1970 brakes

I can remember seeing inserts for pitted slave cylinder calipers some time in the past 30 years. Are these still available, how would I fit them and are there any problems? I don't really have any pitting in
mine, but I have had a problem keeping the outer seals located. I assumed that selecting a socket that fits exactly into the bore and hammering the seal in with it would expand them into the bore correctly, so why should 2 of them come out while I was reassembling the calipers? Is there anything else to do?
In UK, a refurbished pair of calipers cost about $600. I just paid over $100 for a fuel pump. I think that this is expensive and for light things it could well be cheaper to get them from The States. Does anyone know a dealer who would export?
From a big brake bleeding job in the past I have about 5 litres of brake fluid, that may be contaminated with water now. Is it possible to boil the water off or does the fluid boil first. It is quite clean. What is brake fluid anyway?
Thanks, George.
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George wrote:

Can't answer directly about the outer seals, but I think many Corvette parts vendors in the US will export, for example... http://www.mamotorworks.com/corvette-1-113.html http://tinyurl.com/239wxh
A buddy of mine has a friend in France who owns a Corvette, and he sometimes hand-carries needed parts when he visits France (and the friend hand-carries back when he visits the US).
As for brake fluid, why take a chance on used fluid, it's not all that expensive to buy it new. When I do a complete brake job I normally switch to Dot 5 silicone fluid, which doesn't absorb water. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brake_fluid http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOT_5
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George wrote:

Here's a general page on brake fluid - < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brake_fluid .
Since you are in the U.K., heed the Girling discussion. Remember to stick with the specified DOT type. Never cross-contaminate Silicone (DOT 5) with mineral or glycol based fluids.
Link on boiling points: < http://v8sho.com/SHO/BrakeFluid.htm
I've never heard of salvaging wet fluid. I would guess that an old DeLaval centrifugal lube-oil separator might work but I have no clue as to setup or adjustments. DeLaval is now better known for dairy equipment than for it's fuel and oil separators.
We gladly accept all the Sterling we can get our hands on! And, your Barclay's card should be good here.
Google is your friend: < international corvette parts >
One of the larger outfits is Eckler's in Florida. Phone number at the top of the webpage will not work from the U.K. Here are the international numbers:
    International Sales: 1-321-269-9651.      IIRC, dial a zero first.     International Fax: 1-321-385-2102     Online: http://www.ecklers.com
        Ask for a C3 catalog.
and, here's a link to Flow Chevrolet:     < http://www.gmpartsdirect.com/ sometimes good for a part number.
There are many other fine outfits here that will ship internationally -- most accept VISA, MC, AMEX. AFAIK none of them will ship COD to the U.K.
If you see one that interests you, ask here for someone's experience with the outfit.
-- pj
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I would image, given your problem that the caliper bores are worn-out beyond tolerance. 1970?, they're nearly 40 years old! Rebuilding brake components is false economy. Someone further into this thread referenced the U.S Army (Silicone Brake Fluid - BFS), The Army banned rebuilding of hydraulic brake components in 1979. Back in the day, with lower speeds, less autos on the highway, and not nearly the amount of aggressive driving as seen today, it was a common practice to overhaul brake cylinders and the like. Not worth it anymore. Then there's those that say "I want keep my car original and authentic". Well, if you put more emphasis on aesthetics than you do safety,.... please get off the highway, as I have several grand-children that have enough dangers to worry about in this crazy world without having to worry about some nut with shade-tree brakes on their car.
Think about it. If the seals did stay in the bore, and you got out on the road, had to apply the brakes in an emergency, and THEN your seals popped-out, what would you do then?
You wouldn't put rebuilt tires on your 'vette, so why the brakes?
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A common problem for vehicles like Vettes that are driven infrequently is a build up of moisture in the steel caliper bores which leads to pitting and brake failure.
In the early 80s I had a 72 Vette and after driving about 5 hours through the Canadian Rockies, the brakes failed at 70 mph. Fortunately, it was a 4 speed standard and between downshifting and the pitiful parking brake I was able to stop.
The solution is to replace your calipers with stainless steel ones.
arden25 wrote:

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