CV Wheel Nut

Hi, Its a 92 Acura Intregra, and we are trying to replace the drivers side cv axle. The problem is the nut is seized on and rusted out... its even stripped. :) What would you use to get the nut off?

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The last resort for that kind of thing is an air chisel. Are you sure it's too stripped (I presume you mean rounded) for a 6 point impact socket? Even without rust those are *awfully* tight and best done with an impact wrench.
Mike
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Michael Pardee wrote:

Split one last week that was like that. My 3/4" heavy truck air impact gun makes 340 foot pounds of torque, and didn't work. Then, I put my 1/2" Craftsman heavy bar on my 6 point impackt socket, along with my long hydralic jack handle, and put all my 300 pounds on it, and snapped the wrecker bar. would have used my 3/4" bar, but, it is somewhere in one of my other tool boxes... plus, the long jack handle won't fit over the thing...
So, split the nut. Used a cold steel hand chisel and my 2 pound sledge, and wore goggles... took about ten minutes.
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Linuxiac wrote:

i'd be interested to see how long your wheel bearings last after that!
the real deal solution, that runs no risk of damage to the bearings, is an air impact driver. a good quality driver connected to a high volume air supply with 1/2" hose will shift it in about 3 seconds.
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If such trauma damaged the wheel bearings, the noise would be immediate.

It's worth trying an electric DeWalt impact gun. You can rent them for about $25 per day from most industrial rental places.
The DeWalt is capable of 325 ft lbs of torque and does not require a compressor. It is one impressively powerful piece of equipment. I'm sure one day I will come across a bolt that mine won't shift, but that day has not yet arrived.
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Tegger wrote:

not necessarily. for badly brinelled bearings, yes, but the effect can be much more insidious.

i've been resisting it, but i may break down and get an electric impact. a cordless version that i can take junkyard surfing is /real/ attractive.
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I see what you're getting at. You're thinking surface damage that may not be apparent until it begins flaking. I was thinking little dents in the races, which would cause a howl right away.

You won't regret it, believe me. It makes things SO much easier. No longer is your heart in your throat with every bolt you tackle. You actually have confidence that you'll be able to finish a job quickly and easily.
And it makes removing wheels a breeze.

Haven't tried one of those myself, but others I know who have say they're wonderful.
The only problem I've found with the electric guns is their extreme bulk. They're just about useless in an engine bay or other tight spots, even with U-joints. But anywhere you have lots of room, they're great.That means axle nuts, suspension bolts, crank pulley bolts, subframe bolts, that sort of thing.
One of the best tools I ever bought, outside of the balljoint puller. I used both of those when I changed my alternator a few weeks ago. What a time-saver.
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Tegger wrote:

more like little dents become bigger dents. bit like a "flat tire" on a railroad car. a tiny flat spot becomes a big one just through use.
flaking is spalling caused by fatigue. that's usually overload or abrasion damage scratching the running surfaces - and those scratches then nucleate fatigue.

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A torch does wonders.:-)
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Zippo wrote:

yeah, it ruins bearings and bearing seals. wonderful.
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Now im not talking "Red" hot here.A slight touch with a torch for ten seconds or so and wait for a minute to let the heat travel through is sufficient.Done it several times and no bearing or seal was hurt during the telecast.Maybe it's where experience comes into play.:-)
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Zippo wrote:

i have plenty of experience - i used to do this stuff for a living and probably know more about emergency field repairs than most. the steel used in ball bearings starts to soften at only a couple of hundred degrees centigrade. seals cook well before that. you probably won't notice an immediate effect, but it will definitely have a "down the road" detrimental effect on bearing life and sealing.
if you don't have the gear, the guaranteed safe and absolutely most effective strategy is to drive it to the local shop and have them spin it off with the proper air tool. a couple of beers for the guys is /way/ cheaper than a new bearing.
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