Traction control 5008



On most cars it works by braking the wheel which is starting to spin. Fine on a normal less than perfect surface like a wet one, but actually is worse on ice.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 03/03/2018 23:58, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

and if engine power is reduced at the same time you can stay there indefinitely, 'stuck'
We have had so many mild winters now, that half of all drivers do not have a clue about driving in actual bad conditions, couple that with the reliance on driving aids to get them out of trouble in average road conditions is a good recipe for crashes.
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I was brought up in the N of Scotland, so fairly well used to observe driving in snow and ice, and learning how to.
Although weather conditions in London itself weren't anything like as bad as elsewhere, was still surprised to see so many driving on the bad bits as if it was a dry clean road. Mainly light vans.
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On 04/03/2018 07:38, MrCheerful wrote:

That is exactly what happened. With the system switched on or off it made no difference. When the car eventually slowly moved I suspect it was the heat from the spinning tyres friction which melted the ice and gave it enough grip to get moving.
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On 04/03/2018 14:24, Graham T wrote:

the old trick is to use forward and reverse rapidly alternated to clear a larger bit of ground to start from, tricky to do in a manual, but not impossible.
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On 05/03/2018 17:29, MrCheerful wrote:

Since you sometimes get stuck on a bit of an incline, you can "rock" even in one gear by judicious manipulation of clutch and throttle.
There's also the old Swedish trick, for RWD cars with rear handbrakes, to put the handbrake on lightly if one wheel is spinning, then you can often get enough torque on to the "good" wheel to get you moving.
Still not totally out of date; apart from Beemers, my Suzuki Carry van is RWD (and a bit of a liability on mud or driving briskly on wet roads). It stays firmly on the drive in any snow or ice.
IIRC the handbrake on the Citroen CX and its famous FWD predecessors was on the front wheels (because it had rear disk brakes). I can't recall having any significant trouble with snow in the years when I was running them, perhaps thanks to the weight distribution!
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