IFS Conversion kit

I recently installed a 6' lift kit on my 98 GMC Z71 and am now wondering if I should just cut my losses and go to an ORU conversion kit and install a
solid front axle. I don't seem to be able to find any info on making the independant front suspension any stronger.
Any input on this would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Blair
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I did the same thing. I put a 6" kit on my 96 Yukon, and I'm not happy with the soft suspension now. It dips too much, feels less than confident in corners, and while off-roading my 35" tires have come in contact with the body many times at the very back of the wheel moulding.
There's only a couple of options: 1) If you want to keep the IFS front end, get stronger torsion bars and run a multiple shock system in the front end. It will still go out of alignment, and there are no lockers available for the 8.25" differential in the front end - assuming you have a 1/2 ton truck 2) Go with a straight axle swap (SAS) and get rid of the IFS altogether. A straight front axle is much stronger, has more articulation, and many options for locking differentials
I'm taking the SAS route - already bought a pair of dana 60's from a 79 Ford, and I'm going to get the bracket kit from ORU. What hurts is that I already spent so much $$ to get it where it is now (suspension kit, new gearing, locker for the 10 bolt rear end, and new rims and tires). I'm into the truck for $6k to get the IFS lifted, and won't use any of the parts when I convert to a straight front axle.
I bought a Dana 44 out of a 79 Ford and was planning to swap knuckles with a GM 10 bolt front end to keep my 6 bolt pattern wheels and the 10 bolt rear end and locker that I have now, but after research I'm not taking that route because I don't want to waste any more money than I already have. The 10 bolt rear end is very weak, so I'm going to replace that as well.
I'm gonna spend the $$ doing it right this time. I was planning a 14 bolt rear end and a Dana 60 front, but I got a good deal on a pair (front and rear) of Dana 60's to start with. They are very rough, and need virtually everything replaced. So far I have bought just the incidentals to rebuild them (seals/bearings/nuts/shims/gaskets/etc) for about $600. Now I've gotta get different gears, different carriers (probably get lockers instead), leaf springs, rims, tires, drive shafts modified, cross over steering hardware, and all brake hardware, including calipers, disks, hoses, and brackets for the rear disks. That's not to mention the work I'll need to do to weld/install all this stuff. I'll be into the truck for another $6k at least by the time I'm done with this SAS conversion, but hopefully I'll be able to sell a few of my old upgrade parts to recoupe a little of it.
Kinda sad that I wasted a bunch of cash on that IFS front end to begin with, but my cup is still half full. When I'm done my truck will be MUCH stronger and ready for anything I wanna do with it. I also consider that I don't have a truck payment anymore, and if I bought a new truck I would be spending this money anyway.... :-)
So my opinion is IFS is great for a stock truck. If you modify it, it gets weak and will leave you dissapointed, both on and off the road.
SuperDave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I did the same thing. I put a 6" kit on my 96 Yukon, and I'm not happy with the soft suspension now. It dips too much, feels less than confident in corners, and while off-roading my 35" tires have come in contact with the body many times at the very back of the wheel moulding.
There's only a couple of options: 1) If you want to keep the IFS front end, get stronger torsion bars and run a multiple shock system in the front end. It will still go out of alignment, and there are no lockers available for the 8.25" differential in the front end - assuming you have a 1/2 ton truck 2) Go with a straight axle swap (SAS) and get rid of the IFS altogether. A straight front axle is much stronger, has more articulation, and many options for locking differentials
I'm taking the SAS route - already bought a pair of dana 60's from a 79 Ford, and I'm going to get the bracket kit from ORU. What hurts is that I already spent so much $$ to get it where it is now (suspension kit, new gearing, locker for the 10 bolt rear end, and new rims and tires). I'm into the truck for $6k to get the IFS lifted, and won't use any of the parts when I convert to a straight front axle.
I bought a Dana 44 out of a 79 Ford and was planning to swap knuckles with a GM 10 bolt front end to keep my 6 bolt pattern wheels and the 10 bolt rear end and locker that I have now, but after research I'm not taking that route because I don't want to waste any more money than I already have. The 10 bolt rear end is very weak, so I'm going to replace that as well.
I'm gonna spend the $$ doing it right this time. I was planning a 14 bolt rear end and a Dana 60 front, but I got a good deal on a pair (front and rear) of Dana 60's to start with. They are very rough, and need virtually everything replaced. So far I have bought just the incidentals to rebuild them (seals/bearings/nuts/shims/gaskets/etc) for about $600. Now I've gotta get different gears, different carriers (probably get lockers instead), leaf springs, rims, tires, drive shafts modified, cross over steering hardware, and all brake hardware, including calipers, disks, hoses, and brackets for the rear disks. That's not to mention the work I'll need to do to weld/install all this stuff. I'll be into the truck for another $6k at least by the time I'm done with this SAS conversion, but hopefully I'll be able to sell a few of my old upgrade parts to recoupe a little of it.
Kinda sad that I wasted a bunch of cash on that IFS front end to begin with, but my cup is still half full. When I'm done my truck will be MUCH stronger and ready for anything I wanna do with it. I also consider that I don't have a truck payment anymore, and if I bought a new truck I would be spending this money anyway.... :-)
So my opinion is IFS is great for a stock truck. If you modify it, it gets weak and will leave you dissapointed, both on and off the road.
SuperDave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I can see your concerns, a 6 FOOT lift kit would probably be weak unless it had tons of bracing & therefore very heavy - not good. Seriously, a solid axle setup would be easier to deal with during its' lifetime.
Blair wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry about the typo, I meant a six inch lift. Gotta get a proof reader.
Blair

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.