How hard is it to replace a clutch in a 5-speed manual transmission?



What I don't understand, since I don't even know why this "alignment tool" is needed, is what happens if I don't have this special alignment tool?
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On 23/09/2017 6:39 PM, Chaya Eve wrote:

You either need a very good eye - or be very good with god. Most people, in my experience anyhow, seem good with neither.
I have aligned clutch plates by eye in the past, and been successful, but I have a good eye for such things. Most people do not. Hence the need for a clutch aligning tool.
http://lh4.ggpht.com/_Ii1ukGkfijY/SqiGqnyhWcI/AAAAAAAABmo/mpbwx2EWv5w/clip_image0013.jpg?imgmax 0
In the picture link above, observe the right hand diagram. It shows the gearbox mounted up and the input shaft passing through the clutch plate and entering the spigot bush. The plate faces are clamped to the flywheel by the pressure plate. When you release that clutch, the plate comes free of the faces but is still on the input shaft. So it stays there but spinning freely. Now refer to the left hand diagram. When you are installing the clutch and pressure plate, that is what you will have - no gearbox hence no input shaft. The input shaft will be sitting on the floor still attached to the gearbox. Not a lot of use there when you need it to align that plate into the correct central location during installation. That's why you need a *dummy shaft*. A clutch aligning tool is nothing more than a dummy shaft that you can use temporarily as a substitute for that input shaft while fitting up the clutch and pressure plate to the flywheel. In short, the exact centre of the clutch plate needs to be aligned exactly with the centre of the spigot bush. The dummy shaft ensures that alignment exists as you tighten the pressure plate bolts. If you fail to align the two, and it only needs to be a poofteenth of a millifart out, when you insert the input shaft (still attached to the gearbox, remember), you will get it up to and onto the spline - possibly - but the nose of the shaft may not be able to go the next step - enter the spigot shaft bush. This is simply because of misalignment. If, for any reason, you drop the rear end of the gearbox down whilst the input shaft is partially on the clutch plate splines but not in the spigot bush, you run the real risk of distorting the clutch plate after which it will be stuffed. A distorted clutch plate will fail to release cleanly - or at all.
You can get the exact tool for your vehicle that looks like this;
https://frsport.com/images/detailed_images/16436_FRSPORT_CT%205300_FG02-01.jpg
Note how it looks just like a gearbox input shaft.
Or a universal tool like this one;
http://www.toolsinstock.com/admin/images/0314.jpg
I prefer this type if I am going for a universal type.
https://i.frg.im/Srp6lau/121048656058-0_600.jpg
The top row of adapters is meant to fit the different internal diameters of the clutch plate spline. The bottom row of adapters is meant to fit the spigot bearing.
Alignment is everything. It's also why your jack needs a lot more *tilt angle* than you think.
--

Xeno

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On 9/23/2017 4:39 AM, Chaya Eve wrote:

Without it you curse a lot. You may need blood pressure medication too.
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On 24/09/2017 12:22 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

True that!
--

Xeno

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On 09/23/2017 08:22 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

And if you're taking blood thinners or even common aspirin, band-aids, plenty of band-aids....
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Some videos are titled "toyota versus mechanic, round 2".
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On 9/23/2017 1:24 PM, Chaya Eve wrote:

Maybe brutal but Fiat vs Mechanic is a death match.
--
Andrew Muzi
<www.yellowjersey.org/>
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On 09/23/2017 12:29 PM, AMuzi wrote:

I had a Fiat Spyder but it didn't last long enough for me to work on it. After a few heated discussions with the car salesman we worked out a deal where I got a Mustang. I think the promise to park the damn Fiat in his office got his attention.
I did do a rebuild on an Alfa Romeo Giulietta though. Wet sleeve engine? Who does that anymore? I also have a couple of scars from when a friend rolled his in which I was a passenger. They do not hold up well going 60mph upside down and backwards.
I never had an Italian bike. Desmodromic valves are too weird even for me.
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On 24/09/2017 6:21 AM, rbowman wrote:

The concept is good, the execution sucks.
--

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Try Moscavitch or Lada Vs Mechanic on for size. Or Peugeot - or old Jag.
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On 9/24/2017 6:00 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

+1 Indeed.
I did defeat a Simca, making it actually drive away, against its nature. That was touch and go for a while.
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On 09/24/2017 05:00 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

XK120, shudder. But they were so classy... Never heard of a Moskvitch but from some of the photos it looks like a rebranded 1962 Rambler Classic.
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On 09/23/2017 12:24 PM, Chaya Eve wrote:

Work on cars long enough and you figure they're all Christine's siblings. I had a '60 Plymouth that I'm certain was a relative. It started as a pushbutton Torqueflite and ended up as a floor shift manual. That's when I learned about endless projects. Among other difficulties the parking brake for the AT was a drum on the end of the transmission. I wasn't concerned about that until the lack of a safety brake was pointed out to me by a State Trooper. So, next project was swapping out the rear axle for one that had a safety brake and fabricating the linkage. No big deal after inventing the whole hydraulic clutch system from miscellaneous parts laying around.
Kept me out of trouble, I guess.
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Is this very first second of this video showing the alignment tool in action? <
https://youtu.be/NcTmlO9XN1E

https://youtu.be/NcTmlO9XN1E

It seems to take a split second, but the video is artificially sped up.
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On 09/23/2017 11:59 AM, Chaya Eve wrote:

Yeah, that's a pretty good video. It just holds the clutch plate in place and then you pull it out when the pressure plate is snugged down. The video also illustrates what I meant about working around tightening the pressure plate screws gradually and in a pattern around the pressure plate. You'll also want to do the gradual thing when removing it or it will start to cock and make removing the screws difficult. Once you've backed them out enough to release the spring pressure all around then you remove them one by one.
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On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 08:39:06 +0000 (UTC), Chaya Eve

The splines on the clutch disc must line up with the splines on the flywheel.
When the pressure plate is tightened in place, the clutch disc is held very firmly in place. Without aligning the splines first, you will likely have a very difficult time inserting the transmission shaft through the clutch disc and into the flywheel.
You can probably get a loaner for free from an Autozone store, or, you can buy an inexpensive one on Amazon for $6 - $7. It is money well spent.
First timers frequently think they can do it without the tool, and, you might get lucky, but, most of the time, you will piss away a great deal of time and get very frustrated. It gets even more frustrating if the vehicle is not on a lift and if you are laying on your back doing the work.
Additional hints: always replace the throwout bearing, using a kevlar lined clutch can dramatically extend the life of the clutch and take your flywheel to a transmission shop and pay them to true it up on their lathe, the fee is usually quite reasonable.
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I REALLY don't think so. Hint: no splines on the flywheel.
The clutch disk has to line up with the pilot bearing.
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Yes, you are of course correct, I made an error about spline on the flywheel. Brainfart.
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removal, from office, of the greatest threat to peace the world has ever known.
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On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 14:57:38 +0000, Stormin' Norman

This seems to show exactly what you're talking about at time 142 seconds: <
https://youtu.be/9UmrCl2nLKM?t

https://youtu.be/9UmrCl2nLKM?t
2>

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On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 18:24:24 +0000 (UTC), Chaya Eve

Here is a nice, step by step procedure for clutch replacement, including one exploded diagram.
http://www.autozone.com/repairguides/Toyota-Corolla-1988-1997-Repair-Guide/CLUTCH/Driven-Disc-and-Pressure-Plate/_/P-0900c1528006f59a
Note, in the diagram, they label what I call a "throw-out bearing" as a "release bearing". I am sure their terminology is accurate.
Video's are nice but still-image, annotated, step by step instructions can be invaluable.
--

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removal, from office, of the greatest threat to peace the world has ever known.
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