are great.
Dante
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Ahh, but you made an assumption and tossed me into the wrong category, my good man! ;-) With the repair manual, I'll grab my tools and run down the fault tree to see what the problem really is, not just start shotgunning.
It was meant as a warning to those who think "pulling the codes" is the end-all move that leads to instant answers - it isn't. All the code does is start you off in the right direction.
--<< Bruce >>--
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