Aftermarket ESC

I've got an Elantra with ABS and I'm wondering if there's an aftermarket ESC kit for it? Seems like it should be possible since the car already has ABS
and Tracking Control...? I may be dreaming, but buying a new car with ESC is not an option at the moment.
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wrote:

Probably not easily. You probably need a new computer, but maybe a junk yard would be reasonably priced.
Check this out for some ideas http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/hrdp_1108_abs_for_hot_rods/viewall.html
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Ed, thanks for the reply. That's a great article about the hot rod retro-fit. Might be cheaper - and certainly easier - to buy a new car though :-) More importantly unless an ESC kit was designed for a specific make and model car how could you feel completely confident that it would work properly?
"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
wrote:

Probably not easily. You probably need a new computer, but maybe a junk yard would be reasonably priced.
Check this out for some ideas http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/hrdp_1108_abs_for_hot_rods/viewall.html
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wrote:

I noticed they used a unit from a similar weight and weight distribution vehicle. I imaging that may be important. I have a sort of vague idea how it works, but not enough to say if that is necessary or if it can be reprogrammed.
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On Sunday, December 16, 2012 10:34:50 AM UTC-5, Victek wrote:

I didn't go the the link, but I wouldn't recommend this. It doesn't take much of a malfunction for the car to be unsafe. Probably at least once a week or so, I find myself test driving a car wondering whether the customer is referring to a normally-occurring issue or whether there is a problem with the car. One of those cases was a car that was described as intermittently pulling to the right. Left wondering whether this was a road variation issue or an actual problem with the car, I was just about ready to give up and return when the problem occurred. What occurred was that the vehicle suddenly slowed and pulled hard to the right. This could have easily sent someone into a curb or even off the road. The cause was a faulty yaw sensor that went undetected by the stability control module. The module believed the sensor's reading that the vehicle was turning left despite the wheels being directed straight ahead, and the ESC was very vigorously applying the right front brake.
These are precision components that are designed specifically for each vehicle. The yaw and g-sensors need to be securely and precisely mounted and properly calibrated for proper operation.
Wait until you buy your next car and purchase the feature then. I don't particularly believe that trying to make something work is going to be any safer than not having stability control in the first place. And the cost to do it right would make it worth just trading-in and buying the car with that equipment in the first place.
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I didn't go the the link, but I wouldn't recommend this. It doesn't take much of a malfunction for the car to be unsafe. Probably at least once a week or so, I find myself test driving a car wondering whether the customer is referring to a normally-occurring issue or whether there is a problem with the car. One of those cases was a car that was described as intermittently pulling to the right. Left wondering whether this was a road variation issue or an actual problem with the car, I was just about ready to give up and return when the problem occurred. What occurred was that the vehicle suddenly slowed and pulled hard to the right. This could have easily sent someone into a curb or even off the road. The cause was a faulty yaw sensor that went undetected by the stability control module. The module believed the sensor's reading that the vehicle was turning left despite the wheels being directed straight ahead, and the ESC was very vigorously applying the right front brake.
These are precision components that are designed specifically for each vehicle. The yaw and g-sensors need to be securely and precisely mounted and properly calibrated for proper operation.
Wait until you buy your next car and purchase the feature then. I don't particularly believe that trying to make something work is going to be any safer than not having stability control in the first place. And the cost to do it right would make it worth just trading-in and buying the car with that equipment in the first place.

Thanks for the real world example. By the way, it's scary that the problem you describe was not detectable by the computer. I wonder how often that occurs?
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On Tuesday, December 18, 2012 3:15:30 PM UTC-5, Victek wrote:

I've only ever seen it the one time.
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