Integra starter solenoid rebuild experience

My 94 GSR was only cranking intermittently(new battery);Googled and read that the starter solenoid goes bad and the ENTIRE Nippondenso starter must
be replaced(according to the Haynes manual) for BIG bucks.Then I found a place that sells solenoid rebuild parts kits;for 24.95 + $5 shipping.Ordered one online Nov 4th,,got it the 16th. It's 3 parts,2 contacts and a new solenoid plunger.
The pipe from the air filter box to the throttle body must be removed to access the starter.I have a CAI,so that was not as much trouble to pull.
The hard part was getting the starter out;the bottom bolt,a LONG one,did not want to break loose,and naturally,there was not much room to work in. After that,it was easy replacing the bad parts. The 2 contacts were badly eroded (1/2 as thick as original!) and the plunger copper ring was pitted.
If anyone is interested,the company is Nation Bros. Auto Electric in Missouri. http://www.nationsautoelectric.com/Nippondenso.html
*Tegger*,you may want to add this to your excellent FAQ.
I just LOVE the Internet 8-)
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Jim Yanik
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The plunger and solenoid kits at the site you mentioned aren't made of copper. Because of the resistance the contacts and plunger may heat up just a bit and put out less amp to the starter. And possibly have difficulties starting on an extremely cold day, something Nippondenso would stay away from.
Because of this issue I reused my old Accord contacts. The contacts were formed into shape then reassembled with a washer. The contacts are 100% up to factory specifications and cost nothing. The Integra solenoid could be done the same way.
Unlike the Integra, the 89 Accord solenoid housing shell is pressed and sealed. This makes it difficult to open, but nonetheless very simple. Good job with your rebuild.

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The ones I received were copper.The plunger has a copper ring(just like the original),the rest is ferrous,otherwise,it would not work as the armature of the solenoid.
what do YOU think the new contacts are made of? and why?

HA,I live in central FLORIDA!! NO "extremely cold" days or nights! I'll be thinking of you this winter 8-)

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wrote in > >> http://www.nationsautoelectric.com/Nippondenso.html

You can see that silver has about the same appearance and tends to oxidize this way. The problem is that silver is many times the cost of copper. These contacts could be the inclusion of silver and other alloys to reduce cost, making its conductive property a mystery unless the website say so.
http://www.nationsautoelectric.com/images/66-82761.jpg
Certainly, silver can cost more, about 6-10USD/oz on today's market. Our high performance silver speaker cables were obtained for 1USD/foot. This could make it quite possible to form solenoid contacts. Silver has a slight edge over copper that is why silver cables performs so well. You will need to crank the amp up fairly high in order to get the sound to break up. Sound quality is also unbelievable.
Where copper can be annealed (heated) to maintain its flexibility, silver cannot and its also brittle and fragile by comparison.
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wrote in

IOW,you're GUESSING,you don't KNOW for certain.
I certainly would not depend on a simple digital picture to determine material of the contacts.
BUT,*I* actually have held the new contacts in my hands,I installed them myself. They're COPPER.

WHY in the world would they go to the trouble of alloys when they could just stamp out the pieces from readily available copper sheet?
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