Warranty

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Hi!

Would they?
GM has had their share of mistakes, but they do get some things right. Take some cars that I have:
1 1988 Buick LeSabre "old lady" car. 150,000 miles and going strong. Power everything, it all works (although at present the power locks are blowing fuses--probably a chafed wire). Runs as well as the day it was made. This took five people to St. Louis, A/C going all the way and 30 miles to the gallon running 65 miles an hour. What more could you want?
2 1989 Buick Electra getting closer to 300,000 miles every day. Looks rough but runs like new. Interior has issues, but what do you want for a twenty year old car that hasn't seen the best of care? You can let go of the wheel at 70 miles an hour and the car just keeps going straight forward. Rust will get it before anything goes wrong in the powertrain department.
3 Borrowed '97 Oldsmobile Eighty-Eight -- another 3800 based creation. Very plush, very comfortable and has about 106,000 on the clock. Runs perfectly. The only hokey thing about it is the cup holder, which is more of a cup spiller. Makes me wonder how many people have crashed their Olds when a drink went south. <g>
I'll point out that you see more of these old BOP cars on the road here, even twenty years after they were made, in a state where cars regularly rust out from the road salt, than you do *any* foreign made vehicle.
William
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This was probably a 3800 Series I or pre series I. They lasted quite well. To offset the obvious quality of this engine, GM engineers came up with the Series II, which screwed many of us. You may yet get hit by this on your Olds, if it hasnt already cratered.
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wrote in message news:d13c3161-

The 3800 Series II was a superior motor to the Series I. As long as you maintained it properly, and kept an eye on coolant levels, it will outlast any vehicle shell you could put it in.
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Your fell out of your nest. The Series II was the one infected with the decomposing plastic plenum, almost all of which failed. The whole engine was not usually ruined, but sometimes they were. Some failed under warranty, but probably the majority did not. The concept, and GM's handling of this span of poor quality engine components, was a disgrace.
And you know it!
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wrote in message >

Yes, I do know that. And you should know that after the plenum is repaired, the engine is bulletproof.
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wrote in message >

As a friend found out recently. $1600 to repair. Needless to say the next vehicle was not GM.
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Why did your "friend" pay for the repair? GM extend the warranty on that problem that was a result of the gasket manufacturer not meeting GM build specs.
I wonder how many of the Toyota buyers that had gasket problems bought another Toyota?
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Out of waranty. Means SOL.
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If warranty coverage is the main reason one buys a particular brand, one should prefer GM over Toyota

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