Recommended tire pressure for '00 Passat Wagon 1.8T?

The previous owner managed to somehow get the inside of the fuel filler cap smeared with white paint (not visible from the outside) so I cannot
read the recommended tire pressures. Low marks to VW for not also including this info in the Owner's Manual (it just says check fuel filler cap). I've searched on the net and could not find anything (other than "it's on the fuel filler cap").
I realize they may be somewhat different for a V6 Wagon since it's a few hundred lbs heavier, but it would give me a good starting point if no one here has a 1.8T Wagon. I've heard people mention 41/35, that seems a bit high to me and I also don't know if that's front/rear or vice versa (and if it's for Wagons).
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Duke Ionescu wrote:

I am prety sure VWoA will answer you from their website if you ask, or call your service department.
At any rate, I typically drive with ~36 all around (V6 4Motion). You may want the front a bit higher than the back under normal circumstances (e.g., 34/32; back higher when fully loaded, e.g., 35/37). I find anything uder 33 soft, squirmy and using substantially more fuel. Above 36 will gain little in terms of handling and fuel conservation, but will start to feel a bit hard with most tires. Your personal preferences may be different.
- D.
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thats for a max full load and or high speed driving continuosly(auotbahn)?according to my wifes 2000 V-6 w/tip passat wagons fuel filler door(black magic metallic) color in and out ,the std.psi is appx.30 FRONT 29 REAR, we run them appx. 31 in F/ 30 R
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RLGIRSCH said the following on 10/30/2003 8:21 PM:

Thanks guys. I actually took a few paper towels with some 409 surface cleaner and managed to scrape most of the pain off to read the label. It's just as RLGIRSCH said, 32/31 under full load and 30/29 normal for the stock tires (165/45 R15 I believe). The pressures were all messed up, 32/36 L/R front and 32/14 L/R rear! Good thing I checked.
That said, I park in a motorgate garage that has about 6 floors and I have to drive all the way to the top. The tires squeal when I take left or right turns, even at relatively slow speeds (I'd say less than 9MPH), although since inflating them to 31/30 it seems to have decreased a bit. Will putting slightly more pressure, say 33/32, help? And does it have a noticeable impact on mileage?
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Duke Ionescu wrote:

When you ask 10 people about tire pressure, you get 20 different opinions, but I would say:
- manufacturer specs are just guidelines, compromises between a comfortable ride and safety, fuel economy, and tire wear - even manufacturers' values have quite a range depending on load - remember that your pressure will always be lower between the times you check and refill, by gowing a bit higher, you will be closer to your target on average - going lower than spec will decrease mileage and will eventually become a safety issue - you can in principle go as high as max pressure on sidewall (cold); depending on manufacturer, that can be as high as 40-45psi - going above 33 to 36 somewhere you will notice the ride to become a lot stiffer, perhaps becoming uncomfortable for you (personal taste) - as I said before, I don't notice any more fuel savings if I go above 36, and also little improvement in handling (I don't drive track) - I do see a difference in fuel consumption going from 36 down to 33, and also in handling (*) - my tires wear out pretty flat at 36, but much more on the edges at 33 or lower - below 33 I find the car starts to drive like a Toyota :0
Some squeeling is normal in (many) parking garages, because of their polished surface. I am pretty sure you don't have 165/45 R15 tires (your car would look like a go-cart). I think 195/65 R15 is normal for the base models, and 205/55 R16 for the more expensive ones.
- D.
(*) Again, this is for the V6 4Motion Wagon.
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TransFixed said the following on 10/31/2003 2:33 PM:

Good point, but hearing and thinking about the 20 different opinions may help one arrive to their own, albeit different, opinion ;)

got it

probably wouldn't bother _me_

I assume you mean more consumption.

hmm, isn't this a sign of over-inflation? I'd think you'd want the edges to make more contact, especially when cornering, for better grip.

I will try 34/34 and see how I like it. Your V6 is heavier than my 1.8T, and I don't have 4wd. Any big difference bet. using same pressures F/R and following VW's rec of R=F-1? I know the engine is upfront, but why do they think it's a good idea to have the back slightly less inflated?

Yes. And I've actually looked at the speedo today (when I posted last night I could only remember tach values since it's what I watch most) and the speed is actually around 15 MPH, not <9MPH - so I guess it's normal. Inflating according to spec definitely improved handling in corners, I'm curious to see how tangible of a difference going to 34/34 (or 35/34?) will make.

LOL, you got it - they're 195/65 R15.
My second to last car previous to the Passat was a 97 Maxima SE and I believe it too had 205/55 R16 tires stock. I remember quite clearly that the recommended pressures were 31/31. Of course, it's a diff. car w/ diff. tires. It's just that for some reason I assumed that going above 31 or 32 wasn't really recommended for everyday driving under normal load - so this is all news to me.
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Duke Ionescu wrote: ...

Yes, the lower the tire pressure, the more friction and the more fuel consumption (and tire wear).

Low pressure let's the tires roll over in curves, and makes the center bulge up. High pressure will push the center down, making for a flatter contact with the ground. It will also keep your tires from overly deforming in curves - less wear at the edges. Over-inflation will cause excessive wear in the center, only.
Good luck with your "experiments"! Keep us informed about your fuel consumption, if you can.
- D.
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Remember to check and adjust the tire pressure cold, not after the tire has gotten warm from driving.

Often, 35psi, 44psi, or 51psi is the tire maximum pressure. When buying replacement tires, be sure that the tire's pressure limit is at least as high as the pressure recommended for the car (and also check the load and speed ratings).
--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Timothy J. Lee
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also dont forget for every 10 F drop in temp. you lose 1 PSI per degree!!!!!!!!!
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sorry......................... one psi drop/rise per 10 degrees f of temp and visa versa
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Timothy J. Lee said the following on 11/3/2003 2:30 PM:

Yep - although sometimes 2 wheels will have been sitting in the sun, the other two in the shade. But I don't think half a psi really makes that big of a difference. As long as you check regularly and don't observe and abnormal ride conditions and/or tread wear.
RLGIRSCH said the following on 11/3/2003 3:29 PM: > also dont forget for every 10 F drop in temp. you lose 1 PSI per > degree!!!!!!!!!
Do you mean that you lose 1 psi for every 10F drop in temperature? Makes sense.
I've been running 34 psi all around for a few days now and the ride seems a little better. Too soon to tell about gas mileage.
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Much of the excellent advice given by Mr Lee and other posters about setting your tire pressures is summarized here at TireRack.com. I am not an employee of this company or associated with them in any way - I am not even a customer, in fact!
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/general/pressure.htm

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4Motion wrote:

A very simple trick not mentioned there but often stated in newsgroups like this one is to slightly overinflate your tires at a gas station close to home on your way home. Then, later in the evening or the next morning, you adjust to the dessired pressure by letting some air out. That way, you don't need a compressor at home to get good cold settings.
- D.
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A floor pump like one would use to pump up bicycle tires will work also, if it can be attached to a schaeder valve. On a car tire, figure about 10 strokes per psi (varies depending on the size of the tire, of course).
Don't forget to check your spare tire's air pressure.
--
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Timothy J. Lee
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wal-mart has a compessed air tank for under 20.00$,.....ive had one before there was even a wal-mart.w/ a multi-vech family ,motorcycles, bikes3-4 cars ,etc.,.it just a little easier and accurate all at the same time.just fill it once at the air pump and bring it to the vechicles instead of the other way around!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!will hold 90-120 psi untill used up,.many fills from that baby
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