2001 XG300 Fill-up Problems revisted

Hyundaitech seems to think my constant start and stopping of the gas station hose while filling up, at every 1/3 of a gallon (it is that bad), might be the canister filter. Is the canister filter hard to
get to and if not, what kind of tools or procedures do you need to get the old one out and the new one in. I do not see it on the HMA fuel tank components page. Everytime I go to the dealership it's $700 and if possible I'd like to do it myself or bring it to a much cheaper place than a dealer...if the install isn't much.
By the way, when I asked this question last time in September, I thought the electrical system could have something to do with the fi;l;-up problem. I ended up needed a new alternator. They wanted to replace the battery too but it wasn't that old and I asked them to charge it and it's been fine. I was surprised they didn't change the harness. Many years ago I had a maxima that had three alternators replaced by "electrical geniuses." Then I went to Nissa and they said when you change the alternator, for the Maxima, you have to change the harness too. Sure enough it worked.
Alan
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The canister, filter, and close valve are all located under the left rear corner of the vehicle. One or two 12mm bolts/nuts to lower the assembly.
As for your alternator issue, there's normally little reason to replace the harness when replacing an alternator. I suspect the issue with your Maxima was either that the alternator had a revised design requiring a harness replacement or that the issue was an inherent problem with the harness itself causing the alternator to burn up.
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Welcome back
Striker....
wrote:

The canister, filter, and close valve are all located under the left rear corner of the vehicle. One or two 12mm bolts/nuts to lower the assembly.
As for your alternator issue, there's normally little reason to replace the harness when replacing an alternator. I suspect the issue with your Maxima was either that the alternator had a revised design requiring a harness replacement or that the issue was an inherent problem with the harness itself causing the alternator to burn up.
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So the canister, the canister filter and the close valve all should be replaced or just the filter? I take it that connects to the gas tank and a feed pipe and at some point you are actually lowering the gas tank when you lower "the aseembly?" Is that correct?
Once it's removed, how do you separate the pieces that yu have t look at and or replace? Is this something a novice should do?
On Wed, 17 Nov 2010 16:41:41 -0800 (PST), hyundaitech

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You won't need to lower the tank. To remove the assembly, you'll need to disconnect three hoses and remove one electrical connector. Be sure to disconnect the hoses from the vehicle in such a way that you know which one attaches where. You can then remove the entire assembly from the car and work on it on a workbench or table. If my memory is correct, the items are all tied onto a plastic holder with a zip tie, but I have also seen some bolted in. Disassembly after removal is pretty much straightforward, with the exception of the filter which simply snaps onto the end of the canister.
The canister will be the large black plastic item. The close valve is the item to which the electrical connector attaches. And the filter is a small black plastic box.
You can try blowing through the various components to see if they're restricted, but the necessary jostling to remove the assembly is likely to free up a stuck close valve or move the blockage inside the canister. If I were just guessing, which I am, I'd primarily suspect the canister filter on a car as old as yours, especially if you're in a dusty area. Whether you think it's worth replacing all three items (which is still not a guarantee of repair, as there are other less frequent failures which can also cause this issue) or just the filter is a decision you'll need to make. If it were me, I'd just go with the filter, but if it's especially difficult for you to disassemble, there may be an advantage for you for replacing all three items.
If you're capable of using a socket wrench and pliers, you'll probably be able to do this with the worst problem being hoses that are difficult to separate from pipes.
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As you see, I am reluctant to bring the car in to Hyundai, especially because there are lots of things that can lead to this probem and I have heard of people spending more than a thousand dollars to fix it. I don't have access to a lift but I was trying to get together hints for non-Hyundai server stations.
I did have one more question though, what about putting a snake into the gas fill up line. I have a plumbers snake that attaches to my drill or a thin wire electrical snake that probably won't do much. I wonder if I use the plumber's snake, might it get caught someplace and I won't be able to get it out?
Alan
On Wed, 1 Dec 2010 18:13:33 -0800 (PST), hyundaitech

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I wouldn't recommend this. It will only test the inlet, and then not all that well. In addition, as you suggest, it might get caught in the anti-spill valve at the filling inlet to the tank.
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