Bullet Hole

Picked up a bullet hole in the driver's door after dinner last evening. Looks like it was an aft to forward glancing hit, a gouge about 1.75 inches long by 5/8 inch high. Depth micrometer shows max depth of 2mm.
Some gray discoloration, probably lead, in the plastic substrate along the bottom of the gouge. (Didn't stop to ask what weapon and ammo.)
I'd be tempted to try making the repair on the white car but the metallic blue has me spooked and I've decided not to mess with it. Can choose any body shop since I raised my deductible to $1K a couple of weeks ago. What should the body guy be looking at and what kinds of choices might he make. (and which ones do I want to refuse?) I know that years back, a bondo fill and paint wouldn't have been OK since it would shrink. What's good now--what's not?
Oh yeah, about how thick is the driver's door on the C5, about 9 inches up from the bottom edge and 15 inches ahead of the back edge? -- PJ
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Bondo, or just about any plural component filler. It didn't shrink years ago, the lacquer that was being used had some weird affects on filler edges. It's used in production plants on new cars or was a few years back, now they just leave the seam or stick a plastic strip over it.
If I have a repair that tends to lift the edges I mix in about 10% marine epoxy resin, hard, dense, and won't lift or bleed color. I have some pictures of a C2 coupe being done in ACI that is covered in Bondo and they are an after market Corvette parts manufacturer. I was working plural component pump setups for mold lay-up and gel coat spray and was surprised to see that much on a C2.

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Dad wrote:

Thanks Dad, You just changed my mind on this. Off to the body guy in Chula Vista store to get some modern stuff -- the two-part stuff in the garage is at least 20 years old. Also out with the Dremel tool -- clean out the junk and punch 3 or 4 small holes through to the inside to anchor the filler.
I can do this! Almost feel young again! -- PJ
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No holes required or wanted, just ruff it up with 24/36 grit and get all of the dust out, you're good to go. Actually the hole acts like a wick and the moisture it sucks in will blow your patch off. Never put filler on filler without roughing up the surface, it won't stick to an untouched surface. Work out the gouge until it's correct and you don't see the edges of your work when you sand the primer.
If you have an air brush get a can of the proper Dupla color and turn it up side down an let the propellant out, then with it well shaken carefully punch a small hole in the bottom while upside down. When it is under no pressure cut it open and put the paint in a new can and get all of the iridescent and flake out of the spray can.
Now with the airbrush at low pressure and a good fan dust on a light coat. When completely dry wet sand with block and 400, and repeat when it's dry. You'll soon see any imperfections as you sand the color coat and when they are gone sand with 600 and repeat. You should start with a small spot to just cover your work and get bigger with each sanding to blend into the surrounding color and know down the overspray. When you like what you see cover the entire spot with clear lacquer and sand when dry. Your last coat should be very thin clear lacquer larger that your field of work. Wet sand with 1000/1200 and buff then polish to your final shine.
That's what I've been doing all day, work 15 minutes and wait a hour before a sand it out again, trying to get him in the show tomorrow.
Now, back out to the shop and good luck,
--
Dad
05 C6 Silver/Red 6spd Z51
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Got your post in time to prevent a dumbshit. Cleaned out the 'gouge' and got it filled.
My airbrush skills are equal to my welding skills (I burn holes, I don't weld). However, good news is that our advertising & catalog retoucher (now working with computers) used to do most of her work with an airbrush. She says wait a few days for the humidity to drop (we are doing hot and sweaty here) and she'll spread some primer on it then, the color.
I think we're gonna win. Thanks again.. -- PJ
Dad wrote:

--
PJ
'89 Hookercar, '02 e-blu 6-spd coupe

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Get your primer on long before you try to paint it with Dupli color. It's lacquer and can use some extra drying time. To keep from making lots of over spray use a template, don't mask it off with tape. Mount the template on Styrofoam blocks to hold it off the surface to be painted about an inch. Then spray straight at the spot you want to cover with a sweeping motion about a foot away from the template. Just let the primer drift onto the spot and let dry.Sand and repeat if any imperfections show up, you should be using 400 wet by the time you're finished ready for color.

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While you're at it, might as well stick a 1/2" steel plate inside the door panel!
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