changing ignition key cylinder

Lost the key and want to change cylinder. What's the trick? Do I have to pull the steering wheel?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

On what model?
On a '86 Tempo, changing the cylinder involved nothing more than dropping the bottom plastic cover of the steering column, pressing out a pin, and unplugging 1 wire.....but it could be different for other models...
-LMB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Without the ability to turn the lock cylinder in order to allow pushing in the lock pin, you will likely have to drill out the cylinder. This is rarely a fun way to spend part of an afternoon. It is extremely easy to drill cock-eyed and really up the frustration factor.
Sorry to sound like a real curmudgeon, but there is no fun thing to say about this stuff. Keys were designed to be lost and the human condition includes an innate ability to lose keys (ask Mrs. mechanic).... I can't speak for anyone else, but I think there's no such thing as too many spares....

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim, can't you use a screwdriver to turn the cylinder once you access the pin? It's been a while but I thought you could.
CJB

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Somebody with a little better grip than me might be able to.... but this is one of the methods a car thief might try and he wont be worried about damaging the steering column. Don't forget that the lock cylinder is designed so that it "can't" be turned without a key in it.
The original poster needs to take it apart with the idea that he's going to put it back together...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You're right; I had a brain freeze. I had a CV in which the cylinder needed replacement. The contacts for the buzzer came apart and jammed it. I was thinking that I had used a screwdriver to turn the cylinder, but in retrospect I got some of the pieces far enough out of the way for the key to insert and turn it.
My bad.
CJB

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
i've lost a set of keys and made a call to a local locksmith who came out to the house and made the keys to the vehicle on the spot. cost. 55 dollars.
another place would have charged 140 dollars, so prices to vary quite a bit.
i ended up with keys to doors, trunk and ignition, so, in my opinion, it wasn't a bad deal, given the fact of what the locks would have cost and the time to install them.
might want to consider this as an option.
also, does the poster have travel insurance. sometimes, that is included in the cost of the benefits.
hope this helps.
~ curtis
knowledge is power - growing old is mandatory - growing wise is optional "Many more men die with prostate cancer than of it. Growing old is invariably fatal. Prostate cancer is only sometimes so." http://community.webtv.net/PALMER_ENT/doc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Too bad you did not have your key code you could have gotten keys cut for a buck a piece for a non coded key vehicle like yours. I always record the key codes on the back of my license ;)
mike hunt
c palmer wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Warman wrote:

You can turn the lock cylinder with a screwdriver and remove it IF it is an older Ford with a 5 or 10 cut square head key. Use a big screwdriver with wrench flats near the handle (Mac, Snap On). This will destroy the cylinder but not the column. There used to be a tool for this purpose called a Bypass Key. They're not available to the general public (same category as lock picks), but a large screwdriver also works. Break off the "wings" first.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jery wrote:

What kind of car?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
model is an '87 ford ranger xlt 4x4
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Have a locksmith make a new key.
Fred

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Missed the OP - but sometimes even a new key won't turn the cyl. I have on occaision had to resort to driving the pin in to enable the cyl to be removed (because the cyl generally needs to be in an unlocked position to depress the pin). When done carefully (if there is such a thing) the cyl can be replaced without replacing any other parts of the column.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@sny.der.on.ca wrote:

Fred, Just driving in the pin usually results in cracking the column. The cylinder can be turned with a large screwdriver and a wrench to the ON position. You can then depress the pin and remove the cylinder.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 06 Jun 2005 06:50:45 -0400, Tom Adkins

And doing this often damages the column too, as the "tumblers" score the bore as they get deformed enough to let the cyl move.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@sny.der.on.ca wrote:

The tumblers are on the inner cylinder and surrounded by the cylinder barrel (all one assembly). The barrel is keyed heavily to the column and held in place by the pin. There's almost no way that forcing the cylinder around in the barrel can damage the column, it ain't going to turn. This destroys the lock cylinder assembly though. If you don't believe me, try it on your next trip to the boneyard. It works on all of the older style cylinders like in the Tempo, Gen I and II Taurus, pickups till about 95 etc. Break off the wings first, tap the screwdriver in the slot, turn the screwdriver with a wrench to the on position, push the pin and slide the cylinder asy out. Less than 30 seconds. There used to be a tool available to repo companies, mechanics, and law enforcement for just this purpose.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 06 Jun 2005 22:07:54 -0400, Tom Adkins

You are right. I was wrong - but I have done it with the punch numerous times.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@sny.der.on.ca wrote:

Dang that sounds so contrite, not my intention at all Fred. Really. I'm embarrassed now. No disrespect intended. Every time I tried to drive the pin in, I, and everyone else in the shop, managed to mangle the column. This was at Hertz Rent a Car, and we did a lot of them. One guy used to burn the cylinder out with a torch! The pin, by default, butts in to a steel ring on the inner cylinder except in the ON position.(probably to prevent removal that way). We all bought "Bypass Keys" from the Mac tool man and it was a 30 second operation after that. Mine disappeared and I've been using the big screwdriver ever since. Try it sometime, it's pretty slick.
            Regards, Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.