Results of fitting EBC "Greenstuff" brake pads

I don't recall who suggested fitting EBC Greenstuff brake pads to my 50th Anniversary Disco a couple of months ago, but many thanks to you.
No one is ever happy to do an emergency stop, but the three or four times I've had to do one for real in the last ten years has always left me shaking my head at the feebleness of the standard brakes. They just seem to lack authority. Obviously I don't want to skid particularly, but I've never felt that I was stopping the car as quickly as I should either.
Well the Greenstuff brake pads have done the job. The difference is NOT day-and-night. Under normal braking no one would notice a change. But I have just returned from a trip to Italy during which I had to stop pretty smartly a couple of times and I was astonished at how confidently the car behaved.
Coming back via Switzerland, over the Simplonpass, the brakes get a real work-out too, and I am sure I am not imagining the improved performance under endlessly repeated hard braking there either.
So, heartily recommended.
Roy
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On 24/08/2007 09:43, Roy Hann wrote:

That would be me :)

Ive got to get some on my defender..
They also dont any leave black deposits on the wheels, which is cool.
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On or around Fri, 24 Aug 2007 09:43:23 +0100, "Roy Hann"

Personally, I found them better when hot and not so good when cold.
also, if you have a standard disco with crap brakes, there's a reason for it - when in proper order and with suitable pads, they're not crap. Often, the rear ones are non-functional :-)
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message enlightened us thusly:

The brakes were not crap. I said that under emergency conditions they always left me feeling they could have done better.
As I think I mentioned in my orignal posting several months ago, my Disco is regularly and thoroughly maintained by experts (i.e. not me). There was nothing wrong with the standard brakes that time or money was ever able to improve, and under all ordinary circumstances they always worked fine.
Just so there's no confusion, I am not advocating expensive fancy brake pads as an alternative to ordinary maintenance.
Roy
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Back in my motorcycle days we always rated EBC pads above all others. Changing to Goodridge Aero hose also helped as the amoured outer stopped the rubber hose from expanding under braking, thus allowing more of your braking effort to reach the brakes. Don't know if this is a suitable mod for LR's though. TonyB
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On or around Fri, 24 Aug 2007 19:20:12 +0100, "TonyB"

You can get equivalent hoses. I'd tend to reckon that you need to inform the insurers - heard recently of insurance hassles form someone having upgraded a disco to vented discs/brakes. Whether the hassle was getting insurance or non-disclosure and problems wit a payout I don't know - it's the old "not fitted to this model when new" chestnut.
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On Fri, 24 Aug 2007 19:20:12 +0100, TonyB wrote:

To my brain that doesn't feel right. This is hydraulics, the hydraulic pressure is what gives the braking effect so same pressure same effect.
With "expanding hoses" you need to push a little more fluid in (longer pedal travel) but once equilibrium is reached the pressure is the same. The pedal will have a longer travel and feel softer but braking effort for a given pressure must be the same surely or am I missing something.
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On or around Tue, 28 Aug 2007 21:47:34 +0100 (BST), "Dave Liquorice"

'bout right. better feel - ultimately, I suppose, if the hoses are too stretchy, then it'd limit the pressure you can apply. Mainly it's about sharper pedal/lever feel though AIUI.
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In enlightened us thusly:

I'm having trouble with this, a flexible hose by definition is pliable and thus stretchy. I'm not sure how one differentiates the hose performance if for example it is very elastic versus a 'stiff' hose and one with a hole in it. Seems to me these are all the same only differing in degree. in a black box scenario how could one tell the difference twixt a solid pipe with a small perferation and a hose the consistancy of a balloon. I suspect in this 'artificial' scenario the answer is you can't in either case you get no brakes. Equilibrium is not acheived before the floor and buttons bitten off seat squab?
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