cd player speed?

2004 honda accord EXL equipped with 6 pack cd player (honda) in dash. Question: Playing duration seems longer as if the cd is rotating with revolution per minute resulting with slight reduction enjoyment(ie: music)
In otherwords the effect sounds `draggy'. Is there a standard at which cd's are oppose to spin and can it be adjusted within this honda equipment? Thanks in advance of any/all replies. Don
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Mary Gaunt wrote:

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:-) It's because of your (Canadian) metric speedometer. In America, the speedo only shows 65, while yours shows 100 Km/hr. Try driving slightly below the speed limit and everything will sound 'zippier'. :-)
I'm pulling your leg, of course. Maybe you're hanging out at Starbucks too much, and your body is running too fast?
'Curly'
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Mary Gaunt wrote:

This is not possible. If the CD was spinning too slowly, it would not extend the duration of the music, It would start skipping. CDs are not like a record player or tape player. With those analog devices, yes, slower speed results in slower music (and lower pitch) and a draggy effect.

I'm sure there is a minimum speed that CDs need to spin, but most CD players spin faster for skip protection (by reading ahead and buffering data). BTW, CD players do not spin at a constant speed. For the inner tracks, it spins faster. For the outer tracks, it spins slower.
In any case, you cannot change this in the Honda equipment. Most likely is the speaker quality or EQ settings making it sound draggy.
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without the music breaking up. What we hear is actually digitized audio being read from the CD as the player needs the data, then decoded (the CD has a fairly sophisticated coding scheme to prevent scratches from showing up as clicks) and sent to the speakers at a very precise rate. What this all means is that the difference you hear comes from something other than the rate at which the CD spins.
Mike
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However, it could be that the clock for the digital-to-analog coverter could be slow. It would be crystal controlled, and essentially not adjustable. The fix would be a new player.
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the human ear could discern.
Mike
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difference, unless it's a bad clock divider - in any case, the cost-effective solution is to replace, unless you have a lot of equipment and time.
All of that assumes that it really *is* slow - I wonder if the OP has actually timed the length of anything on the suspect player and compared it with a "normal" player vs. what the cd says the run time is....
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:-) I've never seen a working crystal off by enough to hear... maybe .01%. Safe to say the actual frequency reproduction is fine, that the problem is either output/speaker problems or perception.
Mike
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