GM missed a recall of my 2000 C5.

It has a slot for the key ring instead of a single hole. As I was driving along, I gave the key chain a a light tug and the ignition switched off. W
hie the press says you lose steering and brakes, you actually lose power as sist and air bags, but I can't verify that. Being an experienced driver, I pushed in the clutch and restarted the engine. Should I write a letter to GM about this problem?
I decided to check out the 2009 Malibu, not a part of the recall. Even a h ard tug on the keychain would not turn the ignition switch off. I turned t he ignition off manually and had steering and brakes, unpowered. I put the transmission in neutral and restarted the engine. No problem.
According to the published results, all of the fatalities involved young ne w drivers who believed they couldn't stop or steer and went off the road hi tting tress without airbag deployment.
As an engineer, I thought about this and wondered why the key slot is not v ertical on the dash? The recall will simply make it a harder pull to turn off the ignition. A vertical key would make it impossible. Just sayin' .. .
Bob, Charlottesville
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Blue C5 wrote:

It's amazing to me how many people think you will lose control of a car simply because the engine dies or you turn the key to shut the engine down...I had the fuel pump go out on my '87 Vette a couple months ago and just steered the car onto shoulder out of traffic...at night. No muss no fuss.
As long as the key isn't pulled into the locking position you can drive the car. So now I have to wonder if the original recall series and fatalities included cases where the pulling the key ring put the ignition switch into the fully off position and also locked the steering column.
But as to your question, yeah - I'd report what you found. Sounds like all they need do is tell owners to get a re-designed key.
--
- Rufus

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why write GM? Go straight to NHTSA and send it to Mr. Packard, I believe his name was Dan but no longer have the information available. If you truly have a problem they will pickup your car and test it, they do not drive it, they trailer it to their lab enclosed and simulate the issue by computer.
Did you read the report of the accident that started this whole thing?
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/03/business/in-general-motors-recalls-inaction-and-trail-of-fatal-crashes.html?_r=0 Amber had put herself at considerable risk on July 29, when her car hit a tree around 4 a.m. in Dentsville, Md. She was not wearing her seatbelt, was legally drunk and had reached 69 miles an hour in a 25 m.p.h. zone just before the crash that killed her, according to a crash report. She was 16................what could GM do to keep her safe, looks like she had a death wish. The air bags were there because the automotive industries know that people will do stupid things, like not wear their seat belts, drink and use drugs, speed and most of all drive way over their ability.
As an engineer why would you want a metal key sticking out of the dash inline with your body parts when a collision does/could occur?
With the advent of electric power steering will that add to the problem?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dad wrote:

...as an engineer working with modern aircraft, nothing scares me *more* than the thought of a "fly by wire" car...get ready to pay six figures to cover the certification costs of insuring that these abominations aren't impacted by EMI alone.
Grief...it's bad enough that my Z06 has an electric gas pedal.
--
- Rufus

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If that scares you the heart attack of seeing what was controlling the B58 would have you out of that C5 in a flash. Been there done that, worked on an extended range modifications for a rickety old thing call the SR71-c by adding 2 liter of additional oxygen. Which, by the way they used to set a speed record to France, but broke it coming back. We built F/V/P oxygen valves by the thousands for WWII and not quite that many prop hubs, and vacuum pumps. We made the life support cryogenic systems for the space suites and the quarantine trailers Our aircraft division in Buffalo was spun off and I missed that part of my job, love aircraft.
On the Corvette steering, that I believe is electric on the C7, I was not allowed to do any thing other than push the pedals so I still don't know how it will feel to steer it with the power off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dad wrote:

Heh...sounds similar to a few things I've done/witnessed. Like dumping compressor air to gain stall margin on a cat stroke. And I still don't trust anti-lock brakes much either...even less so on a motorcycle...

Glad my Z06 is an '08...with a real rack and pinion, at least.
--
- Rufus

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Snip

Never had to worry about stall margin on a motorcycle but one of our club members has a '78 jet turbine powered Corvette that may need to be aware of its importance.
http://www.ncrsquebec.com/events/jet.html
Now tell me again why you would want a metal key sticking out of the dash waiting on your body parts to come kiss it? I'll take the push button any day, besides who wants to dig into his pocket/purse for a key to start a car? Also love to get out and walk away and know that it is locked but will open when you approach.
I'll wait to see how the electric steering works without power before I condemn it.
Dad
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dad wrote:

...heh...somebody *did* it! Back in another lifetime when I was working in the GE ASO at Ontario airport me and the guys in the shop came up with a way to put a GE T64 in my '82 Firebird...that's 4000+ horses...
...that we couldn't figure out was what to do for brakes...and how to keep the exhaust from chewing up the pavement.

I'd rather have the key sticking out of the steering column, but that's just me...

...and all you have to do to know how fly by wire steering will work with the power out is look at the F-16! Hydrazene secondaries, anyone?!
--
- Rufus

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Snip

Don't have to look at it, I've flown in it, and that of course, is not the only plane to fly by wire. Didn't they do that with the Apollo way back in 1964/5, then the F8 in 1972 with no backup system?
Dad
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dad wrote:

...that wasn't flying...that was falling - with style!
My uncle worked on Apollo...closest I ever got was to have a seat in a Gemini capsule that had been into space, next to a dummy astronaut. I must have only been 3 or 4, but I remember it well to this day...right hand seat.
I'm presently building an F-16 sim, and with some luck I may get a ride in a Hornet next month...wish me luck...
--
- Rufus

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Falling vertically was fun, rollover was not.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dad wrote:

...free falling is even more fun. Getting drug across the ground in a 40 knot wind because you can't get your handle off the Velcro, not so much...
--
- Rufus

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.